tSTAK t &j'&[2` ` "t"%2d$LA*@ @ t"G"q]APP Y 9 ``` `V R@`: @"T@$P% &( - 1ؠ3W 58:x@`<@AD-E`,HKiP@Uu WG`@Y@Zz\i ]d&fb@ip q `w* x |h ` & ;@B s on dohelp owindow 32050,"help" set the defineresource of window "help" to "help.def" set the currFld_TEXTDATA of window "help" to "importantTips" set the importantTips_VISIBLE of window "help" to true show window "help" end dohelp on helpwinClick wName,cLine -- put cLine if cLine is empty then exit helpWinclick end if set the lockScreen of window wName to true get the currFld_TEXTDATA of window wName if it = 1 then set the importantTips_VISIBLE of window wName to false else if it=2 then set the navigation_VISIBLE of window wName to false else if it=3 then set the playingAudio_VISIBLE of window wName to false else if it=4 then set the findingWords_VISIBLE of window wName to false else if it=5 then set the marking_VISIBLE of window wName to false else if it=7 then set the viewingAnnotations_VISIBLE of window wName to false else if it=6 then set the takingNotes_VISIBLE of window wName to false else if it=8 then set the readingPoets_VISIBLE of window wName to false else if it=9 then set the largePrint_VISIBLE of window wName to false else if it=10 then set the otherPresentation_VISIBLE of window wName to false end if get cLine if it=1 then set the importantTips_VISIBLE of window wName to true set the importantTips_SCROLL of window wName to 0,0 set the hiliteBar_RECT of window wName to "0,22,244,42" else if it=2 then set the navigation_VISIBLE of window wName to true set the navigation_SCROLL of window wName to 0,0 set the hiliteBar_RECT of window wName to "0,45,244,65" else if it=3 then set the playingAudio_VISIBLE of window wName to true set the playingAudio_SCROLL of window wName to 0,0 set the hiliteBar_RECT of window wName to "0,67,244,87" else if it=4 then set the findingWords_VISIBLE of window wName to true set the findingWords_SCROLL of window wName to 0,0 set the hiliteBar_RECT of window wName to "0,90,244,110" else if it=5 then set the marking_VISIBLE of window wName to true set the marking_SCROLL of window wName to 0,0 set the hiliteBar_RECT of window wName to "0,114,244,134" else if it=7 then set the viewingAnnotations_VISIBLE of window wName to true set the viewingAnnotations_SCROLL of window wName to 0,0 set the hiliteBar_RECT of window wName to "0,159,244,179" else if it=6 then set the takingNotes_VISIBLE of window wName to true set the takingNotes_SCROLL of window wName to 0,0 set the hiliteBar_RECT of window wName to "0,136,244,156" else if it=8 then set the readingPoets_VISIBLE of window wName to true set the readingPoets_SCROLL of window wName to 0,0 set the hiliteBar_RECT of window wName to "0,182,244,202" else if it=9 then set the largePrint_VISIBLE of window wName to true set the largePrint_SCROLL of window wName to 0,0 set the hiliteBar_RECT of window wName to "0,205,244,225" else if it=10 then set the otherPresentation_VISIBLE of window wName to true set the otherPresentation_SCROLL of window wName to 0,0 set the hiliteBar_RECT of window wName to "0,228,244,248" end if set the currFld_TEXTDATA of window wName to it set the lockScreen of window wName to false end helpwinClick on gostack lock messages go to stack k end gostack function isBigScreen get the screenrect if item 3 of it>640 or item 4 of it>480 then return true else return false end if end isBigScreen function checkQT get QTVersion() if it is 0 then answer "Quicktime is not installed. Please install Quicktime 2.0, provided on the American Poetry CD." with "Quit" else if it<2 then answer "You have an old version of QuickTime installed." &" Please install QuickTime 2.0, provided the 'American Poetry CD'." with "Quit" else return true end if return false end checkQT function checkCD get the long name of this stack if it contains getDataPath() then answer "Please make sure that youve copied the 'American Poetry Folder' to your hard drive, and launch 'American Poetry' from there." with "Quit" return false end if if there is no file getDataPath()&"graphics:bgs:B1.PCT" then answer "Please mount the 'American Poetry CD' and try again." return false end if end checkCD function checkRAM if the heapspace<2550000 then answer "'American Poetry' requires 4000K of free memory. Please verify that this amount is available and allocated to Hypercard and try again." with "Quit" return false else return true end if end checkRAM -- stack script on hideOldTools if there is a window "controlsL1" then hide window "controlsL1" end if end hideOldTools on opencard global gRF lock screen ocstuff udb if there is a window "gauge" then if gRF="" then set scroll of window "gauge" to gScrl() hideOldTools end opencard on closecard global oldticks send "cleanInverse" to this cd put ticks() into oldticks ccs LR true LS end closecard on moveWindow opengauge end moveWindow on ftools hack beep if hack is not empty then pass ftools end ftools on errorAndQuit errStr if errStr is not empty then answer errStr --do cleanup domenu "Quit HyperCard" end errorAndQuit on getAux if the stacksinuse contains ".aux"=false then put getStackPath()&"Poetry.lib2" into stk -- answer stk start using stack stk end if end getAux ------- COLOR on showHiliteBar dontUnlock global colorOn,colorHiliteBar if the number of this bg=1 then exit showHiliteBar if colorOn is not true then exit showHiliteBar put fld "bgPictNum" into num put pictNumtoName(num) into bgName get getDataPath()&"graphics:hilBar:"&bgName put "505,197,600,270" into r HTAddPict it,r,"file" if dontUnlock is not true then HTLock forceOff hide bg btn "hiliteCvr" put true into colorHiliteBar end showHiliteBar on hideHiliteBar global colorHiliteBar if colorHiliteBar=true then HTLock on put fld "bgPictNum" into num put pictNumtoName(num) into bgName zapColorPal bgName,true showColorPal bgName HTLock forceoff show bg btn "hiliteCvr" put false into colorHiliteBar end if end hideHiliteBar function colorDoBtn r lock screen dimrect r put true into mWithin repeat until the mouse is up if the mouseloc is not within r then if mWithin is true then unlock screen put false into mWithin end if else if mWithin is false then lock screen dimrect r put true into mWithin end if end if end repeat if the mouseloc is within r then return true else return false end if end colorDoBtn on fadeDown global faded if faded is not true then fadegammadown 10 put true into faded end if end fadeDown on fadeUp global faded if faded=true then fadegammaup 10 put false into faded end if end fadeUp on setDepth8 get getScreenDepth() if it contains "8" =false then fadeDown setScreenDepth 8,"c" lock screen unlock screen get getScreenDepth() if it contains "8"=false then get "Error: Could not set monitor to 256 colors. Please try to" get it&" set this using the 'Monitors' control Panel. If you do not," get it&" The colors in this product will look strange." fadeUp answer it with "Quit" or "Continue" if it is "Quit" then errorAndQuit end if forceUnlock end if end setDepth8 on getColor global colorOn killcolor hideBW setDepth8 put true into colorOn HTUDefPal 10000 -- set custom pltt resource HyperTint "later","maxdepth8" fadeUp end getColor on killColor global colorOn,colorLastBgNum put 0 into colorLastBgNum put false into colorOn HTRemove go this cd end killColor function pictNumToName num return "B"&num&".pct" end pictNumToName function getDataPath return "American Poetry CD:" end getDataPath on showColorBg bgName set cursor to busy get getDataPath()&"graphics:Bgs:"&bgName HTChangePict it,"file" end showColorBg on zapColorBg global colorLastBgNum HTChangePict "none" put empty into colorLastBgNum end zapColorBg on showColorPal bgName global colorHiliteBar set cursor to busy get getDataPath()&"graphics:navpals:"&bgName if the number of this bg=1 then put "507,1,635,190" into r else put "507,1,635,216" into r end if HTLock on HTAddPict it,r,"file" --if colorHiliteBar=true then -- showHiliteBar true --end if HTLock forceOff hide bg btn "toolscvr" -- HTAddPict filename,rect,"file" end showColorPal on zapColorPal bgName, staylocked --** set cursor to busy get getDataPath()&"graphics:fullcvrs:"&bgName put "503,1,639,271" into r HTAddPict it,r,"file" show bg btn "toolscvr" show bg btn "hilitecvr" if staylocked is empty then HTLock forceOff end zapColorPal on colorPage -- this is done in both backgrounds end colorPage on colorRefreshPage global colorLastBgNum put empty into colorLastBgNum colorPage end colorRefreshPage ------- Tool Palette Stuff on doTools -- shows/hides tool palette global colorPalOn,colorOn,colorHiliteBar,bignav ensurePoetryMenu if the checkmark of menuitem 1 of menu "books" = true then -- zap tool palette show bg btn "toolsCvr" if colorOn=true then put fld "bgPictNum" into num if num is not empty then put pictNumToName(num) into bgName zapColorPal bgName put false into colorHiliteBar end if else send "hideBW" to this cd end if set the checkmark of menuitem 1 of menu "books" to false else -- show tool pal set the checkmark of menuitem 1 of menu "books" to true hide bg btn "toolsCvr" if colorOn=true then put true into colorPalOn put fld "bgPictNum" into num if num is not empty then put pictNumtoName(num) into bgName showColorPal bgName end if else send "Showbw" to this cd end if end if -- if the checkmark of menuitem 1 of menu Books = true then -- end if end doTools ------- PREFERENCE STUFF (lowest part of "Am.Poetry" menu on ensurePoetryMenu global poetryMenuName if there is no menu "books" then booksmenu end if if there is no menu poetryMenuName then createPoetryMenu end if end ensurePoetryMenu on savePrefs ensurePoetryMenu put the number of menuitems in menu "Am.Poetry" into num repeat with i=1 to num put the checkmark of menuitem i of menu "Am.Poetry" into line i of build end repeat put true into line 6 of build -- Color always ON put false into line 8 of build -- Invert never ON on startup put build into cd fld "savedPrefs" of cd "overview" put empty into build put the checkmark of menuitem 1 of menu "books" into line 1 of build put the checkmark of menuitem 5 of menu "books" into line 2 of build put build into cd fld "savedBookPrefs" of cd "overview" end savePrefs on restorePrefs ensurePoetryMenu put the number of menuitems in menu "Am.Poetry" into num put cd fld "savedPrefs" of cd "overview" into build repeat with i=1 to num set the checkmark of menuitem i of menu "Am.Poetry" to line i of build end repeat put cd fld "savedBookPrefs" of cd "overview" into build set the checkmark of menuitem 1 of menu "books" to line 1 of build set the checkmark of menuitem 5 of menu "books" to line 2 of build send "checkmenu" to this cd end restorePrefs function prefCheck itemName global poetryMenuName ensurePoetryMenu return the checkmark of menuitem itemName of menu poetryMenuName end prefCheck on setPref itemName,itemVal global poetryMenuName ensurePoetryMenu set the checkmark of menuitem itemName of menu poetryMenuName to itemVal end setPref on prefInvText savedOn if savedOn is not empty then send showInverse to this cd exit prefInvText end if if prefCheck("inverse Text") = true then send hideInverse to this cd else send showInverse to this cd end if end prefInvText on showInverse lock screen if the number of this cdthe number of cd "overview" then if there is a btn "inverse" then hide bg btn "inverseText" else show bg btn "inverseText" end if set the hilite of bg btn "inverseText" to true killColor send showBW to this cd setPref "Inverse Text",true setupInverse disable menuitem "Color Backgrounds" of menu "Am.Poetry" end if unlock screen end showInverse on hideInverse if the number of this cd>the number of cd overview then if the visible of bg btn "inverseText"=false then exit hideInverse end if else if the short name of this cd="overview" then -- send "hideinverse" to this cd exit hideInverse end if end if lock screen if prefCheck("Color Backgrounds")=true then lock screen cbusy getColor cbusy send "ColorPage" to this cd unlock screen end if cleanInverse hide bg btn "inverseText" enable menuitem "Color Backgrounds" of menu "Am.Poetry" setPref "Inverse Text",false unlock screen end hideInverse on setupInverse if there is a btn "overhead" then set the hilite of btn "overhead" to true if there is a cd fld "chapter title" then put cd fld "chapter title" into fld "chapter title" show fld "chapter title" hide cd fld "chapter title" else hide fld "chapter title" end if end setupInverse on cleanInverse if there is a btn "overhead" then set the hilite of btn "overhead" to false if there is a cd fld "chapter title" then show cd fld "chapter title" hide fld "chapter title" put empty into fld "chapter title" end cleanInverse on prefLargePal savedOn global poetryMenu,bignav if savedOn is not empty then showLargePal setPref "Large Tool Palette", true exit prefLargePal end if if there is a window bignav then close window bignav setPref "Large Tool Palette", false else showLargePal setPref "Large Tool Palette", true end if end prefLargePal on prefColorBgs savedOff global poetryMenu if savedOff is not empty then killColor send showBW to this cd setPref "Color Backgrounds",false exit prefColorBgs end if if prefCheck("color Backgrounds") is true then killColor send showBW to this cd setPref "Color Backgrounds",false else getColor send "colorPage" to this cd setPref "Color Backgrounds",true set the checkmark of menuitem "Tool Palette" of menu "Books" to not the checkmark of menuitem "Tool Palette" of menu "books" send "doTools" to this cd end if end prefColorBgs on prefMovSpeaker savedOff if savedOff is not empty then setPref "Moving Speaker",false exit prefMovSpeaker end if if prefCheck("Moving Speaker") = true then setPref "Moving Speaker",false else setPref "Moving Speaker",true end if end prefMovSpeaker on prefFrame savedOff if savedOff is not empty then if there is a window "Carpet" then close window "Carpet" setPref "frame",false end if exit prefFrame end if if there is a window "carpet" then close window "Carpet" setPref "frame",false else carpet setPref "frame",true end if end prefFrame on prefTitle savedOff if savedOff is not empty then setPref "Title Bar",false hide titlebar exit prefTitle end if if prefCheck("Title Bar") = true then setPref "Title Bar",false hide titlebar else setPref "Title Bar",true show titlebar end if end prefTitle on closeLargePal -- sent by large palette when closing setPref "Large Tool Palette", false end closeLargePal on showLargeJump end showLargeJump on domenu a,b global emergencyQuit if a contains "Quit" then if there is no menu "books" and emergencyQuit is not true then start using stack "Poetry.lib1" booksmenu end if fadeup pass domenu end if if there is a menu "Books" then if menuitem 5 of menu "books" = a then doLarge exit domenu else if menuitem 1 of menu "books" = a then doTools exit domenu end if end if pass domenu end domenu on doLarge global poemSize, bigScreen if the checkmark of menuitem 5 of menu "books" = true then put "S" into poemSize set the checkmark of menuitem 5 of menu "books" to false send "hideLarge" to this cd else put "L" into poemSize set the checkmark of menuitem 5 of menu "books" to true send showLarge to this cd showLargePal if the number of this bg=1 then answer "Large Print will not appear in the Contents." &" Click the page icon in the Large Tool Palette for a Large Print chapter list." end if hideHiliteBar if bigScreen is not true then global mST,mS put false into mS set the checkmark of menuitem 2 of menu "books" to false put false into mST hide menubar put false into mS end if end if end doLarge on dochap showcontents end dochap on showcontents send "pauseAudio" to this cd if the target contains "chapter title" then showBio exit showContents end if global tct,chapters,chapterstart,spcase,chaptersMenu if chapters="" then fillthem put chapters into ch put return into r if chaptersMenu is empty then put getChapMenu() into chaptersMenu end if -- put getstr("chapmenucstr") into chaptersMenu get popitup(chaptersMenu,0,clickh(),clickv()) put item 1 of it into v put item 2 of it into h put item h of line v of chaptersMenu into chosen goToChapter chosen end showcontents function lineOffset string, where if string is not in where then return 0 get offset(string,where) return the number of lines of (char 1 to it of where) end lineOffset function getChapName chosen global chaptersMenu put item 2 of chosen into theItem put item 1 of chosen into theLine return item theItem of line theLine of chaptersMenu end getChapName function stripchar c,txt get offset(c,txt) repeat until it < 1 put " " into char it of txt get offset(c,txt) end repeat return txt end stripchar function getChapMenu global chapters, chaptersmenu return getstr("chapMenuCSTR") end getChapMenu on checkItem itemNum,menuName if there is a menu menuName then set the checkmark of menuitem itemNum of menu "Am.Poetry" to true end if end checkItem on uncheckItem end uncheckItem on createPoetryMenu global colorOn,colorLastBgNum,colorPalOn,colorHiliteOn,colorHiliteBar if there is a menu "Am.Poetry" then delete menu "Am.Poetry" end if put return into r put "Play Performance"&r&"Clear Highlights" into m put m&r&"Find Next Performance"&r&"-"&r into m put m&"Frame"&r&"Title Bar"&r&"Color Backgrounds"&r&"Moving Speaker"&r&"Inverse Text"&r&"Large Tool Palette" into m put "playPauseAudio"&r&"clearHilites"&r&"goNextRecital" &r&" "&r&"prefFrame"&r&"prefTitle"&r&"prefColorBgs"&r&"prefMovSpeaker"&r&"prefInvText"&r&"prefLargePal" into mmsg global poetryMenuName put poetryMenuName into mname create menu mname repeat with i=1 to the number of lines in m put line i of m after menu mname with menumessage line i of mmsg end repeat setPref "Color Backgrounds",true put true into colorOn setPref "Moving Speaker",true setPref "Title Bar",true if there is a menu "books" then set the checkmark of menuitem "Tool Palette" of menu "Books" to true end if end createPoetryMenu -- AMERICAN POETRY scripts on setupPoetryGlobals global audioMovieName, audioMoviePath, chaptersMenu, poetryMenuName, firstContentspg global bigScreen,emergencyQuit put IsBigScreen() into bigScreen put getStackPath() into stackPath put getDataPath()&"audio:" into audioMoviePath put empty into audioMovieName put "Am.Poetry" into poetryMenuName put getChapMenu() into chaptersMenu end setupPoetryGlobals on setupPoetry global emergencyQuit if checkCD()=false then put true into emergencyQuit if checkRAM()=false then put true into emergencyQuit if checkQT()=false then put true into emergencyQuit if checkFonts()=false then put true into emergencyQuit if emergencyQuit is true then fadeUp lock messages domenu "Quit Hypercard" else getAux getColor--(load hypertint) setupPoetryGlobals createPoetryMenu -- restorePrefs end if end setupPoetry on dofind global oldtext,theText,FIC send "pauseAudio" to this cd ccs put true into df put "" into FIC put GetFilesInDir(getSFPath(),"TEXT",return) into sfl if mouse()="down" then put false into df if sfl"" then put sfl&return&"-"&return&tStr("LibMsg",9) into holder get popitup(holder,0,clickh()-100,clickv()) get item 1 of it put it=numLns(holder) into df if (not df and it>0) then TWOldFind line it of sfl end if else answer tStr("LibMsg",10)&&ssn()&"." end if end if if not (df) then exit dofind put id of this cd into FF showFind exit doFind if it="" then exit dofind put sfl into sfp if IsOldFind(it,sfp) then if the selectedchunkempty then select empty US find word 1 of thetext put foundchunk() into fc shf fc select fc exit dofind end if cbusy put it into oldtext put it into theText getallincontext "" end dofind on getall end getall -- overriden library functions on idle global mST,mS if there is a window "status" then close window "status" if mS="" then put false into mS if mST=true then mySHMB true else get mousev()+top of cd window if it<5 then mySHMB true else if it>20 then mySHMB false end if end idle -- UTILITY dev scripts function getStackPath get long name of this stack delete word 1 of it delete char 1 of it delete last char of it set itemdelimiter to ":" delete last item of it set itemdelimiter to "," return it&":" end getStackPath on bt choose button tool end bt on ft choose field tool end ft on edbg domenu "background" end edbg on showcstr cstrname get getstr(cstrname) if it is empty then beep else get "on "&cstrname&return&it set the script of bg btn "dumb" to it edit the script of bg btn "dumb" end if end showcstr --------------------------------- Copyright 1992 - 1993 The Voyager Company, All Rights Reserved -- on fixFontcd lock screen put the number of chars in fld "styled" into numchars repeat with j=1 to numchars set cursor to busy if the textfont of char j of fld "styled" contains "Voyager" = false then set the textFont of char j of fld "styled" to "Palex" end if end repeat unlock screen end fixFontcd on fixFontcd put the number of chars in fld "styled" into numchars repeat with i=1 to the number of lines in fld "styled" set cursor to busy set the textfont of word 1 to 100000 of line i of fld "styled" to "Palex" end repeat end fixFontcd on fixFont lock messages lock screen put the number of cds in bg 2 into numCds repeat with i=80 to numCds go cd i of bg 2 put numcds-i fixFontCd end repeat unlock screen end fixFont on openstack global gCurLang set the cantabort of this stack to true if not StackInUse("Poetry.lib1") then start using stack GetStackPath()&"Poetry.lib1" put getStr("CurrentLanguage") into gCurLang if gCurLang = "" then put 1 into gCurLang doCSTR "FillgHCLangCSTR" checkVersions checkTemplate -- checkFonts justopened -- updateUMState get HasCSTR("HasExLibris") if it = "" or it = "true" then doCSTR "ValidityCSTR" end if set the cantabort of this stack to false -- pass openstack ---------------- setupPoetry set the blindtyping to true -- put "done" ----------------- pass openstack end openstack on nextchap global chapterstart put wai() into w put chapterstart into c do "sort items of c numeric" repeat if item 1 of c is not a number then delete item 1 of c else exit repeat end repeat get item w+2 of c if it = item w+1 of c then get item w+3 of c if it is a number and it "" then gopage it else go cd "overview" end nextchap on prevchap global chapterstart put wai() into w put chapterstart into c put last item of c into lastchap do "sort items of c numeric" repeat if item 1 of c is not a number then delete item 1 of c else exit repeat end repeat get item w of c if it is a number then if it 1 then gopage it else go cd "overview" end if end prevchap function rightversion get the version if it < 2.1 then answer tStr("BookMsg",1); return false else return true end if end rightversion function rightLibrary put getStr("ThisLibraryVersion") into LV if LV = "" then put "1.1" into LV put getStr("NeedsLibraryVersion") into BLV if BLV = "" then put "1.1" into BLV if LV < BLV then answer the short name of this stack&&tStr("BookMsg",2)&&BLV&&tStr("BookMsg",3) return false else return true end if end rightLibrary on updateUMState put tStr("LibMsg",40) into bn handleMIState "HasLargePrintMenuItem", tStr("LibMsg",45), bn handleMIState "HasAnnotationMenuItem", tStr("LibMsg",46), bn eMenu tStr("LibMsg",41),bn eMenu tStr("LibMsg",43),bn eMenu tStr("LibMsg",44),bn eMenu tStr("LibMsg",53),bn eMenu tStr("LibMsg",52),bn eMenu tStr("LibMsg",51),bn end updateUMState on handleMIState theString, theItem, theMenu get HasCSTR(theString) if it = "" then eMenu theItem,theMenu else if it = "true" then eMenu theItem,theMenu else dMenu theItem,theMenu end if end handleMIState on checkVersions if not rightversion() then domenu HCMI(31) exit to hypercard end if if not rightLibrary() then domenu HCMI(31) exit to hypercard end if end checkVersions function stackExists n put false into b put getstackpath() into