[Editorial Note: William Lloyd Garrison's initial editorial response, following the Convention, was a reprint of that in Adin Ballou's Practical Christian. Ballou, a Universalist minister, was the founder of the utopian community of Hopedale, Massachusetts. His Standard of Practical Christianity is available here. The Community was organized in 1841. It thrived for a time, but eventually merged with the Hopedale Parish. Several Hopedale residents played major roles in the Convention, particularly Mrs. Abby H. Price who gave a major address.]

The Liberator, Nov. 1, 1850
THE WOMAN'S RIGHTS CONVENTION.
This Convention was held in Worcester on the 23d and 24th inst., and we regret to say that we have barely time and room, this week, hastily to say, that in point of numbers, spirit and ability, it far exceeded our most sanguine hope and expectations, and was really the noblest series of meetings that we ever attended. Days and evenings, Brinley Hall was crowded with as intelligent, orderly, and interested a class of people as we ever saw assembled; and the speaking was uniformly the best we ever heard from such a large number of speakers. Lucretia Mott, Paulina Davis, Mrs. [Sarah] Tyndale, Wm. H. Channing, Wendell Phillips, Lucy Stone, Stephen S. and A.K. Foster, Abby H. Price, Miss [Antoinette] Brown, Frederick Douglass, Miss Morey [?], Mrs. [Ernestine] Rose -- these, that come crowding upon our mind, with others whose names we do not remember, and have not room to record, all spoke with a clearness, an earnestness, a directness, an eloquence, a philanthropy, an impressiveness, and a power, that inspired us with a fresh hope of humanity, and a new purpose to consecrate ourself to a physical, intellectual and moral redemption of the whole race. We should like exceedingly to speak of the address and remarks of each, but must reluctantly forbear. God bless all these noble men and women, and raise up more like them to labor in the great work of universal reformation, unity and happiness! Meanwhile, may all those who were present at the Convention and sympathizing with it, cherish the holy and sublime aspirations and purposes awakened within them, and unitedly and continually labor for the realization of what they long for! By and by, those who mean to be the doers of the word, as well as hearers and speakers of it, will organise Communities on the principles of justice and equality, in harmony with the law of celestial love. Let us hope on and ever. There is 'a good time coming.' The kingdom of God draweth near!

We copy the foregoing notice of the Worcester Convention from the Practical Christian, as an exact transcript of our own feelings and sentiments in regard to the proceedings of that highly intellectual and moral assembly. Our readers shall hereafter be furnished with the letters, addresses and speeches read or made on the occasion, as far as practicable.