HORACE MAN

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Biography

Speeches

Responses

 

 

 

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Speeches

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Mann on Morals

During Mann's inauguration speech of Antioch College, "god, duty and humanity, were its theme throughout. The bringing of man to the fullest compliance with the laws of God, in every department of its being, that he might thereby come again to that nobility of character which through disobedience he had lost; and that, with this restored nobility, he might come nearer to God and do better service for men-the education and elevation of all men and women, alike and together-body, mind, and morals; body and mind as powers and instrumentalities for good and not evil; as well as that man might become more godlike in himself."

During his dedicatory address for Antioch College, Horace Mann said the following about the moral nature of man, "besides the physical and the intellectual, there is the moral nature of man,-the coronal part of our being...The moral and religious part of man's nature is the highest part. Of right it has sovereignty and dominion over all the rest. Some of our faculties were bestowed for a temporary purpose. This was given for an eternal one."

Mann on Temperance

The author also wrote of Mann, "In the same spirit, he became one of the earliest advocates of temperance legislation. In 1832 he advocated a law for the restriction of the sale of intoxicating drinks, and the prohibition of its sale on Sundays. At that time only two Boston men in the legislation stood with him-one a physician, the other the last survivor of the old 'Boston Tea Party.' In 1837 such a law was passed by an overwhelming majority in both houses. And when it became his privilege, as president of the Senate, to sign the bill, it was with a feeling of exultation. He felt that a moral victory had been gained."

Mann on Equal Education

"It was the view of Mr. Mann that a general education of all classes was essential to fit them for life and for citizenship." Mann's goal was to create an educational system that "included rich an poor, man and woman, native and foreign, free and bond, white, red, and black."

Responses

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Caleb Wall heard Horace Mann's lecture on education on November 21, 1840. Wall explained that education was the subject "which is the favorite of those who ardently feel for instruction and regeneration of their species, and who would see the whole of mankind pursuing this only road to happiness. The subject was remarkably well treated and illustrated by friend Mann, who showed himself worthy of the glorious cause in which he has been engaged. He dwelled mostly on the capability of our minds for receiving truth, and of the adaptation of external nature to the exercise of all our faculties, physical, intellectual, and moral, and illustrated by forcible instances the unspeakable advantages resulting from this exercise, as well as the degradation of which must accompany the neglect of it."

 

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