dir put getFilesInDir(dir,"",return) into flist repeat with x = 1 to the number of lines in flist put (line x of flist = n) into b if b then exit repeat end repeat return b end stackExists on resumestack if not StackInUse("Poetry.lib1") then start using stack GetStackPath()&"Poetry.lib1" if there is not a menu tStr("LibMsg",40) then justopened else fillthem end if movewindow if CDs() and not RB() then LS -- UDtools ocstuff US end if updateUMState end resumestack on suspend if the number of this bg>1 then send pauseAudio to this cd end suspend on suspendstack if the number of this bg>1 then send pauseAudio to this cd doCSTR "SaveBookMenuSettingsCSTR" get sbn() if it = "details" then AddToRT (tStr("LibMsg",20)&&fld "pageNo") else if it = "title page" then AddToRT fld "description" pass suspendstack end suspendstack on closestack global emergencyQuit if emergencyQuittrue then -- savePrefs set the cantabort of this stack to true set the checkmark of menuitem 1 of menu "books" to false show bg btn "toolsCvr" of cd 1 of bg "details" doCSTR "SaveBookMenuSettingsCSTR" send "hideBW" to this cd pass closestack end if end closestack function StackInUse sn put the itemdelimiter into id put the stacksinuse into siu put false into b set the itemdelimiter to ":" repeat with x = 1 to the number of lines in siu put (sn=last item of line x of siu) into b if b then exit repeat end repeat set the itemdelimiter to id return b end StackInUse function getStackPath get long name of this stack delete word 1 of it delete char 1 of it delete last char of it set itemdelimiter to ":" delete last item of it set itemdelimiter to "," return it&":" end getStackPath function checkFonts put HasCSTR("FontList") into theFonts if theFonts"" then put "" into missing put the itemdelimiter into id repeat with x = 1 to the number of lines in theFonts get line x of theFonts if not(FontExists(item 1 of it, item 2 of it)) then put it into line ((the number of lines in missing) + 1) of missing end if if the number of chars in missing > 200 then exit repeat end repeat if missing"" then -- put tStr("BookMsg",10)&&ssn()&", "&tStr("BookMsg",11)&return&return&missing into mymsg put "Please install fonts provided on the 'American Poetry CD'." into mymsg beep answer mymsg with "Continue" or "Quit" if it is "Quit" then return false end if set the itemdelimiter to id end if end if return true end checkFonts on checkTemplate send "checkTemplate" to bg 1 -- saves space in stack script end checkTemplate on ocstuff global TDi,cST if there is a fld "marked cards" then get fld "marked cards" if number of words in it2 then if offset(return&(CN())& return,it)>0 then get TDi else get 30016 if icon of bg Btn "markme"it then set icon of bg Btn "markme" to it end if if cST then UDclips end if end ocstuff function OnScrnRect test, r put the itemdelimiter into id set the itemdelimiter to "," put line 1 of getscreenrects(item 1 of test, item 2 of test, item 3 of test, item 4 of test) into test if test is not a rect then put the screenrect into test if item 1 of r < item 1 of test then get item 1 of test - item 1 of r add it to item 1 of r add it to item 3 of r end if if item 3 of r > item 3 of test then get item 3 of test - item 3 of r add it to item 1 of r add it to item 3 of r end if if item 2 of r < item 2 of test then get item 2 of test - item 2 of r add it to item 2 of r add it to item 4 of r end if if item 4 of r > item 4 of test then get item 4 of test - item 4 of r add it to item 2 of r add it to item 4 of r end if set the itemdelimiter to id return r end OnScrnRect d it to item 3 of r end if if item 2 of r < item 2 of test then get item 2 of test - item 2 of r add it to item 2 of r add it to item 4 of r end if if item 4 of r > item 4 of test then get item 4 of test - item 4 of r add it to item 2 of r add it to item 4 of r end if set the itemdelimiter to id return r end OnScrnRect end if end checkFonts on checkTemplate send "checkTemplate" to bg 1 -- saves space end checkTemplateend checkTemplateNMAST[[)h)E$?jZ((rYFjӥ fu!&j:( h((Uߝ~pgi^V^ 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Willis. A second novel, The Rebels, or Boston Before the Revolution (1825), was less well received. Edited first American childrens magazine, The Juvenile Miscellany (182629); during same period ran private school in Watertown, Massachusetts; made acquaintance of Margaret Fuller. Married David Lee Child, lawyer and newspaper editor, in 1828; they had no children. Wrote financially successful household manual The Frugal Housewife (1829). Husbands financial difficulties resulted in his being briefly jailed for debt in 1830. Along with her husband, became increasingly involved in abolitionist movement, and published series of controversial anti-slavery works: An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans (1833), The Oasis (1834), and An Anti-Slavery Catechism (1836). In the same period published two-volume History of the Condition of Women in Various Ages and Nations (1835) and Philothea (1836), philosophical novel set in ancient Athens. Moved v3 3 31k3333rFrRSr]^h3io33333 333Uj333333Srmnrstrvwrrr3rrrrrr%&r*+r./r67=3>A3BrKLIndians in 17th-century New England, established reputation as writer; she became acquainted with literary figures including George Ticknor, William Ellery Channing, and Nathaniel P. Willis. A second novel, The Rebels, or Boston Before the Revolution (1825), was less well received. Edited first American childrens magazine, The Juvenile Miscellany (182629); during same period ran private school in Watertown, Massachusetts; made acquaintance of Margaret Fuller. Married David Lee Child, lawyer and newspaper editor, in 1828; they had no children. Wrote financially successful household manual The Frugal Housewife (1829). Husbands financial difficulties resulted in his being briefly jailed for debt in 1830. Along with her husband, became increasingly involved in abolitionist movement, and published series of controversial anti-slavery works: An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans (1833), The Oasis (1834), and An Anti-Slavery Catechism (1836). In the same period published two-volume History of the Condition of Women in Various Ages and Nations (1835) and Philothea (1836), philosophical novel set in ancient Athens. Moved 46[֜sqj[ CARDހ@  s93458[Biographical Notes[q q qqq q!%q&(q).q/8q9=q>y3z3333"3#(3)435;3<E3FrHIrPQrSTrZe3lp33333333rrrrr33r% *, 02 6iqjwqx{q|~qqq333333 33!3"'3(*3+.3/435738Green; she died during the first year of their marriage; they had no children, and Bodman never remarried. Practiced law. Following wifes death, experienced another and more intense series of diabolical apparitions and religious visions. Delivered confessional speeches in Williamsburg and other neighboring towns. Published An Oration on Death (1817), an account of his religious experiences interspersed with occasional poems; other publications included Washingtons Birth Day, An Oration (1814) and Oration on the Birth of Our Savior (1826). GEORGE HENRY BOKER (October 6, l823January 2, l890) b. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, son of Charles Boker, wealthy banker. Attended College of New Jersey (now Princeton), graduating in l842. Relative and boyhood companion Charles Godfrey Leland described Boker in his youth as quite familiar, in a refined and gentlemanly way, with all the dissipations of Philadelphia and New York. In 1844 married Julia Mandeville Riggs, with whom, after a brief European tour, he settled in Philadelphia; they had one son, George. Abandoned study of law to pursue career as Cq q qqq q!%q&(q).q/8q9=q>y3z3333"3#(3)435;3<E3FrHIrPQrSTrZe3lp33333333rrrrr33riqjwqx{q|~qqq333333 33!3"'3(*3+.3/435738Green; she died during the first year of their marriage; they had no children, and Bodman never remarried. Practiced law. Following wifes death, experienced another and more intense series of diabolical apparitions and religious visions. Delivered confessional speeches in Williamsburg and other neighboring towns. Published An Oration on Death (1817), an account of his religious experiences interspersed with occasional poems; other publications included Washingtons Birth Day, An Oration (1814) and Oration on the Birth of Our Savior (1826). GEORGE HENRY BOKER (October 6, l823January 2, l890) b. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, son of Charles Boker, wealthy banker. Attended College of New Jersey (now Princeton), graduating in l842. Relative and boyhood companion Charles Godfrey Leland described Boker in his youth as quite familiar, in a refined and gentlemanly way, with all the dissipations of Philadelphia and New York. In 1844 married Julia Mandeville Riggs, with whom, after a brief European tour, he settled in Philadelphia; they had one son, George. Abandoned study of law to pursue career as 46 to pursue caree `CARD;@  s93589[Biographical Notesi3 3 312333333333  33333 3!*3+132435839?3@B3CH3IK3L3333333333U3V\3]h3ip3qs3trwxr}~rrtrtqqqrtrtrtrrwqxqrHugh Swinton Legar. Father edited a farm journal, briefly kept a hotel, and eventually opened an agricultural supply store. Attended College of Charleston, graduating 1841, and St. Marys College in Baltimore. Eulogized Hugh Swinton Legars death in June 1843 in poem On the Death of a Kinsman. Worked in law office of James L. Petigru in Charleston; wrote poetry; painted (as he would continue to do throughout his life). Fabricated evidence of noble origins of Legar family, but hoax was exposed in newspapers. Suffered first of recurrent lung hemorrhages. Had his poetry and fiction published by William Gilmore Simms in various periodicals; John James Audubon, an acquaintance of his father, offered to help find a publisher for his poetry. Moved with family in 1846 to Aiken in the South Carolina midlands; father declared bankruptcy two years later. Contributed writing to The Opal, Southern Literary Messenger, the Athens (Georgia) Weekly Gazette, The Literary World, Grahams Magazine, and The Knickerbocker. Briefly ran school; taught drawing in Augusta, Georgia, and elsewhere. Initiated long correspondence with Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Verse collection Orta-Undis (1848) i3 3 312333333333  33333 3!*3+132435839?3@B3CH3IK3L3333333333U3V\3]h3ip3qs3trwxr}~rrtrtqqqrtrtrtrrwqxqrHugh Swinton Legar. Father edited a farm journal, briefly kept a hotel, and eventually opened an agricultural supply store. Attended College of Charleston, graduating 1841, and St. Marys College in Baltimore. Eulogized Hugh Swinton Legars death in June 1843 in poem On the Death of a Kinsman. Worked in law office of James L. Petigru in Charleston; wrote poetry; painted (as he would continue to do throughout his life). Fabricated evidence of noble origins of Legar family, but hoax was exposed in newspapers. Suffered first of recurrent lung hemorrhages. Had his poetry and fiction published by William Gilmore Simms in various periodicals; John James Audubon, an acquaintance of his father, offered to help find a publisher for his poetry. Moved with family in 1846 to Aiken in the South Carolina midlands; father declared bankruptcy two years later. Contributed writing to The Opal, Southern Literary Messenger, the Athens (Georgia) Weekly Gazette, The Literary World, Grahams Magazine, and The Knickerbocker. Briefly ran school; taught drawing in Augusta, Georgia, and elsewhere. Initiated long correspondence with Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Verse collection Orta-Undis (1848) 46ѐsleCARDW(j*9 !"*+12679:@AGHPQST[\ab  "#'(/03478p|}*+ghlmrs}~ @by a specter of violent madness. Important painters like Washington Allston and Thomas Cole wrote a considerable amount of poetry, some of which is included here. (William Blake aside, Samuel Palmer, Joseph Turner, and D. G. Rossetti come to mind as analogous examples in England. And like Turners poems, many of Coles allude directly to matters dealt with in his painting.) It may also be surprising to find the celebrated actress Fanny Kemble included in this collection, along with performer Adah Isaacs Menken. Then there are the novelists: Many readers may not realize that in the American nineteenth century William Dean Howells, Edith Wharton, Sarah Orne Jewett, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Hamlin Garland, and Stephen Crane all wrote poetry, some of it quite impressive, all of it much more than competent. Some of the unexpected verse in this anthology reflects what were often surprising discoveries of my own. During the course of exploring pages I had never turned before, I came upon poets I had never met at all: Forecythe Willson, with his remarkable visionary poem In State *33426 Introduction01@CARD*jK"#ABXY{|:;VW=>^_ Further in Summer than the Birds Perception of an object costs Title divineis mine! At Half past Three, a single Bird Ended, ere it begun My Cocoon tightensColors tease Between the form of Life and Life The murmuring of Bees, has ceased There is another Loneliness Tell all the Truth but tell it slant The Props assist the House Ourselves we do inter with sweet derision After a hundred years Great Streets of silence led away Somehow myself survived the Night My Triumph lasted till the Drums The Clovers simple Fame To pile like Thunder to its close There is no Frigate like a Book Go slow, my soul, to feed thyself Heavenly Fathertake to thee i2349 2350 2351 2352 2352 2353 2354 2355 2356 2356 2357 2357 2358 2359 2359 2360 2361 2361 2362 2362 2363 amerbg.pct*44457619th-Century American Poets CARD0B/Dj; $%,-?@ST]^_`dfkmp}~#01CDJOAQUIN MILLER (18371913) Sierras Africa In Pre La Chaise At Our Golden Gate Columbus ABRAM JOSEPH RYAN (18381886) Lines WILLIAM REED HUNTINGTON (18381909) The Cold Meteorite Lowlands From Green Mountain JOHN HAY (18381905) Jim Bludso, Of the Prairie Belle HENRY ADAMS (18381918) Buddha and Brahma T2478 2478 2480 2484 2486 2489 2492 2492 2495 2495 2496 2497 2499 2499 2503 2503 amerbg.pct*44462619th-Century American Poets6Ԡ`CARD1/Djp  !*+,-57>@FSTefxy"#$%*,1>?TV^`JAMES RYDER RANDALL (18391908) Maryland CONSTANCE FENIMORE WOOLSON (18401894) Love Unexpressed The Florida Beach Detroit River EDWARD ROWLAND SILL (18411887) The Fools Prayer Opportunity Truth at Last California Winter CHARLES EDWARD CARRYL (18411920) A Nautical Ballad SIDNEY LANIER (18421881) Hymns of the Marshes Sunrise The Cloud Y2516 2516 2521 2521 2523 2526 2529 2529 2532 2533 2534 2537 2537 2540 2540 2540 2552 amerbg.pct*44463619th-Century American Poets6PCARD6G/DjD #$23458:@BGTUklxy 23MNSijklprxEUGENE FIELD (18501895) The Duel Dutch Lullaby ELLA WHEELER WILCOX (18501919) Friendship After Love No Classes! The Sonnet The Engine Nothing New ROSE HARTWICK THORPE (18501939) Curfew Must Not Ring To-Night ALBERY ALLSON WHITMAN (18511901) from Twasintas Seminoles, or Rape of Florida The Lute of Africs Tribe from An Idyll of the South EDWIN MARKHAM (18521940) The Man with the Hoe Y2677 2677 2679 2682 2682 2683 2685 2686 2687 2688 2688 2695 2695 2702 2705 2711 2711 amerbg.pct*44468619th-Century American PoetsFREEFree Object F% L[Credits and Acknowledgementss9429337 d; Trtesy oflo 3CARDY@] s9793[Henry Wadsworth Longfellow^>iVThe king gazed upward at the cloudless sky, Whispered a word, and raised his hand on high, And lo! the signet-ring of chrysoprase On his uplifted finger seemed to blaze With hidden fire, and rushing from the west There came a mighty wind, and seized the guest And lifted him from earth, and on they passed, His shining garments streaming in the blast, A silken banner oer the walls upreared, A purple cloud, that gleamed and disappeared. Then said the Angel, smiling: If this man Be Rajah Runjeet-Sing of Hindostan, Thou hast done well in listening to his prayer; I was upon my way to seek him there. Snow-Flakes Out of the bosom of the Air, Out of the cloud-folds of her garments shaken, Over the woodlands brown and bare 34 034long6.MOV0,5161# 0 1284 3326 5160read by James Merrillrd, and raised his hand on high, And lo! the signet-ring of chrysoprase On his uplifted finger seemed to blaze With hidden fire, and rushing from the west There came a mighty wind, and seized the guest And lifted him from earth, and on they passed, His shining garments streaming in the blast, A silken banner oer the walls upreared, A purple cloud, that gleamed and disappeared. Then said the Angel, smiling: If this man Be Rajah Runjeet-Sing of Hindostan, Thou hast done well in listening to his prayer; I was upon my way to seek him there. Snow-Flakes Out of the bosom of the Air, Out of the cloud-folds of her garments shaken, Over the woodlands brown and bare 34 034long6.MOV0,5161# `CARD(j  01CDMNmn)*9:IJUV[hilnsuyRICHARD HENRY DANA (17871879) The Dying Raven The Pleasure Boat Daybreak The Husbands and Wifes Grave The Chanting Cherubs RICHARD HENRY WILDE (17891847) The Lament of the Captive To the Mocking-Bird from Hesperia FITZ-GREENE HALLECK (17901867) On the Death of Joseph Rodman Drake Alnwick Castle Marco Bozzaris Red Jacket from Connecticut JOHN HOWARD PAYNE (17911852) Home, Sweet Home! K134 134 140 146 151 157 159 159 160 161 181 181 183 190 196 202 207 207 amerbg.pct*44414619th-Century American PoetsL7\NV @CARDr]@  s93462[Biographical NotesZ   >3?L3eh3i33333333333333 3 I3JQ3RY3lt3u3J3q49q:AqBJqKMqNSqTZq[33333rrr rlrzCHARLES TIMOTHY BROOKS (June 20, 1813June 14, 1883) b. Salem, Massachusetts. Son of Mary King Mason and Timothy Brooks. Heard Emerson preach at South Church, Boston, in 1831. Graduated Harvard College (where he studied German literature with refugee scholar Charles Follen) in 1832; classmates included Charles Sumner and Oliver Wendell Holmes; graduated Harvard Divinity School (where classmates included Theodore Parker and Christopher Pearse Cranch) in 1835. Officiated in several New England churches, including brief terms at Nahant, Massachusetts, Bangor and Augusta, Maine, and Windsor, Vermont; ordained (by the elder William Ellery Channing) pastor of Unitarian Congregational Church in Newport, Rhode Island, 1837; served at the church until 1870, when failing eyesight forced his retirement. Married Harriet Lyman Hazard, daughter of Rhode Island legislator, in 1837; they had two sons and two daughters. Published translations from German, including Schillers William Tell (1837) and Homage of the Arts (1847); anthologies Songs and Ballads (1842), to which Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and others also contributed, and German Lyrics (1853); and ȁB>3?L3eh3i33333333333333 3 I3JQ3RY3lt3u3J3q49q:AqBJqKMqNSqTZq[33333rrr rlrzCHARLES TIMOTHY BROOKS (June 20, 1813June 14, 1883) b. Salem, Massachusetts. Son of Mary King Mason and Timothy Brooks. Heard Emerson preach at South Church, Boston, in 1831. Graduated Harvard College (where he studied German literature with refugee scholar Charles Follen) in 1832; classmates included Charles Sumner and Oliver Wendell Holmes; graduated Harvard Divinity School (where classmates included Theodore Parker and Christopher Pearse Cranch) in 1835. Officiated in several New England churches, including brief terms at Nahant, Massachusetts, Bangor and Augusta, Maine, and Windsor, Vermont; ordained (by the elder William Ellery Channing) pastor of Unitarian Congregational Church in Newport, Rhode Island, 1837; served at the church until 1870, when failing eyesight forced his retirement. Married Harriet Lyman Hazard, daughter of Rhode Island legislator, in 1837; they had two sons and two daughters. Published translations from German, including Schillers William Tell (1837) and Homage of the Arts (1847); anthologies Songs and Ballads (1842), to which Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and others also contributed, and German Lyrics (1853); and 46lator, in 1837; they (18lator, in 1837; CARDU< TNMVO{rrrr"#r2rrrA Wounded Deerleaps highest A young man came to me with a message from his brother, A youth in apparel that glittered Aaron Stark Aboard at a Ships Helm Aboard at a ships helm, About the Shark, phlegmatical one, Above the Circus of the World she sat, Accident in Art Accountability Acorn Song, The Across the bridge, where in the morning blow Across the Prairies silent waste I stray, Adieu, fair isle! I love thy bowers, Adventurous mariner! in whose gray skiff, Advice Gratis to Certain Women Advice to a Raven in Russia Africa After a hundred years After a night of languor without rest, [ Index of Titles and First Liness9412349d2225 1549 1549 2901 2873 1673 1673 1900 2839 2836 2916 3071 2778 174 379 422 2096 46 2480 2358 1206the rrr"#r2rrrA Wounded Deerleaps highest A young man came to me with a message from his brother, A youth in apparel that glittered Aaron Stark Aboard at a Ships Helm Aboard at a ships helm, About the Shark, phlegmatical one, Above the Circus of the World she sat, Accident in Art Accountability Acorn Song, The Across the bridge, where in the morning blow Across the Prairies silent waste I stray, Adieu, fair isle! I love thy bowers, Adventurous mariner! in whose gray skiff, Advice Gratis to Certain Women Advice to a Rave`CARD@0 s93485[Biographical Notes 3 33%3&-3.536;q<CqDKqLOqPZq[`qafqg333r3 &3'(3)/30233<3=B3CE3FS3TX3Yb3ci3jr3sw3x}3~3333333333333r3rrr33rr  33!3"(r2:rGOrU]r   3333333  3 33$3%-3.3333333333Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, Bronson Alcott, James Russell Lowell, and especially Henry David Thoreau, whom he accompanied on trips to Cape Cod, Maine, and Canada, and on frequent excursions around Concord. (Wrote first biography of Thoreau, Thoreau, The Poet- Naturalist, 1873; edited a number of Thoreaus works in collaboration with Thoreaus sister Sophia.) Last years spent in the home of his friend Franklin B. Sanborn. Published verse collections Poems (1843), Poems, Second Series (1847), and The Woodman (1849), and book-length poems Near Home (1858), The Wanderer (1871), Eliot (1885), and John Brown and the Heroes of Harpers Ferry (1886). JOHN JAY CHAPMAN (March 2, 1862November 4, 1933) b. New York, New York. Son of Eleanor Jay and Henry Grafton Chapman. Graduated Harvard 1885; attended Harvard Law School. In 1887 deliberately burned left hand (necessitating amputation) as self-punishment for having beaten another young man in fit of misguided jealousy after he had shown attention to Minna Timmins of Boston. Married Minna in 1889, and settled in New York; ₢ 3 33%3&-3.536;q<CqDKqLOqPZq[`qafqg333r3 &3'(3)/30233<3=B3CE3FS3TX3Yb3ci3jr3sw3x}3~3333333333333r3rrr33rr  33!3"(r2:rGOrU]r3333333  3 33$3%-3.3333333333Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, Bronson Alcott, James Russell Lowell, and especially Henry David Thoreau, whom he accompanied on trips to Cape Cod, Maine, and Canada, and on frequent excursions around Concord. (Wrote first biography of Thoreau, Thoreau, The Poet- Naturalist, 1873; edited a number of Thoreaus works in collaboration with Thoreaus sister Sophia.) Last years spent in the home of his friend Franklin B. Sanborn. Published verse collections Poems (1843), Poems, Second Series (1847), and The Woodman (1849), and book-length poems Near Home (1858), The Wanderer (1871), Eliot (1885), and John Brown and the Heroes of Harpers Ferry (1886). JOHN JAY CHAPMAN (March 2, 1862November 4, 1933) b. New York, New York. Son of Eleanor Jay and Henry Grafton Chapman. Graduated Harvard 1885; attended Harvard Law School. In 1887 deliberately burned left hand (necessitating amputation) as self-punishment for having beaten another young man in fit of misguided jealousy after he had shown attention to Minna Timmins of Boston. Married Minna in 1889, and settled in New York; 46 tled in New York CARD@!  s93725[Biographical Notes333 3(*3+031334738<3=A3BK3]refrlmp3q33333rrr333r!63<=3@X [q\] eqfg nqoxqy|q}30GP3QU3VZ3[b33rr*fr3333rrincreased sales. Suffered second stroke in 1888; in the same year published prose collection November Boughs and Complete Poems and Prose. Poems of his old age, Good-Bye My Fancy (1891), followed by final, so-called deathbed edition of Leaves of Grass. He had prepared an edition of his Complete Prose Works before his death in March 1892. JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER (December 17, 1807September 7, 1892) b. Haverhill, Massachusetts. Son of Abigail Hussey and John Whittier. Raised in devout Quaker household; little formal schooling. William Lloyd Garrisons Newburyport Free Press published poem The Exiles Departure in 1826; became friend of Garrison. Attended Haverhill Academy, 182728. Supported himself as shoemaker and schoolteacher. Edited American Manufacturer in Boston (1829) and Essex Gazette (1830) in Haverhill before becoming editor of the important New England Weekly Review (183032); formed friendship with Lydia Huntley Sigourney. Published Legends of New England in Prose and Verse (1831) and Moll Pitcher (1832). 333 3(*3+031334738<3=A3BK3]refrlmp3q33333rrr333r!63<=3@[q\eqfnqoxqy|q}30GP3QU3VZ3[b33rr*fr3333rrincreased sales. Suffered second stroke in 1888; in the same year published prose collection November Boughs and Complete Poems and Prose. Poems of his old age, Good-Bye My Fancy (1891), followed by final, so-called deathbed edition of Leaves of Grass. He had prepared an edition of his Complete Prose Works before his death in March 1892. JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER (December 17, 1807September 7, 1892) b. Haverhill, Massachusetts. Son of Abigail Hussey and John Whittier. Raised in devout Quaker household; little formal schooling. William Lloyd Garrisons Newburyport Free Press published poem The Exiles Departure in 1826; became friend of Garrison. Attended Haverhill Academy, 182728. Supported himself as shoemaker and schoolteacher. Edited American Manufacturer in Boston (1829) and Essex Gazette (1830) in Haverhill before becoming editor of the important New England Weekly Review (183032); formed friendship with Lydia Huntley Sigourney. Published Legends of New England in Prose and Verse (1831) and Moll Pitcher (1832). 4632).CARD@0 s93494[Biographical Notes,DqEGqHKqLPqQSqT_q`hqikql333333333r$3%*3+334637<3=B3CE3FO3PW3X93:=3>G3HJ3KS3wz3{333333333333333333333333"3#*3+132435738>3?D3EG3HO3ef3z33rr33333333333"3#'3MT3UX3Y`3am3support himself as itinerant portraitist, stayed with family briefly at new home in Pittsburgh; returned to Philadelphia in 1823 for two years of study at Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts. Wrote poetry and fiction, some published in Saturday Evening Post. Rejoined family in New York City in 1825, painting in their house on Greenwich Street. Made sketching trips to Weehawken, the Palisades, the Highlands, and elsewhere in Hudson River Valley. Met and received encouragement from artists John Trumbull, William Dunlap, and Asher B. Durand; rapidly achieved celebrity for paintings of American landscapes. Spent winters painting and exhibiting in New York City, his summers traveling and sketching in the Hudson Valley and elsewhere. As member of Bread and Cheese Club, associated with William Cullen Bryant, Samuel F. B. Morse, Asher B. Durand, James Fenimore Cooper; contributed art to Bryants periodical The Talisman. Traveled in Europe, 182932; in England, visited poet Samuel Rogers and painters Thomas Lawrence, J. M. W. Turner, John Constable, and John Martin; paintings exhibited at Royal Academy and British Institution. ,DqEGqHKqLPqQSqT_q`hqikql333333333r$3%*3+334637<3=B3CE3FO3PW3X93:=3>G3HJ3KS3wz3{333333333333333333333333"3#*3+132435738>3?D3EG3HO3ef3z33rr33333333333"3#'3MT3UX3Y`3am3support himself as itinerant portraitist, stayed with family briefly at new home in Pittsburgh; returned to Philadelphia in 1823 for two years of study at Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts. Wrote poetry and fiction, some published in Saturday Evening Post. Rejoined family in New York City in 1825, painting in their house on Greenwich Street. Made sketching trips to Weehawken, the Palisades, the Highlands, and elsewhere in Hudson River Valley. Met and received encouragement from artists John Trumbull, William Dunlap, and Asher B. Durand; rapidly achieved celebrity for paintings of American landscapes. Spent winters painting and exhibiting in New York City, his summers traveling and sketching in the Hudson Valley and elsewhere. As member of Bread and Cheese Club, associated with William Cullen Bryant, Samuel F. B. Morse, Asher B. Durand, James Fenimore Cooper; contributed art to Bryants periodical The Talisman. Traveled in Europe, 182932; in England, visited poet Samuel Rogers and painters Thomas Lawrence, J. M. W. Turner, John Constable, and John Martin; paintings exhibited at Royal Academy and British Institution. 46|s  @CARDBE@  s93595[Biographical Notes[s3t{3|3333333DqEHqISqTYqZ\q]eqfhqinqo|3}33333333333333 3 333)+3,03HQ3Rd3o33h3iu3v3333333333333333law practice with William Herndon as junior partner in 1844. Served one term as Whig congressman (184749); opposed Mexican War. Renewed involvement with politics after Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 repealed anti-slavery restriction in Missouri Compromise; spoke frequently against it and gained wide recognition. Helped found the Republican Party of Illinois in 1856. Campaigned in 1858 for U.S. Senate seat held by Democrat Stephen Douglas, author of the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and debated Douglas seven times on the slavery issue (debates were published in 1860 in edition prepared by Lincoln). Although Illinois legislature reelected Douglas to the Senate, campaign brought Lincoln national prominence in the Republican party. In February 1860 (after introduction by William Cullen Bryant) delivered address on slavery at Cooper Union in New York City. Received Republican presidential nomination in May and won election in fall with 180 of 303 electoral votes and 40 percent of popular vote; victory led to secession of seven Southern states. In early April 1861 sent naval expedition to provision Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor in South [s3t{3|3333333DqEHqISqTYqZ\q]eqfhqinqo|3}33333333333333 3 333)+3,03HQ3Rd3o33h3iu3v3333333333333333law practice with William Herndon as junior partner in 1844. Served one term as Whig congressman (184749); opposed Mexican War. Renewed involvement with politics after Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 repealed anti-slavery restriction in Missouri Compromise; spoke frequently against it and gained wide recognition. Helped found the Republican Party of Illinois in 1856. Campaigned in 1858 for U.S. Senate seat held by Democrat Stephen Douglas, author of the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and debated Douglas seven times on the slavery issue (debates were published in 1860 in edition prepared by Lincoln). Although Illinois legislature reelected Douglas to the Senate, campaign brought Lincoln national prominence in the Republican party. In February 1860 (after introduction by William Cullen Bryant) delivered address on slavery at Cooper Union in New York City. Received Republican presidential nomination in May and won election in fall with 180 of 303 electoral votes and 40 percent of popular vote; victory led to secession of seven Southern states. In early April 1861 sent naval expedition to provision Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor in South 46иs @CARDA@0 s93493[Biographical Notesꂺ3r*A3BE3FG3HQ3RW3Xrarr33333333333333333!3")3*,3-233;3<A3BF3GK3LN3OR3Sqqqqqqqq 3 3333 3 33#3$/30839@3AC3DI3JR3SU3VZ3[^3_d3ej3kw3x~3(3T`3333333333333333333play The Sons of Usna: a Tragi-Apotheosis (1854, published 1858), and a patriotic poem, Birth-Day Song of Liberty (1856). In 1853 published articles in The Waverley Magazine charging Poe with having plagiarized his work; heated tone of articles led to protracted controversy and attacks on Chivers by other writers. Spent much time in New York and Connecticut in later years. Returned to Georgia three years before his death, and moved from Washington to Decatur, where he died. THOMAS COLE (February 1, 1801February 11, 1848) b. Bolton-le-Moor, Lancashire, England, seventh of eight children of Mary and James Cole, unsuccessful woolen manufacturer. Attended school in Chester. From around 1815 worked in Liverpool as engravers assistant; became engraver of designs for calico. Immigrated with family to America in 1819. Worked as wood engraver in Philadelphia, where father opened dry goods shop. Traveled in St. Eustatius in West Indies, then rejoined family in Steubenville, Ohio, where he assisted father in manufacturing wallpaper. After unsuccessful attempts to ₲3r*A3BE3FG3HQ3RW3Xrarr33333333333333333!3")3*,3-233;3<A3BF3GK3LN3OR3Sqqqqqqqq33333 3 33#3$/30839@3AC3DI3JR3SU3VZ3[^3_d3ej3kw3x~3(3T`3333333333333333333play The Sons of Usna: a Tragi-Apotheosis (1854, published 1858), and a patriotic poem, Birth-Day Song of Liberty (1856). In 1853 published articles in The Waverley Magazine charging Poe with having plagiarized his work; heated tone of articles led to protracted controversy and attacks on Chivers by other writers. Spent much time in New York and Connecticut in later years. Returned to Georgia three years before his death, and moved from Washington to Decatur, where he died. THOMAS COLE (February 1, 1801February 11, 1848) b. Bolton-le-Moor, Lancashire, England, seventh of eight children of Mary and James Cole, unsuccessful woolen manufacturer. Attended school in Chester. From around 1815 worked in Liverpool as engravers assistant; became engraver of designs for calico. Immigrated with family to America in 1819. Worked as wood engraver in Philadelphia, where father opened dry goods shop. Traveled in St. Eustatius in West Indies, then rejoined family in Steubenville, Ohio, where he assisted father in manufacturing wallpaper. After unsuccessful attempts to 46CARD¸@0 8s93495[Biographical Notes3 3333 3!%3&,3-637:3;A3BE3FP3QU3V\3]_3`b3ch3il3~33333333333333Q3R[3\d3ei3jp3qs3ty3z}3~333333333333(3).3/738A3BG3HN3OQ3RY3Z\3]b3cg3hj3ks3tv3w{3|33333333 3 3 3333 3 3333 3 333Toured France and Italy; in Rome used Claude Lorrains old studio and associated with Samuel F. B. Morse and Horatio Greenough. Between 1833 and 1836 painted allegorical series The Course of Empire, praised as his masterpiece by Cooper and others. Married Maria Bartow in November 1836; settled in Catskill, New York. In 1840 completed four-part allegory The Voyage of Life and The Architects Dream, fanciful combination of Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Moorish, and Gothic styles. In 1841 traveled again to Europe, returning to Catskill the following year. Accepted Frederick Edwin Church as student in 1844. Died in Catskill of lung inflammation while working on uncompleted allegorical series The Cross and the World. PHILIP PENDLETON COOKE (October 26, 1816January 20, 1850) b. Martinsburg, Virginia (now West Virginia). Son of Maria Pendleton and John Rogers Cooke (a prominent lawyer); brother of novelist John Esten Cooke and cousin of novelist John Pendleton Kennedy. As undergraduate at Princeton, began writing poems that were published in 3 3333 3!%3&,3-637:3;A3BE3FP3QU3V\3]_3`b3ch3il3~33333333333333Q3R[3\d3ei3jp3qs3ty3z}3~333333333333(3).3/738A3BG3HN3OQ3RY3Z\3]b3cg3hj3ks3tv3w{3|33333333333333 3 3333 3 333Toured France and Italy; in Rome used Claude Lorrains old studio and associated with Samuel F. B. Morse and Horatio Greenough. Between 1833 and 1836 painted allegorical series The Course of Empire, praised as his masterpiece by Cooper and others. Married Maria Bartow in November 1836; settled in Catskill, New York. In 1840 completed four-part allegory The Voyage of Life and The Architects Dream, fanciful combination of Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Moorish, and Gothic styles. In 1841 traveled again to Europe, returning to Catskill the following year. Accepted Frederick Edwin Church as student in 1844. Died in Catskill of lung inflammation while working on uncompleted allegorical series The Cross and the World. PHILIP PENDLETON COOKE (October 26, 1816January 20, 1850) b. Martinsburg, Virginia (now West Virginia). Son of Maria Pendleton and John Rogers Cooke (a prominent lawyer); brother of novelist John Esten Cooke and cousin of novelist John Pendleton Kennedy. As undergraduate at Princeton, began writing poems that were published in 46n Esten n EsCARD-;@0  s93497[Biographical Notesɂ30Z ]3^_ c3de i3js3tw3x333333333333333333333e3tu333333333333333333333IS3T[3\^3_d3em3ny3z~333333333333333333333r%&r./435<3=?3@D3E333pursuit apart from writing was hunting. Died of pneumonia contracted on a hunting trip. ROSE TERRY COOKE (February 17, 1827July 18, 1892) b. West Hartford, Connecticut. Elder of two daughters of Anne Hurlbut and Henry Wadsworth Terry. At age six, moved with family into the Wadsworth mansion, owned by paternal grandmother, in Hartford. Educated Hartford Female Seminary, graduating 1843; officially joined Congregational Church. Taught briefly in Hartford and then for four years at a Presbyterian church school in Burlington, New Jersey, where she also worked as governess for the ministers family. In 1848, received inheritance from a great uncle, which enabled her to devote herself to writing poetry and fiction, and to establish a home in Hartford. In 1852, began publishing poems in the New-York Tribune, where Charles A. Dana was editor. Beginning in 1855though earlier stories may have appeared pseudonymouslyCooke published short stories in various periodicals, including Harpers, Putnams, The Galaxy, and Atlantic Monthly, whose 30]3^c3di3js3tw3x333333333333333333333e3tu333333333333333333333IS3T[3\^3_d3em3ny3z~333333333333333333333r%&r./435<3=?3@D3E333pursuit apart from writing was hunting. Died of pneumonia contracted on a hunting trip. ROSE TERRY COOKE (February 17, 1827July 18, 1892) b. West Hartford, Connecticut. Elder of two daughters of Anne Hurlbut and Henry Wadsworth Terry. At age six, moved with family into the Wadsworth mansion, owned by paternal grandmother, in Hartford. Educated Hartford Female Seminary, graduating 1843; officially joined Congregational Church. Taught briefly in Hartford and then for four years at a Presbyterian church school in Burlington, New Jersey, where she also worked as governess for the ministers family. In 1848, received inheritance from a great uncle, which enabled her to devote herself to writing poetry and fiction, and to establish a home in Hartford. In 1852, began publishing poems in the New-York Tribune, where Charles A. Dana was editor. Beginning in 1855though earlier stories may have appeared pseudonymouslyCooke published short stories in various periodicals, including Harpers, Putnams, The Galaxy, and Atlantic Monthly, whose 46s mahose CARDwu@  4s93499[Biographical Notes   :3;=3>H3IQ3RT3lqqqqqqqq3333333QqRTqU_q`iqjnqoxqy33333333333 3333&q'0q19q:BqCEqFNqO 3 33"3#+3,435:3BC3IJ3LM3TUXY`akl 3GCHRISTOPHER PEARSE CRANCH (March 8, 1813January 20, 1892) b. Arlington, Virginia (then part of District of Columbia). Son of Anna Greenleaf and William Cranch (a federal judge and Supreme Court reporter); aunt, Rebecca Greenleaf, was married to Noah Webster; grandmother, Mary Smith, was sister of Abigail Adams. Received early training as draftsman. Graduated from Columbian College (now George Washington University) in 1831 and from Harvard Divinity School in 1835 (classmates included Charles Timothy Brooks and Theodore Parker). As an itinerant Unitarian minister preached in Andover, Bangor, and Portland, Maine, and in Boston, Richmond, St. Louis (home of cousin William Greenleaf Eliot, grandfather of T. S. Eliot), Cincinnati, Peoria, Louisville, and elsewhere. While preaching in Louisville, 1837-38, assisted James Freeman Clarke in editing The Western Messenger, Unitarian journal associated with the Transcendentalists, to which he contributed poetry and articles. In Boston in 1840, met Emerson (who published some of his poems in The Dial) and became frequent visitor at utopian community Brook Farm. Married a cousin, Elizabeth de r:3;=3>H3IQ3RT3lqqqqqqqq3333333QqRTqU_q`iqjnqoxqy33333333333 3333&q'0q19q:BqCEqFNqO 3 33"3#+3,435:3BC3IJ3LM3TUXY`akl 3GCHRISTOPHER PEARSE CRANCH (March 8, 1813January 20, 1892) b. Arlington, Virginia (then part of District of Columbia). Son of Anna Greenleaf and William Cranch (a federal judge and Supreme Court reporter); aunt, Rebecca Greenleaf, was married to Noah Webster; grandmother, Mary Smith, was sister of Abigail Adams. Received early training as draftsman. Graduated from Columbian College (now George Washington University) in 1831 and from Harvard Divinity School in 1835 (classmates included Charles Timothy Brooks and Theodore Parker). As an itinerant Unitarian minister preached in Andover, Bangor, and Portland, Maine, and in Boston, Richmond, St. Louis (home of cousin William Greenleaf Eliot, grandfather of T. S. Eliot), Cincinnati, Peoria, Louisville, and elsewhere. While preaching in Louisville, 1837-38, assisted James Freeman Clarke in editing The Western Messenger, Unitarian journal associated with the Transcendentalists, to which he contributed poetry and articles. In Boston in 1840, met Emerson (who published some of his poems in The Dial) and became frequent visitor at utopian community Brook Farm. Married a cousin, Elizabeth de 46̨sin, Elizabeth d`CARDa@ s93502[Biographical Notesrr  rrrr !'3(+3,r/0r23r78t3u}3~33333333333333333333333333!3")3*.3/233:3;@3AJ3KQqRWqX[q\aqbfqgkqlsqt|q}q3333333333333333333aqbhqimqnpqquqvxqy}q~qqB3CJ3KO3P\3]e3frijrnorstrwxr}~rrr3rr3rrrrr33rr333 3  3333 %3&The Black Riders and Other Lines (1895) and War Is Kind (1899). As syndicated newswriter, traveled to Mexico and the American West in 1895. In 1896, traveled by way of Florida to cover Cuban Revolution; met Cora Howorth Steward, proprietor of Hotel de Dream in Jacksonville. Shipwrecked in January 1897 off Florida coast (incident became basis for story The Open Boat). Traveled to Greece (where he was joined by Cora) to cover Greek-Turkish War; he and Cora traveled to England as husband and wife in 1897; friends in England included Joseph Conrad, Henry James, Ford Madox Ford, Harold Frederic, and H. G. Wells. Went to Cuba in 1898 to cover Spanish-American War. In 1899 Crane and Cora returned to England where they rented ancient manor house Brede Place in Sussex. Continued to publish articles, stories, and poems despite ill health; last publications included The Open Boat and Other Tales of Adventure (1898), Active Service (1899), The Monster and Other Stories (1899), and Whilomville Stories (1900). Died of tuberculosis at sanatorium in the Black Forest, Germany. rr  rrrr !'3(+3,r/0r23r78t3u}3~33333333333333333333333333!3")3*.3/233:3;@3AJ3KQqRWqX[q\aqbfqgkqlsqt|q}q3333333333333333333aqbhqimqnpqquqvxqy}q~qqB3CJ3KO3P\3]e3frijrnorstrwxr}~rrr3rr3rrrrr33rr333 3  3333 %3&The Black Riders and Other Lines (1895) and War Is Kind (1899). As syndicated newswriter, traveled to Mexico and the American West in 1895. In 1896, traveled by way of Florida to cover Cuban Revolution; met Cora Howorth Steward, proprietor of Hotel de Dream in Jacksonville. Shipwrecked in January 1897 off Florida coast (incident became basis for story The Open Boat). Traveled to Greece (where he was joined by Cora) to cover Greek-Turkish War; he and Cora traveled to England as husband and wife in 1897; friends in England included Joseph Conrad, Henry James, Ford Madox Ford, Harold Frederic, and H. G. Wells. Went to Cuba in 1898 to cover Spanish-American War. In 1899 Crane and Cora returned to England where they rented ancient manor house Brede Place in Sussex. Continued to publish articles, stories, and poems despite ill health; last publications included The Open Boat and Other Tales of Adventure (1898), Active Service (1899), The Monster and Other Stories (1899), and Whilomville Stories (1900). Died of tuberculosis at sanatorium in the Black Forest, Germany. 46har `CARD zc@  s93505[Biographical NotesuN3rL 3 33333333333333 3 333"3#+3,/30637@3AK3LR3SV3W\3]c3df3gl3m333333333333333333333333 3 3#3$,3-536839?3@E3FI3J33333331849 and 1850 and publication of second edition of Poems and Prose Writings (1850), spent later life in retirement in Boston, Cambridge, and Cape Ann. EMILY DICKINSON (December 10, 1830May 15, 1886) b. Emily Elizabeth Dickinson in Amherst, Massachusetts. Second of three children of Emily Norcross and Edward Dickinson (prominent lawyer who later served as state senator and national congressman); paternal grandfather Samuel Fowler Dickinson was a founder of Amherst College; siblings were older brother William Austin and younger sister Lavinia. Educated at Amherst Academy, 184046. In 1844 spent a month in Boston with mothers sister Lavinia to recover from ill health and depression following death of friend Sophia Holland. Attended Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in South Hadley, Massachusetts, 184748. Returned to family home, the Homestead, and lived there permanently, rarely leaving except for trips to Washington (where her father was serving a term in Congress) and Philadelphia in 1855 and in 186465 to Boston and Concord (where she spent seven mF3rL333333333333333 3 333"3#+3,/30637@3AK3LR3SV3W\3]c3df3gl3m333333333333333333333333 3 3#3$,3-536839?3@E3FI3J33333331849 and 1850 and publication of second edition of Poems and Prose Writings (1850), spent later life in retirement in Boston, Cambridge, and Cape Ann. EMILY DICKINSON (December 10, 1830May 15, 1886) b. Emily Elizabeth Dickinson in Amherst, Massachusetts. Second of three children of Emily Norcross and Edward Dickinson (prominent lawyer who later served as state senator and national congressman); paternal grandfather Samuel Fowler Dickinson was a founder of Amherst College; siblings were older brother William Austin and younger sister Lavinia. Educated at Amherst Academy, 184046. In 1844 spent a month in Boston with mothers sister Lavinia to recover from ill health and depression following death of friend Sophia Holland. Attended Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in South Hadley, Massachusetts, 184748. Returned to family home, the Homestead, and lived there permanently, rarely leaving except for trips to Washington (where her father was serving a term in Congress) and Philadelphia in 1855 and in 186465 to Boston and Concord (where she spent seven 46CARD~@|] *s91265[William Ellery ChanningVnVoVI need another soul to part These brows of steel and join in prayer. Sails there no bark on lifes wild sea That bears a soul whose faith has set, Who may renew my light in me, And both shall thus the past forget? VnVoVI need another soul to part These brows of steel and join in prayer. Sails there no bark on lifes wild sea That bears a soul whose faith has set, Who may renew my light in me, And both shall thus the past forget? 2t From plates that on the @CARD @5  s93520[Biographical Notesꂊ33 3 333!3"+3,233536t33333qqqqqqq qq33%3&(3)334:3;=3>J3K333333333333333333(q)2q35q6>q?HqIKqLTqUZq[^q_cqd33333333333   qqqqq'q(/3Is a Hard Road to Travel. Emmett performed widely as actor and musician with various ensembles. Around 1852 married Catherine Rives. In 1858 joined the Bryant Minstrels, for whom in 1859 he composed Dixies Land (Dixie); played in 1861 at inauguration of Jefferson Davis, song was adopted as unofficial anthem of Confederacy. Emmett songs performed with Bryant Minstrels included The Road to Richmond and Here We Are, or Cross Ober Jordan; toured with them sporadically until 1866. Settled in Chicago in 1867; managed a saloon there, 1872 74; continued to perform, primarily as fiddler, until the late 1870s. Wife Catherine died in 1875; married Mary Louise Bird in 1879. Money raised for him in public benefits in 1880 and 1882; toured with Leavitts Gigantean Minstrels, 188182. In 1888 retired to Mount Vernon, Ohio, where he lived in relative poverty, assisted by stipend from Actors Fund of America. Made final tour in the South, 189596. THOMAS DUNN ENGLISH (June 29, 1819April 1, 1902) b. in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Son of Robert English. Family were Irish Quakers, their original name Angelos. ҂r33 3 333!3"+3,233536t33333qqqqqqq qq33%3&(3)334:3;=3>J3K333333333333333333(q)2q35q6>q?HqIKqLTqUZq[^q_cqd33333333333qqqqq'q(/3Is a Hard Road to Travel. Emmett performed widely as actor and musician with various ensembles. Around 1852 married Catherine Rives. In 1858 joined the Bryant Minstrels, for whom in 1859 he composed Dixies Land (Dixie); played in 1861 at inauguration of Jefferson Davis, song was adopted as unofficial anthem of Confederacy. Emmett songs performed with Bryant Minstrels included The Road to Richmond and Here We Are, or Cross Ober Jordan; toured with them sporadically until 1866. Settled in Chicago in 1867; managed a saloon there, 1872 74; continued to perform, primarily as fiddler, until the late 1870s. Wife Catherine died in 1875; married Mary Louise Bird in 1879. Money raised for him in public benefits in 1880 and 1882; toured with Leavitts Gigantean Minstrels, 188182. In 1888 retired to Mount Vernon, Ohio, where he lived in relative poverty, assisted by stipend from Actors Fund of America. Made final tour in the South, 189596. THOMAS DUNN ENGLISH (June 29, 1819April 1, 1902) b. in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Son of Robert English. Family were Irish Quakers, their original name Angelos. 46ofnal name AngelosCARD ^@5 Ts93523[Biographical Notes~3333-3/036EqFLqMRqSVqW^q_bqceqfiqjv3w3333333333333333333 3 3333 %3&)3*-3.33493:A3BL3Mqqqqqqqq333333333qqqqqqqqqqq3333333333#3$'3(-3.03193:D3EG3HN3OQ3dh3iq3rx3y}3~3333333334<3=G3HK3LS3333United States in 1838 and eventually settled in Salem, Massachusetts; taught piano and married one of his pupils, Mary Silsbee, daughter of prominent mercantile family. Fenollosa attended Harvard and studied work of Hegel and Herbert Spencer with enthusiasm. Graduated first in class of 1874, and was class poet; awarded fellowship enabling him to continue studies at Cambridge University in England, where he specialized in philosophy and, briefly, divinity. Shifted studies to art in 1877, attending newly founded school at Boston Museum of Fine Arts. Married Lizzie Goodhue Millett in June 1878; they had a son and a daughter. Under arrangement made by Edward Sylvester Morse, went to Japan in 1878, remaining there for 12 years, for the first eight of which he taught political economy, philosophy, and logic at Imperial University in Tokyo. In close association with Japanese artist Kano Hogai, encouraged preservation and cultivation of traditional Japanese art practices imperiled by Westernization. With Morse and wealthy Bostonian collector William Sturgis Bigelow, traveled throughout the country examining pottery, sculpture, and paintings; with Bigelows ~3333-3/036EqFLqMRqSVqW^q_bqceqfiqjv3w3333333333333333333 3 3333 %3&)3*-3.33493:A3BL3Mqqqqqqqq333333333qqqqqqqqqqq3333333333#3$'3(-3.03193:D3EG3HN3OQ3dh3iq3rx3y}3~3333333334<3=G3HK3LS3333United States in 1838 and eventually settled in Salem, Massachusetts; taught piano and married one of his pupils, Mary Silsbee, daughter of prominent mercantile family. Fenollosa attended Harvard and studied work of Hegel and Herbert Spencer with enthusiasm. Graduated first in class of 1874, and was class poet; awarded fellowship enabling him to continue studies at Cambridge University in England, where he specialized in philosophy and, briefly, divinity. Shifted studies to art in 1877, attending newly founded school at Boston Museum of Fine Arts. Married Lizzie Goodhue Millett in June 1878; they had a son and a daughter. Under arrangement made by Edward Sylvester Morse, went to Japan in 1878, remaining there for 12 years, for the first eight of which he taught political economy, philosophy, and logic at Imperial University in Tokyo. In close association with Japanese artist Kano Hogai, encouraged preservation and cultivation of traditional Japanese art practices imperiled by Westernization. With Morse and wealthy Bostonian collector William Sturgis Bigelow, traveled throughout the country examining pottery, sculpture, and paintings; with Bigelows 46Japanese a with CARD a!@  ts93529[Biographical Notes&y3z}3~33333333-3h  3333333 3 333%3KL3MT3U]3^g3ho3p{3|33333333333333333333333333333331899 became president of New York State Bar Association. Of his literary career, he commented: My whole life as a lawyer has been a battle against literary longings. I have kept the most earnest part of my nature in chains. I fear I have done it so long as to make full liberty dangerous to me. Late in life edited collected poems, published posthumously as The Blue and the Gray and Other Verses (1909). STEPHEN FOSTER (July 4, 1826January 13, 1864) b. Stephen Collins Foster in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Ninth of ten children of Eliza Clayland Tomlinson and merchant William Barclay Foster. Educated Allegheny Academy (Allegheny, Pennsylvania), and Athens Academy (Tioga Point, Pennsylvania). Briefly attended Jefferson College (Canonsburg, Pennsylvania) in July 1841; education continued in Pittsburgh by tutors. Began to compose at an early age; published first song, Open Thy Lattice, Love in 1844. Family, objecting to musical career, sent him to Cincinnati in 1846 to work as bookkeeper for brother Dunning Foster. A number of his songs were published in y3z}3~33333333-3h3333333 3 333%3KL3MT3U]3^g3ho3p{3|33333333333333333333333333333331899 became president of New York State Bar Association. Of his literary career, he commented: My whole life as a lawyer has been a battle against literary longings. I have kept the most earnest part of my nature in chains. I fear I have done it so long as to make full liberty dangerous to me. Late in life edited collected poems, published posthumously as The Blue and the Gray and Other Verses (1909). STEPHEN FOSTER (July 4, 1826January 13, 1864) b. Stephen Collins Foster in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Ninth of ten children of Eliza Clayland Tomlinson and merchant William Barclay Foster. Educated Allegheny Academy (Allegheny, Pennsylvania), and Athens Academy (Tioga Point, Pennsylvania). Briefly attended Jefferson College (Canonsburg, Pennsylvania) in July 1841; education continued in Pittsburgh by tutors. Began to compose at an early age; published first song, Open Thy Lattice, Love in 1844. Family, objecting to musical career, sent him to Cincinnati in 1846 to work as bookkeeper for brother Dunning Foster. A number of his songs were published in 46-1urn -1 @CARDv@  s93535[Biographical Notesg3 3 33#3-334t3uw3x~33333333qqqqqqqq!33738>3?F3GI3JO3P33%Jrd33333 33$,r-.6q7AqBNqOUqVYqZ`qal3my3z3333333333C3DF3GL3French, and Italian. Made intensive study of German literature; close friend of James Freeman Clarke. Family settled in Groton when father took up farming in 1833. Following fathers death in 1835, taught for several months at Bronson Alcotts Temple School in Boston; left due to Alcotts inability to pay her. Became teacher at Hiram Fullers Greene-Street School in Providence, Rhode Island (183638); formed friendship with Sarah Helen Whitman. Moved to Boston area, where she taught privately; contributed essays to Clarkes Western Messenger; published translation of Eckermamls Conversations with Goethe (1839). Conducted successful womens education program of conversations focusing on philosophy, education, and womens rights, 183944. Close friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson; became editor of The Dial, 184042, frequently contributing essays and poems. Friends and intellectual associates in Boston and Cambridge included George Ripley, Theodore Parker, Caroline Sturgis, William Henry Channing, and many others. Greatly impressed by meeting with English writer Harriet Martineau in 1835; occasionally visited Brook Farm g3 3 33#3-334t3uw3x~33333333qqqqqqqq!33738>3?F3GI3JO3P33%Jrd33333 33$,r-.6q7AqBNqOUqVYqZ`qal3my3z3333333333C3DF3GL3French, and Italian. Made intensive study of German literature; close friend of James Freeman Clarke. Family settled in Groton when father took up farming in 1833. Following fathers death in 1835, taught for several months at Bronson Alcotts Temple School in Boston; left due to Alcotts inability to pay her. Became teacher at Hiram Fullers Greene-Street School in Providence, Rhode Island (183638); formed friendship with Sarah Helen Whitman. Moved to Boston area, where she taught privately; contributed essays to Clarkes Western Messenger; published translation of Eckermamls Conversations with Goethe (1839). Conducted successful womens education program of conversations focusing on philosophy, education, and womens rights, 183944. Close friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson; became editor of The Dial, 184042, frequently contributing essays and poems. Friends and intellectual associates in Boston and Cambridge included George Ripley, Theodore Parker, Caroline Sturgis, William Henry Channing, and many others. Greatly impressed by meeting with English writer Harriet Martineau in 1835; occasionally visited Brook Farm 46 CARD@  @s93536[Biographical Notesv3wy3z33333333rrrrr3333qqqqqqq qqr#$*3+334637=3>D3EI3JO3PV3W_3`h3in3orturwxr{|rr33333333r33+r>G33D3EM3NQ3RY3Za3bi3jp3community beginning in 1841. Sister Ellen married poet William Ellery Channing in 1841. In the summer of 1843 traveled in Illinois and Wisconsin; her account of the journey, A Summer on the Lakes (1844), led to invitation from Horace Greeley to serve as literary critic for New-York Tribune. During vacation In Hudson Valley with close friend Caroline Sturgis, wrote Woman in the Nineteenth Century (published 1845). Moved to New York in 1844; lived for a time in Greeley household; literary associates in New York included Lydia Maria Child, Anne Lynch, Christopher Pearse Cranch, Cornelius Mathews, William Gilmore Simms, and Evert Duyckinck. Criticism collected in Papers on Literature and Art (1846). Sailed to Europe in the summer of 1846; wrote for Tribune as foreign correspondent (articles reprinted in At Home and Abroad in 1856). In England met Thomas Carlyle, William Wordsworth, Thomas De Quincey, and Italian revolutionary leader Giuseppe Mazzini; in France, George Sand, Pierre de Beranger, and Polish poet Adam Mickiewicz. In Italy, associated with Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning and artists William Wetmore Story, v3wy3z33333333rrrrr3333qqqqqqq qqr#$*3+334637=3>D3EI3JO3PV3W_3`h3in3orturwxr{|rr33333333r33+r>G33D3EM3NQ3RY3Za3bi3jp3community beginning in 1841. Sister Ellen married poet William Ellery Channing in 1841. In the summer of 1843 traveled in Illinois and Wisconsin; her account of the journey, A Summer on the Lakes (1844), led to invitation from Horace Greeley to serve as literary critic for New-York Tribune. During vacation In Hudson Valley with close friend Caroline Sturgis, wrote Woman in the Nineteenth Century (published 1845). Moved to New York in 1844; lived for a time in Greeley household; literary associates in New York included Lydia Maria Child, Anne Lynch, Christopher Pearse Cranch, Cornelius Mathews, William Gilmore Simms, and Evert Duyckinck. Criticism collected in Papers on Literature and Art (1846). Sailed to Europe in the summer of 1846; wrote for Tribune as foreign correspondent (articles reprinted in At Home and Abroad in 1856). In England met Thomas Carlyle, William Wordsworth, Thomas De Quincey, and Italian revolutionary leader Giuseppe Mazzini; in France, George Sand, Pierre de Beranger, and Polish poet Adam Mickiewicz. In Italy, associated with Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning and artists William Wetmore Story, 46 CARD/@  s93540[Biographical NotesW2rr  rr3r r&'r,-435839r?@rHIrST[3\a3bd3eh3im3nr3su3v{3333r3$3%*3+031738:3;B3CE3FS3Trr333r33r3333rrrrr  3!" '3() .3/839;3<I3Jqqqqqq333 3 3Tyranny of the Dark (1905), The Shadow World (1908), and Victor Ollnees Discipline (1911). Moved to New York City in 1916. Consulted by friend Theodore Roosevelt on federal policy toward American Indians; stories on Indian themes collected in The Book of the American Indian (1923). In later years wrote series of volumes of autobiography and family history, of which the most successful were A Son of the Middle Border (1917) and A Daughter of the Middle Border (1922), for which he won the Pulitzer Prize. Roadside Meetings (1930) initiated series of literary memoirs based on diaries. Moved in 1930 to Los Angeles, California. Later poems collected in Iowa, O Iowa! (1935); occult studies summarized in Forty Years of Psychic Research (1940) and The Mystery of the Buried Crosses (1939). RICHARD WATSON GILDER (February 8, 1844November 18, 1909) b. Bordentown, New Jersey. Son of Jane Nutt and William Henry Gilder, Methodist minister who conducted Belle Vue Female Seminary in Bordentown. In Gilders early years, family moved often, as father served as K&rr  rr3r r&'r,-435839r?@rHIrST[3\a3bd3eh3im3nr3su3v{3333r3$3%*3+031738:3;B3CE3FS3Trr333r33r3333rrrrr 3!'3(.3/839;3<I3Jqqqqqq333 3 3Tyranny of the Dark (1905), The Shadow World (1908), and Victor Ollnees Discipline (1911). Moved to New York City in 1916. Consulted by friend Theodore Roosevelt on federal policy toward American Indians; stories on Indian themes collected in The Book of the American Indian (1923). In later years wrote series of volumes of autobiography and family history, of which the most successful were A Son of the Middle Border (1917) and A Daughter of the Middle Border (1922), for which he won the Pulitzer Prize. Roadside Meetings (1930) initiated series of literary memoirs based on diaries. Moved in 1930 to Los Angeles, California. Later poems collected in Iowa, O Iowa! (1935); occult studies summarized in Forty Years of Psychic Research (1940) and The Mystery of the Buried Crosses (1939). RICHARD WATSON GILDER (February 8, 1844November 18, 1909) b. Bordentown, New Jersey. Son of Jane Nutt and William Henry Gilder, Methodist minister who conducted Belle Vue Female Seminary in Bordentown. In Gilders early years, family moved often, as father served as 46stylten, CARD@"H  ps93749[Biographical NotesG3HJ3KO3PV3W^3_a3bg3hm33333333333333r333-.3/738:3;?3@I3JL3MU3V333333 33!35rrrrr-5rQmrrHeidelberg and Paris. Practiced medicine in West Chester, Pennsylvania. In 1862 became surgeon in Union Army; served at battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg; suffered sunstroke in 1863 and was restricted to work at army hospital in Quincy, Illinois. After leaving the army in 1865 married Sarah Tillson; resumed medical practice in West Chester. Moved to Philadelphia in 1867 to work on staff of The Medical and Surgical Reporter, of which he became editor in 1874. Professor of ethnology and archaeology at Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, 188486; in 1886 professor of American linguistics and archaeology at University of Pennsylvania. Retired from medicine in 1887 to devote himself to research. In the eight volumes of his Library of Aboriginal American Literature (188290) was first to undertake systematic publication of translations of American Indian texts. Anthropological studies included The Myths of the New World (1868), American Hero-Myths (1882), Aboriginal American Authors and Their Productions (1883), The Lenape and Their Legends (1884), A Lenape-English Dictionary (1888, with A. S. Anthony), Essays of an Americanist (1890), The G3HJ3KO3PV3W^3_a3bg3hm33333333333333r333-.3/738:3;?3@I3JL3MU3V333333 33!35rrrrr-5rQmrrHeidelberg and Paris. Practiced medicine in West Chester, Pennsylvania. In 1862 became surgeon in Union Army; served at battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg; suffered sunstroke in 1863 and was restricted to work at army hospital in Quincy, Illinois. After leaving the army in 1865 married Sarah Tillson; resumed medical practice in West Chester. Moved to Philadelphia in 1867 to work on staff of The Medical and Surgical Reporter, of which he became editor in 1874. Professor of ethnology and archaeology at Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, 188486; in 1886 professor of American linguistics and archaeology at University of Pennsylvania. Retired from medicine in 1887 to devote himself to research. In the eight volumes of his Library of Aboriginal American Literature (188290) was first to undertake systematic publication of translations of American Indian texts. Anthropological studies included The Myths of the New World (1868), American Hero-Myths (1882), Aboriginal American Authors and Their Productions (1883), The Lenape and Their Legends (1884), A Lenape-English Dictionary (1888, with A. S. Anthony), Essays of an Americanist (1890), The 46 )sha ) CARD@: s93551[Biographical NotesԃN33 333$3%'3(031536<3JQ3RW3XZ3[^3_i3jp3qs3t~33rrr33333333333 3 3 3!)3*536:3;>3?H3IQ3RY3Z^3_e3fm3ns3tv3w~33333333333333333333333 3333333333r333333rrrr rr33 r)*r01r45rB^roQrUerijrmnrs}360 Wiyot Indians on Gunthers Island in February 1860 forced him to leave Arcata. Moved to San Francisco; worked as typesetter for The Golden Era and contributed many items to paper including column Town and Table Talk and first major short story, The Work on Red Mountain. Cultivated personal connections with San Francisco society, notably with Jessie Frmont (wife of General John C. Frmont) and minister Thomas Starr King; obtained job as clerk in surveyor-generals office. Married Anna Griswold of New York in 1862; they had four children (born between 1865 and 1875). The following year switched to job in new U.S. Mint, where he worked for six years. Edited local poetry anthology Outcroppings (1866); published collections of prose sketches, The Lost Galleon and Other Tales (1867) and Condensed Novels and Other Papers (1867). Appointed editor of Overland Monthly in 1868, attracting national attention with his short stories The Luck of Roaring Camp (1868) and The Outcasts of Poker Flat (1869). Publication in 1870 of humorous poem Plain Language from Truthful James and collection The Luck of Roaring Camp and Other Sketches made him ԃN33 333$3%'3(031536<3JQ3RW3XZ3[^3_i3jp3qs3t~33rrr33333333333 3 3 3!)3*536:3;>3?H3IQ3RY3Z^3_e3fm3ns3tv3w~33333333333333333333333 3333333333r333333rrrr rr33 r)*r01r45rB^roQrUerijrmnrs}360 Wiyot Indians on Gunthers Island in February 1860 forced him to leave Arcata. Moved to San Francisco; worked as typesetter for The Golden Era and contributed many items to paper including column Town and Table Talk and first major short story, The Work on Red Mountain. Cultivated personal connections with San Francisco society, notably with Jessie Frmont (wife of General John C. Frmont) and minister Thomas Starr King; obtained job as clerk in surveyor-generals office. Married Anna Griswold of New York in 1862; they had four children (born between 1865 and 1875). The following year switched to job in new U.S. Mint, where he worked for six years. Edited local poetry anthology Outcroppings (1866); published collections of prose sketches, The Lost Galleon and Other Tales (1867) and Condensed Novels and Other Papers (1867). Appointed editor of Overland Monthly in 1868, attracting national attention with his short stories The Luck of Roaring Camp (1868) and The Outcasts of Poker Flat (1869). Publication in 1870 of humorous poem Plain Language from Truthful James and collection The Luck of Roaring Camp and Other Sketches made him 46p an CARDm@:  |s93553[Biographical Notes"3 3333"#3%&3./j3ko3pu3v{3|3333333#3$'3(23363793:@3AE3FJ3KM3NX3Y`3aj3km3nr3su3qqqqqqqq333333 33 q!)q*,q-4q5:q;?q@BqCmrrrrrr (rAIraappointment by Rutherford B. Hayes to American consulate in Krefeld, Prussia, and went to Germany alone in July 1878; while officially serving there, spent much time in London. In London acquaintances included Henry James, George Du Maurier, Thomas Hardy; formed close friendship with Arthur and Marguerite Van de Velde, with whom he frequently stayed. Appointed in 1880 to U.S. consulate in Glasgow; dismissed in 1885 for inattention to duty. Settled permanently in London, living with the Van de Veldes; wrote prolifically, supporting himself entirely by writing after loss of consular job. Later publications included Flip and Other Stories (1882), On the Frontier (1884), By Shore and Sedge (1885), Maruja (1885), The Queen of the Pirate Isle (1886), The Heritage of Dedlow Marsh and Other Tales (1889), In a Hollow of the Hills (1895), Tales of Trail and Town (1898), and many other works. Wife Anna came to England (where their son Frank had settled five years earlier) in 1898; they saw each other occasionally but never again lived together. "3 3333"#3%&3./j3ko3pu3v{3|3333333#3$'3(23363793:@3AE3FJ3KM3NX3Y`3aj3km3nr3su3qqqqqqqq333333 33 q!)q*,q-4q5:q;?q@BqCmrrrrrr (rAIraappointment by Rutherford B. Hayes to American consulate in Krefeld, Prussia, and went to Germany alone in July 1878; while officially serving there, spent much time in London. In London acquaintances included Henry James, George Du Maurier, Thomas Hardy; formed close friendship with Arthur and Marguerite Van de Velde, with whom he frequently stayed. Appointed in 1880 to U.S. consulate in Glasgow; dismissed in 1885 for inattention to duty. Settled permanently in London, living with the Van de Veldes; wrote prolifically, supporting himself entirely by writing after loss of consular job. Later publications included Flip and Other Stories (1882), On the Frontier (1884), By Shore and Sedge (1885), Maruja (1885), The Queen of the Pirate Isle (1886), The Heritage of Dedlow Marsh and Other Tales (1889), In a Hollow of the Hills (1895), Tales of Trail and Town (1898), and many other works. Wife Anna came to England (where their son Frank had settled five years earlier) in 1898; they saw each other occasionally but never again lived together. 46d{TH`CARD=@ "s93559[Biographical NotesvE3FL3MU3V`3ae3fk3ls3ty3z~333rr333rrrrr  r3r!"r+,536=3>@3A~3333333333333333333333 3 333$r,-r56>3N3rr3333rr+r23r45r;<r>?rBQ[3\b3vw3333a U.S. senator. At Christopher Cotes Classical School in Charleston, formed enduring friendship with Henry Timrod. First poem published in Charleston Courier in 1845; continued to contribute verse to magazines including Southern Literary Messenger, Southern Literary Gazette, and Grahams Magazine. Graduated College of Charleston in 1850. Studied law with prominent attorney James L. Petigru; admitted to bar 1852. Married Mary Middleton Michel in 1852 (their son William was born in 1856). Worked as assistant editor and then editor of Southern Literary Gazette, 185254. A member, with William Gilmore Simms, of group of Southern writers who gathered at John Russells bookstore in Charleston; edited Russells Magazine, 185760. First collections of versePoems (1855), Sonnets and Other Poems (1857), and Avolio: A Legend of the Island of Cos (1860)won praise from Holmes, Bryant, and Longfellow. Served as aide-de-camp to South Carolina governor Francis Pickens for four months in 186162; fell ill and was removed from active service; wrote martial lyrics in defense of Southern cause. Home destroyed in the war. Moved in July 1865 to 46 CharlCARD"j* ,-BCbcyz~  '(/0;<IJstJOHN ROLLIN RIDGE (18271867) Mount Shasta A Cherokee Love Song The Rainy Season in California The Stolen White Girl from California JOHN TOWNSEND TROWBRIDGE (18271916) An Idyl of Harvest Time Recollections of Lalla Rookh Circumstance The Old Lobsterman HENRY TIMROD (18281867) Dreams Retirement Ethnogenesis I know not why, but all this weary day The Cotton Boll La Belle Juive Carolina a2135 2135 2139 2141 2146 2147 2150 2150 2154 2161 2162 2169 2169 2171 2173 2179 2180 2188 2191 amerbg.pct*44449619th-Century American Poetsd0op CARDCARD@7! V.x`chapter titleon mousedown showcontents end mousedownPw) overheadon mousedown showcontents end mousedown8s New Chapter Carlos Wilcox Carlos Wilcox Carlos Wilcox9224[Carlos Wilcoxf9  > "V#qq q  qqqq #q$)u, from The Age of Benevolence A sultry noon, not in the summers prime When all is fresh with life, and youth, and bloom, But near its close when vegetation stops, And fruits mature, stand ripening in the sun, Sooths and enervates with its thousand charms, Its images of silence and of rest, The melancholy mind. The fields are still; The husbandman has gone to his repast, And, that partaken, on the coolest side Of his abode, reclines, in sweet repose. Deep in the shaded stream the cattle stand, The flocks beside the fence, with heads all prone And panting quick. The fields for harvest ripe, No breezes bend in smooth and graceful waves, CARLOS WILCOX (17941827)17d"J 7 CARLOS WILCOX (October 23, 1794May 29, 1827) b. Newport, New Hampshire. Father, a farmer, moved to Orwell, Vermont, when Wilcox was four. Health frail from early age; childhood knee injury made him unsuited for farming. Studied at Middlebury College (where he was valedictorian in 1813) and at Andover Theological Seminary, from which he graduated in 1817. Preached in several Connecticut towns, and was ordained pastor of North Church in Hartford in 1824. Only volume of poetry published in his lifetime was The Age of Benevolence (1822), self-published book containing first book of projected five-book poem, of which three additional books remained in manuscript at Wilcoxs death. In 1824 read poem The Religion of Taste before Phi Beta Kappa Society of Yale. Left the pulpit in 1826 due to heart problems; resumed preaching in Danbury after several months of recuperation. The posthumous Remains (1828) contained sermons and extracts from later books of The Age of Benevolence, The Religion of Taste, and a biographical essay on Wilcox. rCARDmS=: $[ Index of Titles and First Liness94147{nrIrrrrrrr*0rFGrYrrr Ere, in the northern gale, Ere Sleep Comes Down to Soothe the Weary Eyes Ere sleep comes down to soothe the weary eyes, Ere yet they win that verge and line, Eride, V Eros Eskimo Songs Essential Oilsare wrung Estray, The Ethnogenesis (Europe the 72d and 73d Years of These States) Evangeline, from Evening Primrose, The Evening Star, The Ever at night have I looked up for thee, Every morn I lift my head, Evry Time I Feel the Spirit Evening Evening on the Potomac Everywhere, everywhere, following me; Evolution 49d283 2930 2930 1831 2968 541 3139 2327 2464 2173 1555 735 1155 729 1205 522 3223 2640 2828 2103 2635 in the northern gale, Ere Sleep Comes Down to Soothe the Weary Eyes Ere sleep comes down to soothe the weary eyes, Ere yet they win that verge and line, Eride, V Eros Eskimo Songs Essential Oilsare wrung Estray, The Ethnogenesis (Europe the 72d and 73d Years of These States) Evangeline, from Evening Primrose, The Evening Star, The Ever at night have I looked up for thee, Every morn I lift my head, Evry Time I Feel the Spirit Evening Evening on the Potomac Everywhere, everywhere, following me; Evolution 49d283 2930 2930 1831 2968 541 3139 2327 2464 2173 1555 735 1155 729 1205 522 3223 2640 2828 2103 2635CARD#*@ s93567[Biographical NotesBmqnpqquqv}q~qqqqq3}q~qqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqq qqq 'q(,q-/q07q8;q<CqD33333333rrrrr33333333rr$%-3.738jrqrryz33r3333333333333333 333%3&(3)/3AE3FN3OT3U]3^`3af3gn3or3su3vz3{}3complete training. In summer 1887 met Canadian poet Bliss Carman and artist Thomas Buford Meteyard, with whom he made walking tour of New England; in Scituate, Massachusetts, met Thomas William Parsons, poet and translator of Dante, whom he regarded as mentor. Corresponded intensively with novelist Amelie Rives, 188889. Gave lectures in philosophy, 188889, at Thomas Davidsons school in Farmington, Connecticut. In 1890 met Henriette Knapp Russell, wife of actor Edmund Russell and popular proponent of physical training system Delsartism (during stay in London, her friends included Oscar Wilde, James McNeill Whistler, and Madame Blavatsky); began affair with her. Under influence of Sidney Laniers The Science of English Verse, published essays on poetry and poetic technique in The Independent, 189194. Undertook mutli-part verse drama on Arthurian themes titled Poem in Dramas; first volume published as Launcelot and Guenevere (1891). Went to Europe with Mrs. Russell in 1891; traveled by himself in France, settling in Giverny. Joined Mrs. Russell in Tours; their son Julian born February 1892. Returned to U.S., leaving son in care of Bmqnpqquqv}q~qqqqq3}q~qqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqq qqq 'q(,q-/q07q8;q<CqD33333333rrrrr33333333rr$%-3.738jrqrryz33r3333333333333333 333%3&(3)/3AE3FN3OT3U]3^`3af3gn3or3su3vz3{}3complete training. In summer 1887 met Canadian poet Bliss Carman and artist Thomas Buford Meteyard, with whom he made walking tour of New England; in Scituate, Massachusetts, met Thomas William Parsons, poet and translator of Dante, whom he regarded as mentor. Corresponded intensively with novelist Amelie Rives, 188889. Gave lectures in philosophy, 188889, at Thomas Davidsons school in Farmington, Connecticut. In 1890 met Henriette Knapp Russell, wife of actor Edmund Russell and popular proponent of physical training system Delsartism (during stay in London, her friends included Oscar Wilde, James McNeill Whistler, and Madame Blavatsky); began affair with her. Under influence of Sidney Laniers The Science of English Verse, published essays on poetry and poetic technique in The Independent, 189194. Undertook mutli-part verse drama on Arthurian themes titled Poem in Dramas; first volume published as Launcelot and Guenevere (1891). Went to Europe with Mrs. Russell in 1891; traveled by himself in France, settling in Giverny. Joined Mrs. Russell in Tours; their son Julian born February 1892. Returned to U.S., leaving son in care of 46L ReturneCARD(@ hs93572[Biographical Notes3333 3!(3)233839>3?F3GO3PZ3[`3ai3jl3m3A~333333333333333GrY333333333333rr333rrr  33!3"'3(-3.536r78r>?rKLS3TrYZa3brcdrlmrxrrr&3'r*+r23r;<C3DrEFrLMrUV^rwrin collaboration with John James Piatt), published 1860. Wrote Lincoln campaign biography, using proceeds to travel East where he met literary figures including James Russell Lowell, James T. Fields, Oliver Wendell Homes, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Henry David Thoreau. Appointed U.S. consul in Venice (186164), where he studied Italian, Dante, and Venetian art. Married Elinor Mead in Paris in 1862; they had two daughters and a son. Resigning consulship, briefly joined staff of The Nation in New York before moving to Cambridge to serve as assistant editor of Atlantic Monthly. Formed close friendships with Mark Twain and William and Henry James. In 1871 succeeded James T. Fields as editor of Atlantic Monthly. Published first novel, Their Wedding Journey (1871), followed by, among other titles, A Chance Acquaintance (1873), Poems (1873), A Foregone Conclusion (1874), The Lady of the Aroostook (1879), and The Undiscovered Country (1880). Resigned Atlantic editorship in 1881 to write full time; moved to Boston. Later novels included Dr. Breens Practice (1881), A Modern Instance (1882), The Rise of Silas Lapham (1885), Indian Summer (1886), 3333 3!(3)233839>3?F3GO3PZ3[`3ai3jl3m3A~333333333333333GrY333333333333rr333rrr  33!3"'3(-3.536r78r>?rKLS3TrYZa3brcdrlmrxrrr&3'r*+r23r;<C3DrEFrLMrUV^rwrin collaboration with John James Piatt), published 1860. Wrote Lincoln campaign biography, using proceeds to travel East where he met literary figures including James Russell Lowell, James T. Fields, Oliver Wendell Homes, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Henry David Thoreau. Appointed U.S. consul in Venice (186164), where he studied Italian, Dante, and Venetian art. Married Elinor Mead in Paris in 1862; they had two daughters and a son. Resigning consulship, briefly joined staff of The Nation in New York before moving to Cambridge to serve as assistant editor of Atlantic Monthly. Formed close friendships with Mark Twain and William and Henry James. In 1871 succeeded James T. Fields as editor of Atlantic Monthly. Published first novel, Their Wedding Journey (1871), followed by, among other titles, A Chance Acquaintance (1873), Poems (1873), A Foregone Conclusion (1874), The Lady of the Aroostook (1879), and The Undiscovered Country (1880). Resigned Atlantic editorship in 1881 to write full time; moved to Boston. Later novels included Dr. Breens Practice (1881), A Modern Instance (1882), The Rise of Silas Lapham (1885), Indian Summer (1886), 46CARD0S@ 2s93579[Biographical Notesn333"3#*3+435qqqqqq32334:3;D3EL3M333rrr r3r!&r08rMUrfgn3or3srvwr{|r~r333rr333%3&)3*334637;3<>3?B3CG3HM3NX3Y`3ah3im3nq3r{3|rrrr3rrr333333 3 333title character was modeled on her father. Following death of James T. Fields in 1881, became close companion of Annie Fields, living with her for much of every year in Boston and Manchester-by-the-Sea, and traveling with her in Europe, Florida, and the Caribbean. On trips to Europe met Christina Rossetti, Alfred Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, George Du Maurier, Henry James, and Rudyard Kipling. Another novel, A Marsh Island (1885), was followed by the collections A White Heron (1886), The King of Folly Island and Other People (1888), Strangers and Wayfarers (1890), Tales of New England (1890), A Native of Winby (1893), and The Life of Nancy (1895) and popular history The Story of the Normans (1887). The Country of the Pointed Firs (1896), based on experiences in the Boothbay Harbor region of Maine, was acclaimed by many as her best book; additional stories dealing with the fictional town of Dunnet Landing were published in The Queens Twin and Other Stories (1899). The Tory Lover, a novel of the American Revolution, appeared in 1901. Received honorary degree in literature from Bowdoin in 1901, the first woman so honored. Thrown from a carriage in 1902; 46̘ o"CARD@d s9902[John Greenleaf WhittierVAnd, close at hand, the basket stood With nuts from brown Octobers wood. What matter how the night behaved? What matter how the north-wind raved? Blow high, blow low, not all its snow Could quench our hearth-fires ruddy glow. O Time and Change!with hair as gray As was my sires that winter day, How strange it seems, with so much gone Of life and love, to still live on! Ah, brother! only I and thou Are left of all that circle now, The dear home faces whereupon That fitful firelight paled and shone. Henceforward, listen as we will, The voices of that hearth are still; Look where we may, the wide earth oer, Those lighted faces smile no more. We tread the paths their feet have worn, We sit beneath their orchard-trees, 30 035wh5b.MOV 26560,6342626560 28286 29834 31472 33404 36136 38006 40400 42397 44519 46555 48130 49309 51179 52916 54459 56416 59104 60958 62621 63426m brown Octobers wood. What matter how the night behaved? What matter how the north-wind raved? Blow high, blow low, not all its snow Could quench our hearth-fires ruddy glow. O Time and Change!with hair as gray As was my sires that winter day, How strange it seems, with so much gone Of life and love, to still live on! Ah, brother! only I and thou Are left of all that circle now, The dear home faces whereupon That fitful firelight paled and shone. Henceforward, listen as we will, The voices of that hearth are still; Look where we may, the wide earth oer, Those lighted the wide earth oer, Those lighted CARD6@  s93584[Biographical Notesv3  3 33'3(435738r_i n3op u3v333333 33$3%/30:3;=3>L3MU3VX3Y^3_d3eh3ip3qv3w33333333333/03193:<3=A3BJ3KQ3RZq[aqbeqfkqlnqouqvxqyqqq333333-r33333333 3 3"*3+.3/637?3pleurisy in Baltimore. Poetry collected posthumously in Poems of the Late Francis S. Key, Esq. (1857). SIDNEY LANIER (February 3, 1842September 7, 1881) b. Macon, Georgia. Son of Mary Jane Anderson and Robert Sampson Lanier, a lawyer. As a child showed precocious musical ability. Graduated Oglethorpe University in Milledgeville, Georgia, in 1860; plans for further study interrupted by outbreak of war. Joined Macon Volunteers in July 1861; the following year fought in Seven Days Battle near Richmond, Virginia; served as mounted scout along James River, 186364. In 1864 captured aboard blockade runner (on which he served as signal officer) and imprisoned for four months at Point Lookout, Maryland. Health deteriorated in prison; contracted tuberculosis. Released February 1865; worked as hotel clerk in Montgomery, Alabama, then as teacher and law clerk in fathers office. In 1867 married Mary Day (with whom he had four sons) and published novel Tiger-Lilies, based on war experiences. Admitted to Georgia bar in 1869 and practiced for a time in fathers law office. Although n3  3 33'3(435738r_n3ou3v333333 33$3%/30:3;=3>L3MU3VX3Y^3_d3eh3ip3qv3w33333333333/03193:<3=A3BJ3KQ3RZq[aqbeqfkqlnqouqvxqyqqq333333-r33333333 3 3"*3+.3/637?3pleurisy in Baltimore. Poetry collected posthumously in Poems of the Late Francis S. Key, Esq. (1857). SIDNEY LANIER (February 3, 1842September 7, 1881) b. Macon, Georgia. Son of Mary Jane Anderson and Robert Sampson Lanier, a lawyer. As a child showed precocious musical ability. Graduated Oglethorpe University in Milledgeville, Georgia, in 1860; plans for further study interrupted by outbreak of war. Joined Macon Volunteers in July 1861; the following year fought in Seven Days Battle near Richmond, Virginia; served as mounted scout along James River, 186364. In 1864 captured aboard blockade runner (on which he served as signal officer) and imprisoned for four months at Point Lookout, Maryland. Health deteriorated in prison; contracted tuberculosis. Released February 1865; worked as hotel clerk in Montgomery, Alabama, then as teacher and law clerk in fathers office. In 1867 married Mary Day (with whom he had four sons) and published novel Tiger-Lilies, based on war experiences. Admitted to Georgia bar in 1869 and practiced for a time in fathers law office. Although 46s lawCARD:>@ Hs93588[Biographical Notesrqqq$q%-q.0q1p333"3#&3'-3.031839>3?F3GI3JN3OQ3RZ3[f3gl3mr3sx3y3333333333333333333!-3.53693:@3V\3]b3ci3jl3mq3ru3vy3z333333333rr333333333rrrr r33#3$(3),3-H L3MN U3V [\3]f3gj3ks3tw3x333333333333333 33Richard Reinhard) about 14th-century massacre of German Jews; dedicated Dance of Death to George Eliot, whose Daniel Deronda she credited with elevating and ennobling the spirit of Jewish nationality. Wrote sonnet The New Colossus in support of fund-raising campaign to build pedestal for Statue of Liberty (poem recited in 1886 at statues dedication; final lines later embossed on pedestal). Traveled to England and France in 1883; met Robert Browning and William Morris. Ill with cancer, made long visit to Europe, 188587; visited the Netherlands, France, and Italy; died less than three months after return to U.S. By the Waters of Babylon, sequence of prose poems, published in The Century in 1887. A posthumous two-volume edition of her works, The Poems of Emma Lazarus, edited by sisters Mary and Annie, appeared in 1889. JAMES MATHEWES LEGAR (November 26, 1823May 30, 1859) b. Charleston, South Carolina. Son of Mary Doughty Mathews and John D. Legar. Of Huguenot descent on fathers side; third cousin of South Carolina statesman fqqq$q%-q.0q1p333"3#&3'-3.031839>3?F3GI3JN3OQ3RZ3[f3gl3mr3sx3y3333333333333333333!-3.53693:@3V\3]b3ci3jl3mq3ru3vy3z333333333rr333333333rrrr r33#3$(3),3-L3MU3V\3]f3gj3ks3tw3x333333333333333 33Richard Reinhard) about 14th-century massacre of German Jews; dedicated Dance of Death to George Eliot, whose Daniel Deronda she credited with elevating and ennobling the spirit of Jewish nationality. Wrote sonnet The New Colossus in support of fund-raising campaign to build pedestal for Statue of Liberty (poem recited in 1886 at statues dedication; final lines later embossed on pedestal). Traveled to England and France in 1883; met Robert Browning and William Morris. Ill with cancer, made long visit to Europe, 188587; visited the Netherlands, France, and Italy; died less than three months after return to U.S. By the Waters of Babylon, sequence of prose poems, published in The Century in 1887. A posthumous two-volume edition of her works, The Poems of Emma Lazarus, edited by sisters Mary and Annie, appeared in 1889. JAMES MATHEWES LEGAR (November 26, 1823May 30, 1859) b. Charleston, South Carolina. Son of Mary Doughty Mathews and John D. Legar. Of Huguenot descent on fathers side; third cousin of South Carolina statesman 46olina C C CARDD@  ts93597[Biographical Notes^3rr3333333333$3%'3(/30:3;=3>3333r[3np3q~33r33)233@3AG3HL3MQ3RT3UX3Y\3]rrrrGraduated Harvard 1895. Continued studies in Romance languages at the Sorbonne in 189596, in company with close friend Trumbull Stickney. Began to publish poetry in Scribners, Harpers, and other magazines. Briefly returned to Europe in 1897 to study German and philosophy at the University of Berlin. Introduced to Buddhist practices and beliefs by family friend William Sturgis Bigelow. In 1897 went to work in Washington as fathers secretary. First book, The Song of the Wave, appeared in 1898; saw active service that year in Spanish- American War, participating in capture of Ponce, Puerto Rico. Became interested in Conservative Christian Anarchy, philosophical position developed with friends Henry Adams and Trumbull Stickney. Verse collected in Poems 18991902 (1902). In 1900 married Elizabeth (Matilda) Frelinghuysen Davis, with whom he had two sons and a daughter. In succeeding years published Cain, a Drama (1904), The Great Adventure (1905), Herakles (1908), and posthumously published The Souls Inheritance (1909) . Died following an attack of ptomaine poisoning. ^3rr3333333333$3%'3(/30:3;=3>3333r[3np3q~33r33)233@3AG3HL3MQ3RT3UX3Y\3]rrrrGraduated Harvard 1895. Continued studies in Romance languages at the Sorbonne in 189596, in company with close friend Trumbull Stickney. Began to publish poetry in Scribners, Harpers, and other magazines. Briefly returned to Europe in 1897 to study German and philosophy at the University of Berlin. Introduced to Buddhist practices and beliefs by family friend William Sturgis Bigelow. In 1897 went to work in Washington as fathers secretary. First book, The Song of the Wave, appeared in 1898; saw active service that year in Spanish- American War, participating in capture of Ponce, Puerto Rico. Became interested in Conservative Christian Anarchy, philosophical position developed with friends Henry Adams and Trumbull Stickney. Verse collected in Poems 18991902 (1902). In 1900 married Elizabeth (Matilda) Frelinghuysen Davis, with whom he had two sons and a daughter. In succeeding years published Cain, a Drama (1904), The Great Adventure (1905), Herakles (1908), and posthumously published The Souls Inheritance (1909) . Died following an attack of ptomaine poisoning. 46 ̘CARD @CARDM@2  s93605[Biographical Notesꁾr(3rXb f3gh l3mn s3ty3z|3}3333333333393CK3W[3\a3bh3i3333 3 ~3333333333Q3R\3]f3gm3nu3vx3y~33333rr33rin The English Poets, Lessing, Rousseau (1888) and Books and Libraries and Other Papers (1889). MARIA WHITE LOWELL (July 8, 1821October 27, 1853) b. Watertown, Massachusetts. Fourth of nine children of Anna Maria Howard and Abijah White; sister of William Abijah White, who became close friend of James Russell Lowell at Harvard; given name Anna Maria White. Although family was not Catholic, she was sent (as were the daughters of many prominent Protestant families) for primary education to the Ursuline Convent on Mt. Benedict in Charlestown, Massachusetts, where she was among the students forced to flee when the convent was burned by an anti-Catholic mob in August 1834. Later participated in Margaret Fullers conversations (pioneering experiment in womens education), 183944. During this period became dedicated to abolitionism and the temperance movement. Became engaged to James Russell Lowell in 1840. Published poetry in third and last number of Lowells magazine The Pioneer (1843); later contributed verse to The Childs Friend, Putnams Magazine, ށr(3rXf3gl3ms3ty3z|3}3333333333393CK3W[3\a3bh3i3333 3 ~3333333333Q3R\3]f3gm3nu3vx3y~33333rr33rin The English Poets, Lessing, Rousseau (1888) and Books and Libraries and Other Papers (1889). MARIA WHITE LOWELL (July 8, 1821October 27, 1853) b. Watertown, Massachusetts. Fourth of nine children of Anna Maria Howard and Abijah White; sister of William Abijah White, who became close friend of James Russell Lowell at Harvard; given name Anna Maria White. Although family was not Catholic, she was sent (as were the daughters of many prominent Protestant families) for primary education to the Ursuline Convent on Mt. Benedict in Charlestown, Massachusetts, where she was among the students forced to flee when the convent was burned by an anti-Catholic mob in August 1834. Later participated in Margaret Fullers conversations (pioneering experiment in womens education), 183944. During this period became dedicated to abolitionism and the temperance movement. Became engaged to James Russell Lowell in 1840. Published poetry in third and last number of Lowells magazine The Pioneer (1843); later contributed verse to The Childs Friend, Putnams Magazine, 46 FzineCARDD George Santayana Epes Sargent Clinton Scollard Edmund Hamilton Sears Lydia Huntley Sigourney Edward Rowland Sill William Gilmore Simms Edmund Clarence Stedman Trumbull Stickney William Wetmore Story John Banister Tabb Bayard Taylor Ernest Lawrence Thayer Henry David Thoreau Rose Hartwick Thorpe Henry Timrod John Townsend Trowbridge Frederick Goddard Tuckerman Mark Twain [Index of Poetss942433^2799 1205 2760 1103 208 2529 677 2401 2961 1266 2631 2099 2822 1234 2688 2169 2150 1976 2421 &Hrs Lydia Huntley Sigourney Edward Rowland Sill William Gilmore Simms Edmund Clarence Stedman Trumbull Stickney William Wetmore Story John Banister Tabb Bayard Taylor Ernest Lawrence Thayer Henry David Thoreau Rose Hartwick Thorpe Henry Timrod John Townsend Trowbridge Frederick Goddard Tuckerman Mark Twain 3% 1205 FREEFree Object y Timrod John Townsend Trowbridge Frederick Goddard Tuckerman Mark Twain 3% 1205 FREEFree Object ?Hj~$T9Ukon mousedown end mousedown on mouseup end mouseup *U- overheadY Blow Your Trumpet, Gabriel Buffalo Gals The Cowboys Lament Cripple Creek Cumberland Gap The Days of 49 Deep River Deres No Hidin Place Down Dere Didnt My Lord Deliver Daniel Down in the Valley Evry Time I Feel the Spirit Ezekiel Saw de Wheel Frankie and Albert Free at Last Got a Home in That Rock He Never Said a Mumblin Word U 3202 3203 3205 3208 3210 3212 3217 3218 3219 3221 3223 3223 3225 3232 3233 3235, 3FOLK SONGS AND SPIRITUALS  folks.bg*444876Folk Songs and SpiritualsfolkC?@S @@BMAP CARD]@  s93446[Biographical Notes2CrQgr}rrr3333333333333333 3!#3$b3cg3ho3ps3t}3333333333333:3;D3EM3NW3X^3_i3js3trz{r}~rrr3rrrrrr333r3 ,3-637:3;>3?D3EG3HLemuel Hopkins; with them collaborated on mock-heroic verse series The Anarchiad (published 178687 in The New Haven Gazette and The Connecticut Magazine). Columbus epic published in 1787 as The Vision of Columbus; advance subscribers to the edition included George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Paine, Alexander Hamilton, and the Marquis de Lafayette. In 1788 traveled to France as agent of the Ohio Company, selling Ohio River Valley real estate. In Paris, formed lifelong friendship with Thomas Jefferson, socialized with the Marquis de Lafayette, and witnessed scenes of French Revolution. By 1791, land venture had collapsed amid accusations of fraud and threats against Barlow. Resided in London, 179192; associates there included Thomas Paine, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, and Joseph Priestley. In 1792 published writings defending French Revolution including Advice to the Privileged Orders, A Letter to the National Convention of France, on the Defects in the Constitution of 1791, and verse satire The Conspiracy of Kings. Found enthusiastic reception for his ideas in France; in February 1793 made honorary French citizen; 2CrQgr}rrr3333333333333333 3!#3$b3cg3ho3ps3t}3333333333333:3;D3EM3NW3X^3_i3js3trz{r}~rrr3rrrrrr333r3 ,3-637:3;>3?D3EG3HLemuel Hopkins; with them collaborated on mock-heroic verse series The Anarchiad (published 178687 in The New Haven Gazette and The Connecticut Magazine). Columbus epic published in 1787 as The Vision of Columbus; advance subscribers to the edition included George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Paine, Alexander Hamilton, and the Marquis de Lafayette. In 1788 traveled to France as agent of the Ohio Company, selling Ohio River Valley real estate. In Paris, formed lifelong friendship with Thomas Jefferson, socialized with the Marquis de Lafayette, and witnessed scenes of French Revolution. By 1791, land venture had collapsed amid accusations of fraud and threats against Barlow. Resided in London, 179192; associates there included Thomas Paine, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, and Joseph Priestley. In 1792 published writings defending French Revolution including Advice to the Privileged Orders, A Letter to the National Convention of France, on the Defects in the Constitution of 1791, and verse satire The Conspiracy of Kings. Found enthusiastic reception for his ideas in France; in February 1793 made honorary French citizen; 46`BMAPS}T.CARDrg l6PVQVVVYVZVAs doth the lorn and mateless bird That constant mourns, whilst all unheard, The breezes freighted with the strains Of other songsters sweep the plain, That neer breathes forth a joyous note, Though odors on the zephyrs float The tribute of a thousand bowers, Rich in their store of fragrant flowers. Yet Ogs was a mind that joyed With nature in her every mood, Whether in sunshine unalloyed With darkness, or in tempest rude And, by the dashing waterfall, Or by the gently flowing river, Or listening to the thunders call, Hed joy away his life forever. But ah! life is a changeful thing, And pleasures swiftly pass away, And we may turn, with shuddering, From what we sighed for yesterday. The guest, at banquet-table spread [George Boyer Vashons6PVQVVVYVZVAs doth the lorn and mateless bird That constant mourns, whilst all unheard, The breezes freighted with the strains Of other songsters sweep the plain, That neer breathes forth a joyous note, Though odors on the zephyrs float The tribute of a thousand bowers, Rich in their store of fragrant flowers. Yet Ogs was a mind that joyed With nature in her every mood, Whether in sunshine unalloyed With darkness, or in tempest rude And, by the dashing waterfall, Or by the gently flowing river, Or listening to the thunders call, Hed joy away his life forever. But ah! life is a changeful thing, And pleasures swiftly pass away, And we may turn, with shuddering, From what we sighed for yesterday. The guest, at banquet-table spread 1992051 sCARDs9g L .8V9VVVVWith choicest viands, shakes with dread, Nor heeds the goblet bright and fair, Nor tastes the dainties rich and rare, Nor bids his eye with pleasure trace The wreathed flowers that deck the place, If he but knows there is a draught Among the cordials, that, if quaffed, Will send swift poison through his veins. So Og seems; nor does his eye With pleasure view the flowery plains, The bounding sea, the spangled sky, As, in the short and soft twilight, The stars peep brightly forth in heaven, And hasten to the realms of night, As handmaids of the Even. * * * * * * * * The loud shouts from the distant town, Joined in with natures gladsome lay; The lights went glancing up and down, [George Boyer Vashons .8V9VVVVWith choicest viands, shakes with dread, Nor heeds the goblet bright and fair, Nor tastes the dainties rich and rare, Nor bids his eye with pleasure trace The wreathed flowers that deck the place, If he but knows there is a draught Among the cordials, that, if quaffed, Will send swift poison through his veins. So Og seems; nor does his eye With pleasure view the flowery plains, The bounding sea, the spangled sky, As, in the short and soft twilight, The stars peep brightly forth in heaven, And hasten to the realms of night, As handmaids of the Even. * * * * * * * * The loud shouts from the distant town, Joined in with natures gladsome lay; The lights went glancing up and down, 1992052 4HXPAGE y&[' ,0`(*z02v -'hqqoQ紩 UA#J$|(B^,L 2bL+LsT݄0 ٦ JAlbap$AB0&YʈH 5* #HhI 2 uqx(wMa^f=*bRM"96c~<"d #f!Lo&K!O)mBʏa/Ae QLxiʸA|u&H $phjH*fj&9Ayj!@Bm9LC"iS ND&>*$qXUI$* Jh-%aT ΃$@UءbXuiB@^@ Q /kJh"c%p({͸B rMį1΀:,Kt yO@ Kyy]GAGUٍ}|BlbA^D2D 6p(S ! 0 MP80H2 H: J012rD@A{9(&qDWQH5N ԏJE%a .H@AJCH:lUH$XfĄe`U B5:@LXHҎ F%ʎ" S2]¿Pd@l&e5GD$ hqp%"/SGEhf|n\xp#ā 43  lx `J54l‡EH=@D.G $I6d1raXBJ葅 լmGJ"+@@ @D Ap4P  T0> `Q  4Yh@P! Ö[$9}(AB eS ˨bZBiAa6oE@ap ( 2E7hZKlDh`F@ lGDbPEF!`(i(4K1ŕgȇF MI/D ?`SH 85zA%yQ, 4 ;q`FK94DlF+@(c`BQy '@6U1 `SI<YYR@<@P43ȆUUX@d@ 0D; "P adbQ 4g68P&4$I\fzGu^4 V$= ZaR2 L\7QrFUO࡬J@KAR@!Pe!`4 UH >  a083@eHOB;&@0@8PI 'e;iHECeDT. suBU&)L9D`)0P!(  Ƃ $CARDX@K s9530[Ralph Waldo EmersonLaw for man, and law for thing; The last builds town and fleet, But it runs wild, And doth the man unking. Tis fit the forest fall, The steep be graded, The mountain tunnelled, The sand shaded, The orchard planted, The glebe tilled, The prairie granted, The steamer built. Let man serve law for man; Live for friendship, live for love, For truths and harmonys behoof; The state may follow how it can, As Olympus follows Jove. 29r thing; The last builds town and fleet, But it runs wild, And doth the man unking. Tis fit the forest fall, The steep be graded, The mountain tunnelled, The sand shaded, The orchard planted, The glebe tilled, The prairie granted, The steamer built. Let man serve law for man; Live for friendship, live for love, For truths and harmonys behoof; The state may follow how it can, As Olympus follows Jove. 29`CARD#@) s99[Philip Freneauz:3r>arrr`Var To make the purpose all complete, Before they bid two oceans meet; Before the task is finished, all, What rocks must yield, what forests fall? Three years elapsed, behold it done! A work from Natures chaos won; By hearts of oak and hands of toil The Spade inverts the rugged soil A work, that may remain secure While suns exist and Moons endure. With patient step I see them move Oer many a plain, through many a grove; Herculean strength disdains the sod Where tigers ranged or Mohawks trod; The powers that can the soil subdue Will see the mighty project through. 1t3r>arrr`Var To make the purpose all complete, Before they bid two oceans meet; Before the task is finished, all, What rocks must yield, what forests fall? Three years elapsed, behold it done! A work from Natures chaos won; By hearts of oak and hands of toil The Spade inverts the rugged soil A work, that may remain secure While suns exist and Moons endure. With patient step I see them move Oer many a plain, through many a grove; Herculean strength disdains the sod Where tigers ranged or Mohawks trod; The powers that can the soil subdue Will see the mighty project through. tCARD$@) s910[Philip Freneau~BV$r)0r9dVerr r&r3 Ye patrons of this bold design Who Erie to the Atlantic join, To you be every honour paid No time shall see your fame decayed: Through gloomy groves you traced the plan, The rude abodes of savage man. Ye Prompters of a work so vast That may for years, for centuries last; Where Nature toiled to bar the way You markd her steps, but changed her sway. Ye Artists, who, with skillful hand, Conduct such rivers through the land, Proceed!and in your bold carreer May every Plan as wise appear, As this, which joins to Hudsons wave What Nature to St. Lawrence gave. 1 CLUdVerr r&r3 Ye patrons of this bold design Who Erie to the Atlantic join, To you be every honour paid No time shall see your fame decayed: Through gloomy groves you traced the plan, The rude abodes of savage man. Ye Prompters of a work so vast That may for years, for centuries last; Where Nature toiled to bar the way You markd her steps, but changed her sway. Ye Artists, who, with skillful hand, Conduct such rivers through the land, Proceed!and in your bold carreer May every Plan as wise appear, As this, which joins to Hudsons wave What Nature to St. Lawrence gave. CLUCARD4@* s927[ Joel BarlowހVWhere hoary winter holds his howling reign And April flings her timid showers in vain, Groans the choked Flood, in frozen fetters bound, And isles of ice his angry front surround. As old Enceladus, in durance vile, Spreads his huge length beneath Sicilias isle, Feels mountains, crusht by mountains, on him prest, Close not his veins nor still his laboring breast; His limbs convulse, his heart rebellious rolls, Earth shakes responsive to her utmost poles, While rumbling, bursting, boils his ceaseless ire, Flames to mid heaven and sets the skies on fire. So the contristed Laurence lays him low, And hills of sleet and continents of snow Rise on his crystal breast; his heaving sides Crash with the weight, and pour their gushing tides. Asouth, whence all his hundred branches bend, Relenting airs with boreal blasts contend; Far in his vast extremes he swells and thaws, And seas foam wide between his ice-bound jaws. Indignant Frost, to hold his captive, plies Enceladuschar 189 to 197 of bkgnd field id 1CardEnceladuschar 380 to 388 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 933994 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false2VWhere hoary winter holds his howling reign And April flings her timid showers in vain, Groans the choked Flood, in frozen fetters bound, And isles of ice his angry front surround. As old Enceladus, in durance vile, Spreads his huge length beneath Sicilias isle, Feels mountains, crusht by mountains, on him prest, Close not his veins nor still his laboring breast; His limbs convulse, his heart rebellious rolls, Earth shakes responsive to her utmost poles, While rumbling, bursting, boils his ceaseless ire, Flames to mid heaven and sets the skies on fire. So the contristed Laurence lays him low, And hills of sleet and continents of snow Rise on his crystal breast; his heaving sides Crash with the weight, and pour their gushing tides. Asouth, whence all his hundred branches bend, Relenting airs with boreal blasts contend; Far in his vast extremes he swells and thaws, And seas foam wide between his ice-bound jaws. Indignant Frost, to hold his captive, plies  CARDT @, s956[John Quincy AdamsWV $V%gVhVV V[V\VV IV. And then I want a mansion fair, A dwelling house, in style, Four stories high, for wholesome air A massive marble pile; With halls for banquets and balls, All furnished rich and fine; With stabled studs in fifty stalls, And cellars for my wine. V. I want a garden and a park, My dwelling to surround A thousand acres (bless the mark), With walls encompassed round Where flocks may range and herds may low, And kids and lambkins play, And flowers and fruits commingled grow, All Eden to display. 4lay. VVV[V\VVIV. And then I want a mansion fair, A dwelling house, in style, Four stories high, for wholesome air A massive marble pile; With halls for banquets and balls, All furnished rich and fine; With stabled studs in fifty stalls, And cellars for my wine. V. I want a garden and a park, My dwelling to surround A thousand acres (bless the mark), With walls encompassed round Where flocks may range and herds may low, And kids and lambkins play, And flowers and fruits commingled grow, All Eden to display. lay. CARDN@+O s943[ Joel BarlowӀ> 0 35 <I OQ ThViszEQUALITY, your first firm-grounded stand; Then FREE ELECTION; then your FEDERAL BAND; This holy Triad should for ever shine The great compendium of all rights divine, Creed of all schools, whence youths by millions draw Their themes of right, their decalogues of law; Till men shall wonder (in these codes inured) How wars were made, how tyrants were endured. Then shall your works of art superior rise, Your fruits perfume a larger length of skies, Canals careering climb your sunbright hills, Vein the green slopes and strow their nurturing rills, Thro tunneld heights and sundering ridges glide, Rob the rich west of half Kenhawas tide, Mix your wide climates, all their stores confound And plant new ports in every midland mound. Your lawless Missisippi, now who slimes And drowns and desolates his waste of climes, Ribbd with your dikes, his torrent shall restrain And ask your leave to travel to the main; Kenhawachar 628 to 634 of bkgnd field id 1CardKenhawachar 691 to 697 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 934338 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false2your leave to travel to the main; st firm-grounded stand; Then FREE ELECTION; then your FEDERAL BAND; This holy Triad should for ever shine The great compendium of all rights divine, Creed of all schools, whence youths by millions draw Their themes of right, their decalogues of law; Till men shall wonder (in these codes inured) How wars were made, how tyrants were endured. Then shall your works of art superior rise, Your fruits perfume a larger length of skies, Canals careering climb your sunbright hills, Vein the green slopes and strow their nurturing rills, Thro tunneld heights and sundering ridges glide, Rob the rich west of half Kenhawas tide, Mix your wide climates, all their stores confound And plant new ports in every midland mound. Your lawless Missisippi, now who slimes And drowns and desolates his waste of climes, Ribbd with your dikes, his torrent shall restrain And ask your leave to travel to the main; your leave to travel to the main; CARD   > The Sisters The waves forever move; The hills forever rest: Yet each the heavens approve, And Love alike hath blessed A Marthas household care, A Marys cloistered prayer.[John Banister Tabbs r The Sisters The waves forever move; The hills forever rest: Yet each the heavens approve, And Love alike hath blessed A Marthas household care, A Marys cloistered prayer.1092639p`P@CARDu@f @s93640[Biographical Notes3 3 3.233r33333Q3RT3U[3xy3z}3~r33333333333 3 3!#3$*3+03133493:?3@B3CI3mrrsrxy33333333333333 333&3'*3+233637<3=D3EK3LO3PX3Y]3^c3df3gn3op3qy3z|3}333333333333333 3333#3$+3,/3093:E3FH3IO3Paris upon release and continued to dodge his many creditors. Wrote the lyrics of Home, Sweet Home (with music by Henry Bishop) for inclusion in his play Clari; or, the Maid of Milan (1823); the song achieved immediate widespread popularity, but Payne realized little monetary gain from it. Washington Irving spent much time with Payne in Paris, frequently lending him money, and collaborating on a number of plays, including Charles the Second (1824) and Richelieu (1826). Met Mary Shelley around 1823 and courted her unsuccessfully. Settled in London again in 1826, where he edited and published theatrical newspaper Opera Glass (182627). Nearly penniless despite prolific output, returned to America in 1832, traveling at expense of friends. A benefit performance of his work, featuring Edwin Forrest and Charles and Fanny Kemble, earned him $10,000. Made plans to publish a magazine of the arts which never appeared, although Payne traveled throughout South securing subscriptions and materials for articles. In 1835 met John Ross, head of the Cherokee Nation, and requested information on tribal history for proposed 3 3 3.233r33333Q3RT3U[3xy3z}3~r33333333333 3 3!#3$*3+03133493:?3@B3CI3mrrsrxy33333333333333 333&3'*3+233637<3=D3EK3LO3PX3Y]3^c3df3gn3op3qy3z|3}333333333333333 3333#3$+3,/3093:E3FH3IO3Paris upon release and continued to dodge his many creditors. Wrote the lyrics of Home, Sweet Home (with music by Henry Bishop) for inclusion in his play Clari; or, the Maid of Milan (1823); the song achieved immediate widespread popularity, but Payne realized little monetary gain from it. Washington Irving spent much time with Payne in Paris, frequently lending him money, and collaborating on a number of plays, including Charles the Second (1824) and Richelieu (1826). Met Mary Shelley around 1823 and courted her unsuccessfully. Settled in London again in 1826, where he edited and published theatrical newspaper Opera Glass (182627). Nearly penniless despite prolific output, returned to America in 1832, traveling at expense of friends. A benefit performance of his work, featuring Edwin Forrest and Charles and Fanny Kemble, earned him $10,000. Made plans to publish a magazine of the arts which never appeared, although Payne traveled throughout South securing subscriptions and materials for articles. In 1835 met John Ross, head of the Cherokee Nation, and requested information on tribal history for proposed 46ete Card CARDh, ^#miraculous birth, who was sent among them to clear their rivers, forests, and fishing-grounds, and to teach them the arts of peace . . . Into this old tradition I have woven other curious Indian legends, drawn chiefly from the various and valuable writings of Mr. Schoolcraft, to whom the literary world is greatly indebted for his indefatigable zeal in rescuing from oblivion so much of the legendary lore of the Indians. The scene of the poem is among the Ojibways on the southern shore of Lake Superior, in the region between the Pictured Rocks and the Grand Sable.from Longfellows note. For the life and work of Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, see biographical note, p. 3789. 748.1 Medas] Medicine-men.Longfellows note. 748.2 Wabenos] Magicians.Longfellows note. 749.19 Gitche Manito] The Great Spirit, the Master of Life.Longfellows note. [ Line Notess93897Medaschar 676 to 680 of bkgnd field id 1CardMedaschar 23 to 27 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 207404 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseWabenoschar 729 to 735 of bkgnd field id 1CardWabenoschar 51 to 57 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 207404 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseGitche Manitochar 782 to 794 of bkgnd field id 1CardGitche Manitochar 580 to 592 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 207655 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false40#miraculous birth, who was sent among them to clear their rivers, forests, and fishing-grounds, and to teach them the arts of peace . . . Into this old tradition I have woven other curious Indian legends, drawn chiefly from the various and valuable writings of Mr. Schoolcraft, to whom the literary world is greatly indebted for his indefatigable zeal in rescuing from oblivion so much of the legendary lore of the Indians. The scene of the poem is among the Ojibways on the southern shore of Lake Superior, in the region between the Pictured Rocks and the Grand Sable.from Longfellows note. For the life and work of Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, see biographical note, p. 3789. 748.1 Medas] Medicine-men.Longfellows note. 748.2 Wabenos] Magicians.Longfellows note. 749.19 Gitche Manito] The Great Spirit, the Master of Life.Longfellows note. 40CARD!@) s97[Philip FreneauFr rTr]rrrr!rFrom Eries shores to Hudsons stream The unrivalled work would endless seem; Would millions for the work demand, And half depopulate the land. To Fancys view, what years must run, What ages, till the task is done! Even truth, severe would seem to say, One hundred years must pass away: The sons might see what sires began, Still unperformed the mighty plan, The impeded barque, in durance held, By hills confined, by rocks repelled. Not Chinas wall, though grand and strong, Five hundred leagues it towers along, Not Chinas wall, though stretching far, Which this vast object can compare, 1 nrrrr!rFrom Eries shores to Hudsons stream The unrivalled work would endless seem; Would millions for the work demand, And half depopulate the land. To Fancys view, what years must run, What ages, till the task is done! Even truth, severe would seem to say, One hundred years must pass away: The sons might see what sires began, Still unperformed the mighty plan, The impeded barque, in durance held, By hills confined, by rocks repelled. Not Chinas wall, though grand and strong, Five hundred leagues it towers along, Not Chinas wall, though stretching far, Which this vast object can compare, nCARD"k@) s98[Philip Freneau6+r1brVr%r*frkWith such gigantic works of old This proud Canal may be enrolled, Which to our use no tyrant gave Nor owes its grandeur to one Slave. If kings their object tribes compelld With toil immense, such walls to build, A new Republic in the west (A great example to the rest) Can seas unite, and here will shew What Freedoms nervous sons can do. See Commerce here expand her sail, And distant shores those waters hail, As wafting to Manhattans coast The products that new regions boast. And hence our fleets transport their freights To jealous kings and sister states, And spread her fame from shore to shore, Where suns ascend, or billows roar, 1` r%r*frkWith such gigantic works of old This proud Canal may be enrolled, Which to our use no tyrant gave Nor owes its grandeur to one Slave. If kings their object tribes compelld With toil immense, such walls to build, A new Republic in the west (A great example to the rest) Can seas unite, and here will shew What Freedoms nervous sons can do. See Commerce here expand her sail, And distant shores those waters hail, As wafting to Manhattans coast The products that new regions boast. And hence our fleets transport their freights To jealous kings and sister states, And spread her fame from shore to shore, Where sunr states, And spread her fame from shore to shore, Where sunCARD.@) Hs920[Philip Freneau6rAMade Hampton Court to fire a prey, And meanly, then, to sneak away, And never ask them, whats to pay? Would that be conquering London town? Would that subvert the english throne, Or bring the royal system down? With all their glare of guards or guns, How would they look like simpletons, And not at all the lions sons! Supposing, then, we take our turn And make it public law, to burn, Would not old english honor spurn At such a mean insidious plan Which only suits some savage clan And surely notthe english man! 16rAMade Hampton Court to fire a prey, And meanly, then, to sneak away, And never ask them, whats to pay? Would that be conquering London town? Would that subvert the english throne, Or bring the royal system down? With all their glare of guards or guns, How would they look like simpletons, And not at all the lions sons! Supposing, then, we take our turn And make it public law, to burn, Would not old english honor spurn At such a mean insidious plan Which only suits some savage clan And surely notthe english man! 1CARD1@* @s925[ Joel Barlowrqqqqqqq9V3q49q:CqDIqJPqQTo future sails unfold an inland way And guard secure thy multifluvian bay; That drains uncounted realms, and here unites The liquid mass from Alleganian heights. York leads his wave, imbankd in flowery pride, And nobler James falls winding by his side; Back to the hills, thro many a silent vale, Wild Rappahanoc seems to lure the sail, Patapscos bosom courts the hand of toil, Dull Susquehanna laves a length of soil; But mightier far, in sealike azure spread, Potomac sweeps his earth disparting bed. Long dwelt his eye where these commingling pourd, Their waves unkeeld, their havens unexplored; Where frowning forests stretch the dusky wing, And deadly damps forbid the flowers to spring; No seasons clothe the field with cultured grain, No buoyant ship attempts the chartless main; Then, with impatient voice, My Seer, he cried, When shall my children cross the lonely tide? Here, here my sons, the hand of culture bring, 2CARD@@* 4s934[ Joel Barlow Fqqqqqqq V And suns and stars repeat their dancing fires. Wide oer his meadowy lawns he spreads and feeds His realms of canes, his waving world of reeds; Where mammoths grazed the renovating groves, Slaked their huge thirst and chilld their fruitless loves; Where elks, rejoicing oer the extinguisht race, By myriads rise to fill the vacant space. Earths widest gulf expands to meet his wave, Vast isles of ocean in his current lave; Glad Thetis greets him from his finisht course And bathes her Nereids in his freshening source. To his broad bed their tributary stores Wisconsin here, there lonely Peter pours; Croix, from the northeast wilds, his channel fills, Ohio, gatherd from his myriad hills, Yazoo and Black, surcharged by Georgian springs, Rich Illinois his copious treasure brings; Arkansa, measuring back the suns long course, Moine, Francis, Rouge augment the fathers force. But chief of all his family of floods Missouri marches thro his world of woods; 2qq@CARD@2I s9145[Richard Henry Danag> A Touching with glory all the show. A breeze!Up helm!Away! XVI. Careening to the wind, they reach, With laugh and call, the shore. Theyve left their foot-prints on the beach. And shall I see them more? XVII. Goddess of Beauty, must I now Vowd worship to thee pay? Dear goddess, I grow old, I trow: My head is growing gray. WTouching with glory all the show. A breeze!Up helm!Away! XVI. Careening to the wind, they reach, With laugh and call, the shore. Theyve left their foot-prints on the beach. And shall I see them more? XVII. Goddess of Beauty, must I now Vowd worship to thee pay? Dear goddess, I grow old, I trow: My head is growing gray. 11 CARD7@* bs929[ Joel Barlow:WVXVuqv{q|qqqqqqqqqqqqThe torn foundations on the surface ride, And wrecks of winter load the downward tide. The loosend ice-isles oer the main advance, Toss on the surge and thro the concave dance; Whirld high, conjoind, in crystal mountains driven, Alp over Alp, they build a midway heaven; Whose million mirrors mock the solar ray And give condensed the tenfold glare of day. As towrd the south the mass enormous glides And brineless rivers furrow down its sides, The thirsty sailor steals a glad supply, And sultry tradewinds quaff the boreal sky. But oft insidious death, with mist oerstrown, Rides the dark ocean on this icy throne; When ships thro vernal seas with light airs steer Their midnight march and deem no danger near. The steerman gaily helms his course along And laughs and listens to the watchmans song, Who walks the deck, enjoys the murky fog, Sure of his chart, his magnet and his log; Their shipmates dreaming, while their slumbers last, 2CARD>c@[ s9767[Henry Wadsworth LongfellowYNV gVhVVVcVdVA whisper, and then a silence: Yet I know by their merry eyes They are plotting and planning together To take me by surprise. A sudden rush from the stairway, A sudden raid from the hall! By three doors left unguarded They enter my castle wall! They climb up into my turret Oer the arms and back of my chair; If I try to escape, they surround me; They seem to be everywhere. They almost devour me with kisses, Their arms about me entwine, Till I think of the Bishop of Bingen In his Mouse-Tower on the Rhine! Bishop of Bingenchar 471 to 486 of bkgnd field id 1CardBishopchar 642 to 647 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 944573 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseIn his Mouse-Tower on the Rhine!char 489 to 520 of bkgnd field id 1Card . . . Rhine!char 648 to 660 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 944573 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseBishop of Bingen In his Mouse-Tower on the Rhine!char 471 to 520 of bkgnd field id 1CardBishop . . . Rhine!char 642 to 660 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 944573 of stack "really real"false34gVhVVVcVdVVA whisper, and then a silence: Yet I know by their merry eyes They are plotting and planning together To take me by surprise. A sudden rush from the stairway, A sudden raid from the hall! By three doors left unguarded They enter my castle wall! They climb up into my turret Oer the arms and back of my chair; If I try to escape, they surround me; They seem to be everywhere. They almost devour me with kisses, Their arms about me entwine, TiCARDIh@+O s945[ Joel BarlowVqV}r From Mohawks mouth, far westing with the sun, Thro all the midlands recent channels run, Tap the redundant lakes, the broad hills brave, And Hudson marry with Missouris wave. From dim Superior, whose uncounted sails Shade his full seas and bosom all his gales, New paths unfolding seek Mackensies tide, And towns and empires rise along their side; Slaves crystal highways all his north adorn, Like coruscations from the boreal morn. Proud Missisippi, tamed and taught his road, Flings forth irriguous from his generous flood Ten thousand watery glades; that, round him curld, Vein the broad bosom of the western world. Book X, lines 213226 2 m Mohawks mouth, far westing with the sun, Thro all the midlands recent channels run, Tap the redundant lakes, the broad hills brave, And Hudson marry with Missouris wave. From dim Superior, whose uncounted sails Shade his full seas and bosom all his gales, New paths unfolding seek Mackensies tide, And towns and empires rise along their side; Slaves crystal highways all his north adorn, Like coruscations from the boreal morn. Proud Missisippi, tamed and taught his road, Flings forth irriguous from his generous flood Ten thousand watery glades; that, round him curld, Vein the broad bosom of the western world. Book X, lines 213226  CARD>@* ,s933[ Joel BarlowzV{And calls from western heavens, to feed his stream, The rains and floods that Asian seas might claim. Strong in his march and charged with all the fates Of regions pregnant with a hundred states, He holds in balance, ranged on either hand, Two distant oceans and their sundering land, Commands and drains the interior tracts that lie Outmeasuring Europes total breadth of sky. High in the north his parent fountains wed, And oozing urns adorn his infant head; In vain proud Frost his nursing lakes would close And choke his channel with perennial snows; From all their slopes he curves his countless rills, Sweeps their long marshes, saps their settling hills; Then stretching, straitening south, he gaily gleams, Swells thro the climes and swallows all their streams; From zone to zone, oer earths broad surface curld, He cleaves his course, he furrows half the world, Now roaring wild thro bursting mountains driven, Now calm reflecting all the host of heaven; Where Cynthia pausing, her own face admires, 2$8scalls frCARDO@+O ps944[ Joel BarlowG"]VhrVVrWon from his wave while rising cantons smile, Rear their glad nations and reward their toil. Book VIII, lines 384420 But now had Hesper from the Heros sight Veild the vast world with sudden shades of night. Earth, sea and heaven, whereer he turns his eye, Arch out immense, like one surrounding sky Lampt with reverberant fires. The starry train Paint their fresh forms beneath the placid main; Fair Cynthia here her face reflected laves, Bright Venus gilds again her natal waves, The Bear redoubling foams with fiery joles, And two dire Dragons twine two arctic poles. Lights oer the land, from cities lost in shade, New constellations, new galaxies spread, And each high pharos double flames provides, One from its fires, one fainter from the tides. Book IX, lines 114 2hrVVrWon from his wave while rising cantons smile, Rear their glad nations and reward their toil. Book VIII, lines 384420 But now had Hesper from the Heros sight Veild the vast world with sudden shades of night. Earth, sea and heaven, whereer he turns his eye, Arch out immense, like one surrounding sky Lampt with reverberant fires. The starry train Paint their fresh forms beneath the placid main; Fair Cynthia here her face reflected laves, Bright Venus gilds again her natal waves, The Bear redoubling foams with fiery joles, And two dire Dragons twine two arctic poles. Lights oer the land, from cities lost in shade, New constellations, new galaxies spread, And each high pharos double flames provides, One from its fires, one fainter from the tides. Book IX, lines 114 CARDF(@+O Zs938[ Joel Barlow2YqZcqdiqjmqnwqx}q~V V SqTYqZ_q`fqgiqjoqpsqtzq{Ananas stalk its shaggy honors yields, Acacias flowers perfume a thousand fields, Their clusterd dates the mast-like palms unfold, The spreading orange waves a load of gold, Connubial vines oertop the larch they climb, The long-lived olive mocks the moth of time, Pomonas pride, that old Grenada claims, Here smiles and reddens in diviner flames; Pimento, citron scent the sky serene, White woolly clusters fringe the cottons green, The sturdy fig, the frail deciduous cane And foodful cocoa fan the sultry plain. Here, in one view, the same glad branches bring The fruits of autumn and the flowers of spring; No wintry blasts the unchanging year deform, Nor beasts unshelterd fear the pinching storm; But vernal breezes oer the blossoms rove And breathe the ripend juices thro the grove. Beneath the crystal waves inconstant light, Pearls burst their shells to greet the Heros sight; From opening earth in living lustre shine 2 CARD@/y s9108[Washington Allstonπ>fV6V8RVSnVpVVVV VV6V8WVXvVxVVV&V)America to Great Britain All hail! thou noble Land, Our Fathers native soil! O stretch thy mighty hand, Gigantic grown by toil, Oer the vast Atlantic wave to our shore: For thou with magic might Canst reach to where the light Of Phbus travels bright The world oer! The Genius of our clime, From his pine-embattled steep, Shall hail the guest sublime; While the Tritons of the deep With their conchs the kindred league shall proclaim. Then let the world combine Oer the main our Naval Line Like the milky way shall shine Bright in fame! 8 VSnVpVVVV VV6V8WVXvVxVVV&V)America to Great Britain All hail! thou noble Land, Our Fathers native soil! O stretch thy mighty hand, Gigantic grown by toil, Oer the vast Atlantic wave to our shore: For thou with magic might Canst reach to where the light Of Phbus travels bright The world oer! The Genius of our clime, From his pine-embattled steep, Shall hail the guest sublime; While the Tritons of the deep With their conchs the kindred league shall proclaim. Then let the world combine Oer the main our Naval Line Like the milky way shall shine Bright in fame! 8 CARDN@7! s9223[ John NealkVwrThey come, the Star-troops! while the Eagle-breed Flap loudly oer each helm, and oer each foaming steed. Canto IV, lines 140 16kVwrThey come, the Star-troops! while the Eagle-breed Flap loudly oer each helm, and oer each foaming steed. Canto IV, lines 140 16 @CARDH8*,  F6@q#8Wk5F120.5 Peneus] A river in Thessaly, Greece. 120.9 Citheron] A mountain in east central Greece. 120.13 Hmus . . . Hebrus] Latin names for the Balkan Mountains and for the river Maritsa, which originates in Bulgaria to form part of the border between Greece and Turkey. 121.9 lamentable . . . vale] Cf. Matthew 2:18. 122.2 tear . . . daughters] Cf. Psalm 137. 122.10 Vallombrosa] A village in Tuscany, situated in the Apennines. 122.13 Mont Alto] Montalto is the highest peak in the Aspromonte ridge of the South Apennines. 130.2 my hiding-place] Cf. Psalm 32:7. [ Line Notess93866FHmus . . . Hebruschar 114 to 131 of bkgnd field id 1CardHmus, Thracian Hebruschar 550 to 571 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 38279 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falsePeneuschar 9 to 14 of bkgnd field id 1CardPeneuschar 204 to 209 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 38279 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false Citheronchar 55 to 64 of bkgnd field id 1CardCitheronchar 378 to 385 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 38279 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falselamentablechar 292 to 301 of bkgnd field id 1Cardlamentable wailchar 364 to 378 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 38647 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false . . . valechar 302 to 312 of bkgnd field id 1CardThat piercd the shades of Ramas palmy valechar 381 to 424 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 38647 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falsetear . . . daughterschar 344 to 363 of bkgnd field id 1Cardtear of Judahs captive daughterschar 52 to 84 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 38679 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseVallombrosachar 393 to 403 of bkgnd field id 1CardVallombrosachar 415 to 425 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 38679 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseMont Altochar 467 to 475 of bkgnd field id 1CardMont Altochar 537 to 545 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 38679 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falsemy hiding-placechar 566 to 582 of bkgnd field id 1Cardmy hiding-place.char 53 to 70 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 41117 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falselamentable . . . valechar 292 to 312 of bkgnd field id 1Cardlamentable wail, That piercd the shades of Ramas palmy valechar 364 to 424 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 38647 of stack "really real"false40nn8Wk5F120.5 Peneus] A river in Thessaly, Greece. 120.9 Citheron] A mountain in east central Greece. 120.13 Hmus . . . Hebrus] Latin names for the Balkan Mountains and for the river Maritsa, which originates in Bulgaria to form part of the border between Greece and Turkey. 121.9 lamentable . . . vale] Cf. Matthew 2:18. 122.2 tear . . . daughters] Cf. Psalm 137. 122.10 Vallombrosa] A village in Tuscany, sit CARDW@, s959[John Quincy AdamsRZ  %V&bVcVV VYVZVVX. And maples, of fair glossy stain, Must form my chamber doors, And carpets of the Wilton grain Must cover all my floors; My walls, with tapestry bedeckd, Must never be outdone; And damask curtains must protect Their colors from the sun. XI. And mirrors of the largest pane From Venice must be brought; And sandal-wood, and bamboo cane, For chairs and tables bought; On all the mantel-pieces, clocks Of thrice-gilt bronze must stand, And screens of ebony and box Invite the strangers hand. 4VYVZVVX. And maples, of fair glossy stain, Must form my chamber doors, And carpets of the Wilton grain Must cover all my floors; My walls, with tapestry bedeckd, Must never be outdone; And damask curtains must protect Their colors from the sun. XI. And mirrors of the largest pane From Venice must be brought; And sandal-wood, and bamboo cane, For chairs and tables bought; On all the mantel-pieces, clocks Of thrice-gilt bronze must stand, And screens of ebony and box Invite the strangers hand. @CARDO@- `s969[John Quincy AdamsV$V%ZV[VVV`VaVV$V%He mounts the summit of Mont Blanc, Or Popocatapetl. On Chimborazos breathless height, He treads oer burning lava; Or snuffs the Bohan Upas blight, The deathful plant of Java. Through every peril he shall pass, By Virtues shield protected; And still by Truths unerring glass His path shall be directed. Else wherefore was it, Thursday last, While strolling down the valley Defenceless, musing as I passd A canzonet to Sally; A wolf, with mouth protruding snout, Forth from the thicket bounded I clapped my hands and raised a shout He heardand fledconfounded. Bohan Upaschar 135 to 144 of bkgnd field id 1CardBohan Upaschar 427 to 436 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935074 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false4ZEROV%ZV[VVV`VaVV$V%He mounts the summit of Mont Blanc, Or Popocatapetl. On Chimborazos breathless height, He treads oer burning lava; Or snuffs the Bohan Upas blight, The deathful plant of Java. Through every peril he shall pass, By Virtues shield protected; And still by Truths unerring glass His path shall be directed. Else wherefore was it, Thursday last, While strolling down the valley Defenceless, musing as I passd A canzonet to Sally; A wolf, with mouth protruding snout, Forth from the thicket bounded I cmouth protruding snout, Forth from the thicket bounded I cthicket bounded I c CARDXJ@, s960[John Quincy AdamsSR )V*aVbVV "V#_V`VVXII. I want (who does not want?) a wife, Affectionate and fair, To solace all the woes of life, And all its joys to share; Of temper sweet, of yielding will, Of firm, yet placid mind, With all my faults to love me still, With sentiment refind. XIII. And as Times car incessant runs, And Fortune fills my store, I want of daughters and of sons From eight to half a score. I want (alas! can mortal dare Such bliss on earth to crave?) That all the girls be chaste and fair The boys all wise and brave. 4VV"V#_V`VVXII. I want (who does not want?) a wife, Affectionate and fair, To solace all the woes of life, And all its joys to share; Of temper sweet, of yielding will, Of firm, yet placid mind, With all my faults to love me still, With sentiment refind. XIII. And as Times car incessant runs, And Fortune fills my store, I want of daughters and of sons From eight to half a score. I want (alas! can mortal dare Such bliss on earth to crave?) That all the girls be chaste and fair The boys all wise and brave. @CARD@1 s9126[John PierpontnJuVvVRrX_V`lrpV y And from its force, nor doors nor locks Can shield you;t is the ballot-box. Black as your deed shall be the balls That from that box shall pour like hail! And, when the storm upon you falls, How will your craven cheeks turn pale! For, at its coming though ye laugh, T will sweep you from your hall, like chaff. Not women, now,the people pray. Hear us,or from us ye will hear! Beware!a desperate game ye play! The men that thicken in your rear, Kings though ye be,may not be scorned. Look to your move! your stake!YERE WARNED! 9! VRrX_V`lrpVVAnd from its force, nor doors nor locks Can shield you;t is the ballot-box. Black as your deed shall be the balls That from that box shall pour like hail! And, when the storm upon you falls, How will your craven cheeks turn pale! For, at its coming though ye laugh, T will sweep you from your hall, like chaff. Not women, now,the people pray. Hear us,or from us ye will hear! Beware!a desperate game ye play! The men that thicken in your rear, Kings though ye be,may not be scorned. Look to your move! your stake!YERE WARNED! 9! CARDl@5 vs9195[Fitz-Greene HalleckC&V$V%VVHer soldier, closing with the foe, Gives for thy sake a deadlier blow; His plighted maiden, when she fears For him, the joy of her young years, Thinks of thy fate, and checks her tears: And she, the mother of thy boys, Though in her eye and faded cheek Is read the grief she will not speak, The memory of her buried joys, And even she who gave thee birth, Will, by their pilgrim-circled hearth, Talk of thy doom without a sigh: For thou art Freedoms now, and Fames; One of the few, the immortal names, That were not born to die. 13V%VVHer soldier, closing with the foe, Gives for thy sake a deadlier blow; His plighted maiden, when she fears For him, the joy of her young years, Thinks of thy fate, and checks her tears: And she, the mother of thy boys, Though in her eye and faded cheek Is read the grief she will not speak, The memory of her buried joys, And even she who gave thee birth, Will, by their pilgrim-circled hearth, Talk of thy doom without a sigh: For thou art Freedoms now, and Fames; One of the few, the immortal names, That were not born to die. 13CARD E h=No more! A moment so he held it only, Then his hand sank into its former rest. Long the disciples pondered on the lesson. Much they discussed its mystery and meaning, Each finding something he could make his own, Some hope or danger in the Noble Way, Some guide or warning to the Perfect Life. Among them sat the last of the disciples, Listening and pondering, silently and still; And when the scholars found no certain meaning In Buddhas answer to Malunkas prayer, The young man pondered: I will seek my father, The wisest man of all men in the world, And he with one word will reveal this secret, And make me in an instant reach the light Which these in many years have not attained Though guided by the Buddha and the Law. So the boy sought his fatheran old man Famous for human wisdom, subtle counsel, [ Henry Adamss925051 nef0 9Td it only, Then his hand sank into its former rest. Long the disciples pondered on the lesson. Much they discussed its mystery and meaning, Each finding something he could make his own, Some hope or danger in the Noble Way, Some guide or warning to the Perfect Life. Among them sat the last of the disciples, Listening and pondering, silently and still; And when the scholars found no certain meaning In Buddhas answer to Malunkas prayer, The young man pondered: I will seek my father, The wisest man of all men in the world, And he with one word will reveal this secret, And make me in an instant reach the light Which these in many years have not attained Though guided by the Buddha and the Law. So the boy sought his fatheran old man Famous for human wisdom, subtle counsel, nef0 9T`CARD@NW s9572[Ralph Waldo EmersoniAnd brims my little cup; heedless, alas! Of all he sheds how little it will hold, How much runs over on the desert sands. If a new Muse draw me with splendid ray, And I uplift myself into its heaven, The needs of the first sight absorb my blood, And all the following hours of the day Drag a ridiculous age. To-day, when friends approach, and every hour Brings book, or starbright scroll of genius, The little cup will hold not a bead more, And all the costly liquor runs to waste; Nor gives the jealous lord one diamond drop So to be husbanded for poorer days. Why need I volumes, if one word suffice? Why need I galleries, when a pupils draught After the masters sketch fills and oerfills My apprehension? why seek Italy, Who cannot circumnavigate the sea Of thoughts and things at home, but still adjourn The nearest matters for a thousand days? 29"s"alas! Of all he sheds how little it will hold, How much runs over on the desert sands. If a new Muse draw me with splendid ray, And I uplift myself into its heaven, The needs of the first sight absorb my blood, And all the following hours of the day Drag a ridiculous age. To-day, when friends approach, and every hour Brings book, or starbright scroll of genius, The little cup will hold not a bead more, And all the costly liquor runs to waste; Nor gives the jealous lord one diamond drop So to be husbanded for poorer days. Why need I volumes, if one word suffice? Why need I galleries, when a pupils draught After the masters sketch fills and oerfills My apprehension? why seek Italy, Who cannot circumnavigate the sea Of thoughts and things at home, but still adjourn The nearest matters for a thousand days? 29"s" CARD@R@ s9627[Ralph Waldo EmersonɀVThe threads of man at their humming-wheel, The threads of life, and power, and pain, So sweet and mournful falls the strain. And best can teach its Delphian chord How Nature to the soul is moored, If once again that silent string, As erst it wont, would thrill and ring. Not long ago, at eventide, It seemed, so listening, at my side A window rose, and, to say sooth, I looked forth on the fields of youth: I saw fair boys bestriding steeds, I knew their forms in fancy weeds, Long, long concealed by sundering fates, Mates of my youth,yet not my mates, Stronger and bolder far than I, With grace, with genius, well attired, And then as now from far admired, Followed with love They knew not of, ɀVThe threads of man at their humming-wheel, The threads of life, and power, and pain, So sweet and mournful falls the strain. And best can teach its Delphian chord How Nature to the soul is moored, If once again that silent string, As erst it wont, would thrill and ring. Not long ago, at eventide, It seemed, so listening, at my side A window rose, and, to say sooth, I looked forth on the fields of youth: I saw fair boys bestriding steeds, I knew their forms in fancy weeds, Long, long concealed by sundering fates, Mates of my youth,yet not my mates, Stronger and bolder far than I, With grace, with genius, well attired, And then as now from far admired, Followed with love They knew not of, 29!żذs!ŬCARD\@, hs964[John Quincy Adams:R !V"bVcVV VUVVVVXX. I want uninterrupted health, Throughout my long career, And streams of never-failing wealth, To scatter far and near; The destitute to clothe and feed, Free bounty to bestow; Supply the helpless orphans need, And soothe the widows woe. XXI. I want the genius to conceive, The talents to unfold, Designs, the vicious to retrieve, The virtuous to uphold; Inventive power, combining skill, A persevering soul, Of human hearts to mould the will, And reach from pole to pole. 4pole. bVcVVVUVVVVXX. I want uninterrupted health, Throughout my long career, And streams of never-failing wealth, To scatter far and near; The destitute to clothe and feed, Free bounty to bestow; Supply the helpless orphans need, And soothe the widows woe. XXI. I want the genius to conceive, The talents to unfold, Designs, the vicious to retrieve, The virtuous to uphold; Inventive power, combining skill, A persevering soul, Of human hearts to mould the will, And reach from pole to pole. pole. CARD]m@, rs965[John Quincy AdamsDR +V,lVmVV  ,V-cVdVVXXII. I want the seals of power and place, The ensigns of command, Charged by the peoples unbought grace, To rule my native land. Nor crown, nor sceptre would I ask But from my countrys will, By day, by night, to ply the task Her cup of bliss to fill. XXIII. I want the voice of honest praise To follow me behind, And to be thought in future days The friend of human kind; That after ages, as they rise, Exulting may proclaim, In choral union to the skies, Their blessings on my name. 4VV,V-cVdVVXXII. I want the seals of power and place, The ensigns of command, Charged by the peoples unbought grace, To rule my native land. Nor crown, nor sceptre would I ask But from my countrys will, By day, by night, to ply the task Her cup of bliss to fill. XXIII. I want the voice of honest praise To follow me behind, And to be thought in future days The friend of human kind; That after ages, as they rise, Exulting may proclaim, In choral union to the skies, Their blessings on my name. CARD`7@- s968[John Quincy Adams~j> r *+PQtVuVV 7V8{V|VVTo Sally Integer vit, scelerisque purus Non eget Mauris jaculis, neque arcu. The man in righteousness arrayd, A pure and blameless liver, Needs not the keen Toledo blade, Nor venom-freighted quiver. What though he wind his toilsome way Oer regions wild and weary Through Zaras burning desert stray; Or Asias jungles dreary: What though he plough the billowy deep By lunar light, or solar, Meet the resistless Simoons sweep, Or iceberg circumpolar. In bog or quagmire deep and dank, His foot shall never settle; CInteger vit, scelerisque puruschar 11 to 42 of bkgnd field id 1CardIntegerchar 106 to 113 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935074 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseNon eget Mauris jaculis, neque arcu.char 44 to 80 of bkgnd field id 1Card . . . arcu.char 114 to 126 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935074 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseZaraschar 283 to 288 of bkgnd field id 1CardZaraschar 331 to 336 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935074 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseSimoonschar 427 to 434 of bkgnd field id 1Card Simoonschar 368 to 376 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935074 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseInteger vit, scelerisque purus Non eget Mauris jaculis, neque arcu. char 11 to 81 of bkgnd field id 1CardInteger . . . arcu.char 106 to 126 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935074 of stack "really real"false4r *+PtVuVV 7V8{V|VVTo Sally Integer vit, scelerisque purus Non eget Mauris jaculis, neque arcu. The man in righteousness arrayd, A pure and blameless liver, Needs not the keen Toledo blade, Nor venom-freighted quiver. What though he wind his toilsome way Oer regions wild and weary Through Zaras burning desert stray; Or Asias jungles dr CARD^@2I s9141[Richard Henry Danaۀ; = < >Wave chases wave in easy flow: The bay is fair and broad. II. The ripples lightly tap the boat. Loose!Give her to the wind! She flies ahead:Theyre all afloat: The strand is far behind. III. No danger reach so fair a crew! Thou goddess of the foam, Ill pay thee ever worship due, If thou wilt bring them home. IV. Fair ladies, fairer than the spray The prow is dashing wide, Soft breezes take you on your way, Soft flow the blessed tide! ÀWave chases wave in easy flow: The bay is fair and broad. II. The ripples lightly tap the boat. Loose!Give her to the wind! She flies ahead:Theyre all afloat: The strand is far behind. III. No danger reach so fair a crew! Thou goddess of the foam, Ill pay thee ever worship due, If thou wilt bring them home. IV. Fair ladies, fairer than the spray The prow is dashing wide, Soft breezes take you on your way, Soft flow the blessed tide! 11the blessed tide CARDe@- \s974[James Kirke Paulding2uv}The weltering waves, unheard, were seen to flow Round West Points rude and adamantine base, That calld to mind old ARNOLDS deep disgrace, ANDRES hard fate, lamented, though deservd, And men, who from their duty never swervd The HONEST THREEthe pride of yeomen bold, Who savd the country which they might have sold; Refusd the profferd bribe, and, sternly true, Did what the man that doubts them neer would do. Yes! if the Scroll of never-dying Fame, Shall tell the truth, twill bear each lowly name; And while the wretched man, who vainly tried To wound their honour, and his Countrys pride, Shall moulder in the dirt from whence he came, Forgot, or only recollected to his shame, Quoted shall be these gallant, honest men, By many a warriors voice, and poets pen, To wake the sleeping spirit of the land, And nerve with energy the patriot band. Beyond, on either side the rivers bound, Two lofty promontories darkly frownd, DARNOLDSchar 118 to 125 of bkgnd field id 1CardARNOLDSchar 711 to 718 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935074 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseThe HONEST THREEchar 232 to 247 of bkgnd field id 1Card The HONEST THREEchar 335 to 351 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935323 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseANDRESchar 142 to 148 of bkgnd field id 1CardANDRchar 105 to 109 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935323 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseANDREchar 142 to 146 of bkgnd field id 1CardANDRchar 105 to 109 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935323 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false5y frownd, The weltering waves, unheard, were seen to flow Round West Points rude and adamantine base, That calld to mind old ARNOLDS deep disgrace, ANDRES hard fate, lamented, though deservd, And men, who from their duty never swervd The HONEST THREEthe pride of yeomen bold, Who savd the country which they might have sold; Refusd the profferd bribe, and, sternly true, Did what the man that doubts them neer would do. Yes! if the Scroll of never-dying Fame, Shall tell the truth, twill bear each lowly name; And while the wretched man, who vainly tried To wound their honour, and his Countrys pride, Shall moulder in the dirt from whence he came, Forgot, or only recollected to his shame, Quoted shall be these gallant, honest men, By many a warriors voice, and poets pen, To wake the sleeping spirit of the land, And nerve with energy the patriot band. Beyond, on either side the rivers bound, Two lofty promontories darkly frownd, y frownd, @CARDfR@- s975[James Kirke Pauldingh'V3rHKVLThrough which, in times long past, as learned say, The pent up waters forcd their stubborn way; Grimly they frownd, as menacing the wave That stormd their bulwarks with its current brave, And seemd to threaten from their shatterd brow, To crush the vessels all becalmd below, Whose white sails, hanging idly at the mast, Oer the still waves a deep reflexion cast. Still farther off, the Kaatskill, bold and high, Kissd the pure concave of the arched sky, Mingled with that its waving lines of blue, And shut the world beyond from mortal view. Book II, lines 61122 Twas sunsets hallowd timeand such an eve Might almost tempt an angel Heaven to leave. Never did brighter glories greet the eye, Low in the warm, and ruddy Western sky, Nor the light clouds at Summer eve unfold More varied tints of purple, red, and gold. 5'V3rHKVLThrough which, in times long past, as learned say, The pent up waters forcd their stubborn way; Grimly they frownd, as menacing the wave That stormd their bulwarks with its current brave, And seemd to threaten from their shatterd brow, To crush the vessels all becalmd below, Whose white sails, hanging idly at the mast, Oer the still waves a deep reflexion cast. Still farther off, the Kaatskill, bold and high, Kissd the pure concave of the arched sky, Mingled with that its waving lines of blue, And shut the world beyond from mortal view. Book II, lines 61122 Twas sunsets hallowd timeand such an eve Might almost tempt an angel Heaven to leave. Never did brighter glories greet the eye, Low in the warm, and ruddy Western sky, Nor the light clouds at Summer eve unfold More varied tints of purple, red, and gold. 5CARD D6(V)VV,V-VV The robin, that was busy all the June, Before the sun had kissed the topmost bough, Catching our hearts up in his golden tune, Has given place to the brown cricket now. The very cock crows lonesomely at morn Each flag and fern the shrinking stream divides Uneasy cattle low, and lambs forlorn Creep to their strawy sheds with nettled sides. Shut up the door: who loves me must not look Upon the withered world, but haste to bring His lighted candle, and his story-book, And live with me the poetry of Spring. [ Alice CarysD6(V)VV,V-VV The robin, that was busy all the June, Before the sun had kissed the topmost bough, Catching our hearts up in his golden tune, Has given place to the brown cricket now. The very cock crows lonesomely at morn Each flag and fern the shrinking stream divides Uneasy cattle low, and lambs forlorn Creep to their strawy sheds with nettled sides. Shut up the door: who loves me must not look Upon the withered world, but haste to bring His lighted candle, and his story-book, And live with me the poetry of Spring. 1191968/-6/<<CARD B? f;&&V'eVfVVHe were nt no saint,but at jedgment Id run my chance with Jim, Longside of some pious gentlemen That would nt shook hands with him. He seen his duty, a dead-sure thing, And went for it thar and then; And Christ aint a going to be too hard On a man that died for men.[ John Hays9250250V'eVfVVHe were nt no saint,but at jedgment Id run my chance with Jim, Longside of some pious gentlemen That would nt shook hands with him. He seen his duty, a dead-sure thing, And went for it thar and then; And Christ aint a going to be too hard On a man that died for men.50@CARDh@- s977[James Kirke Paulding]VrVThe silent dews of evening dropt like balm; The hungry nighthawk from his lone haunt hies, To chase the viewless insect through the skies; The bat began his lantern loving flight, The lonely whip-poor-will, our bird of night, Ever unseen, yet ever seeming near, His shrill note quaverd in the startled ear; The buzzing beetle forth did gayly hie, With idle hum, and careless blundring eye; The little trusty watchman of pale night, The firefly, trimmd anew his lamp so bright, And took his merry airy circuit round The sparkling meadows green and fragrant bound, Where blossomd clover, bathd in balmy dew, In fair luxuriance, sweetly blushing grew. Book II, lines 167208 Here lay dark Pittsburgh, from whose site there broke The manufacturers black and sparkling smoke, Where Industry and useful Science reignd, 5The silent dews of evening dropt like balm; The hungry nighthawk from his lone haunt hies, To chase the viewless insect through the skies; The bat began his lantern loving flight, The lonely whip-poor-will, our bird of night, Ever unseen, yet ever seeming near, His shrill note quaverd in the startled ear; The buzzing beetle forth did gayly hie, With idle hum, and careless blundring eye; The little trusty watchman of pale night, The firefly, trimmd anew his lamp so bright, And took his merry airy circuit round The sparkling meadows green and fragrant bound, Where blossomd clover, bathd in balmy dew, In fair luxuriance, sweetly blushing grew. Book II, lines 167208 Here lay dark Pittsburgh, from whose site there broke The manufacturers black and sparkling smoke, Where Industry and useful Science reignd, 5 CARDm@- ~s980[James Kirke PauldingKVr34V5Cherish her old absurdities as new, And all her cast-off follies here renew; Statesmen no more from thence their precepts draw, And borrow both their reason and their law, Like advertising quacks, right wondrous sage, With the same nostrums cure both youth and age, And blundering up the lofty steeps of fame, Break down the vigour of our youthful frame, With stimulatives, fitted to revive Some worn out profligate, scarce half alive; When Mind at last shall break its rusty chain, And here, our chosen monarch, freely reign. Book II, lines 553606 Tis trueyet tis no pity that tis true, Many fine things they neither felt nor knew. Unlike the sons of Europes happier clime, They never died to musics melting chime, Or groand, as if in agonizing pain, At some enervate, whining, sickly strain; 5's'ish her old absurdities as new, And all her cast-off follies here renew; Statesmen no more from thence their precepts draw, And borrow both their reason and their law, Like advertising quacks, right wondrous sage, With the same nostrums cure both youth and age, And blundering up the lofty steeps of fame, Break down the vigour of our youthful frame, With stimulatives, fitted to revive Some worn out profligate, scarce half alive; When Mind at last shall break its rusty chain, And here, our chosen monarch, freely reign. Book II, lines 553606 Tis trueyet tis no pity that tis true, Many fine things they neither felt nor knew. Unlike the sons of Europes happier clime, They never died to musics melting chime, Or groand, as if in agonizing pain, At some enervate, whining, sickly strain; 5's'CARDG@/y s9109[Washington AllstonVVV CVD^V`VVVVV2V4QVRkVmVVV V Though ages long have past Since our Fathers left their home, Their pilot in the blast, Oer untravelld seas to roam, Yet lives the blood of England in our veins! And shall we not proclaim That blood of honest fame Which no tyranny can tame By its chains? While the language free and bold Which the Bard of Avon sung, In which our Milton told How the vault of Heaven rung When Satan, blasted, fell with his host; While this, with revrence meet, Ten thousand echoes greet, From rock to rock repeat Round our coast; 8&x4s@>&x$@C^V`VVVVV2V4QVRkVmVVV V Though ages long have past Since our Fathers left their home, Their pilot in the blast, Oer untravelld seas to roam, Yet lives the blood of England in our veins! And shall we not proclaim That blood of honest fame Which no tyranny can tame By its chains? While the language free and bold Which the Bard of Avon sung, In which our Milton told How the vault of Heaven rung When Satan, blasted, fell with his host; While this, with revrence meet, Ten thousand echoes greet, From rock to rock repeat Round our coast; 8&x4s@>&x$@CCARD@/y ls9110[Washington Allston<V$V&BVCbVd333333VVVV>&q',q-2q35q6;q<BqCFqGJqK While the manners, while the arts, That mould a nations soul, Still cling around our hearts Between let ocean roll, Our joint communion breaking with the Sun: Yet still from either beach The voice of blood shall reach, More audible than speech, We are One. Coleridge And thou art gone most loved, most honord friend! Nonever more thy gentle voice shall blend With air of earth its pure ideal tones Binding in one, as with harmonious zones, The heart and intellect. And I no more Shall with thee gaze on that unfathomd deep, The Human Soul; as when, pushd off the shore, Thy mystic bark would thro the darkness sweep 8&q(sUU&qLO333333VVVVr&q',q-2q35q6;q<BqCFqGJqK While the manners, while the arts, That mould a nations soul, Still cling around our hearts Between let ocean roll, Our joint communion breaking with the Sun: Yet still from either beach The voice of blood shall reach, More audible than speech, We are One. Coleridge And thou art gone most loved, most honord friend! Nonever more thy gentle voice shall blend With air of earth its pure ideal tones Binding in one, as with harmonious zones, The heart and intellect. And I no more Shall with thee gaze on that unfathomd deep, The Human Soul; as when, pushd off the shore, Thy mystic bark would thro the darkness sweep 8&q(sUU&qLOCARDP|@.f zs981[James Kirke PauldingHNor would they sell their heritage of rights, For long processions, fetes, and pretty sights, Or barter for a bauble, or a feast, All that distinguishes the man from beast. With them, alas! the fairest masterpiece, Of beggard Italy, or rifled Greece, A chiselld wonder, or a thing of paint, A marble godhead, or a canvass saint, Were poor amends for cities wrapt in flame, A ruind land and deep dishonourd name; Nor would they mourn Apollo sent away, More than the loss of Freedoms glorious day; Among them was no drivling princely race, Whod beggar half a state, to buy a vase, Or starve a province nobly to reclaim, From mother Earth, a thing without a name, Some mutilated trunk decayd and worn, Of head bereft, of legs and arms all shorn, Worthless, except to puzzle learned brains, And cause a world of most laborious pains, 5ould they sell their heritage of rights, For long processions, fetes, and pretty sights, Or barter for a bauble, or a feast, All that distinguishes the man from beast. With them, alas! the fairest masterpiece, Of beggard Italy, or rifled Greece, A chiselld wonder, or a thing of paint, A marble godhead, or a canvass saint, Were poor amends for cities wrapt in flame, A ruind land and deep dishonourd name; Nor would they mourn Apollo sent away, More than the loss of Freedoms glorious day; Among them was no drivling princely race, Whod beggar half a state, to buy a vase, Or starve a province nobly to reclaim, From mother Earth, a thing without a name, Some mutilated trunk decayd and worn, Of head bereft, of legs and arms all shorn, Worthless, except to puzzle learned brains, And cause a world of most laborious pains, 5CARD@/y s9105[Washington Allston>*7f8On Rembrant; Occasioned by His Picture of Jacobs Dream As in that twilight, superstitious age When all beyond the narrow grasp of mind Seemd fraught with meanings of supernal kind, When een the learned philosophic sage, Wont with the stars thro boundless space to range, Listend with revrence to the changelings tale; Een so, thou strangest of all beings strange! Een so thy visionary scenes I hail; That like the ramblings of an idiots speech, No image giving of a thing on earth, Nor thought significant in Reasons reach, Yet in their random shadowings give birth To thoughts and things from other worlds that come, And fill the soul, and strike the reason dumb. Jacobs Dreamchar 43 to 55 of bkgnd field id 1Card Jacobs Dreamchar 358 to 371 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935519 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false8*7On Rembrant; Occasioned by His Picture of Jacobs Dream As in that twilight, superstitious age When all beyond the narrow grasp of mind Seemd fraught with meanings of supernal kind, When een the learned philosophic sage, Wont with the stars thro boundless space to range, Listend with revrence to the changelings tale; Een so, thou strangest of all beings strange! Een so thy visionary scenes I hail; That like the ramblings of an idiots speech, No image giving of a thing on earth, Nor thought significant in Reasons reach, Yet in their random shadowings give birth To thoughts and things from other worlds that come, And fill the soul, and strike the reason dumb. 8CARD^6@>D s9329[William Cullen Bryant(V)tVu Six centuries, since the poets birth, Have come and flitted oer our sphere: The richest harvest reaped on earth Crowns the last centurys closing year. (V)tVu Six centuries, since the poets birth, Have come and flitted oer our sphere: The richest harvest reaped on earth Crowns the last centurys closing year. 18CARD@cw Rs9876[John Greenleaf Whittier&4V6`VbVVThrough the street, on either side, Up flew windows, doors swung wide; Sharp-tongued spinsters, old wives gray, Treble lent the fish-horns bray. Sea-worn grandsires, cripple-bound, Hulks of old sailors run aground, Shook head, and fist, and hat, and cane, And cracked with curses the hoarse refrain: Heres Flud Oirson, fur his horrd horrt, Torrd an futherrd an corrd in a corrt By the women o Morbleead! Sweetly along the Salem road Bloom of orchard and lilac showed. Little the wicked skipper knew Of the fields so green and the sky so blue. Riding there in his sorry trim, Like an Indian idol glum and grim, Scarcely he seemed the sound to hear Of voices shouting far and near: Heres Flud Oirson, fur his horrd horrt, 30 -- on mousedown global popuptext,namelist,idlist,firstname,theText,FIC if not CDs() then exit mousedown if not (name of target contains "field") then exit mousedown if the selectedchunkempty then select empty put myCx("L") into cl put myCx("C") into cc if mouse()"up" then get mouseMoved(cl) if it3 then domarktext exit mousedown end if put getClickedWord(last word of cc,char 1 of word 6 of cc,"",cl) into ct if popuptext="" then put tStr("LibMsg",2) into popuptext put "28000 or number of chars in idlist>28000) nextbusy put RCN() into T find whole thetext of marked cds if TRCN() then subtract 1 from mct put foundchunk() into tc put RCN() &","&tc into thisid if thisid=line 1 of idlist then exit repeat put thisid&return after idlist put char 1 of word 6 of tc into ft put word 8 of tc into fn if ft="b" then put char(max((word 2 of tc-20),1)) to (min((word 4 of tc+20),(number of chars in fld fn))) of fld fn into tln end if if ft="c" then put char(max((word 2 of tc-20),1)) to (min((word 4 of tc+20),(number of chars in cd fld fn))) of cd fld fn into tln end if if word 1 of tln contains thetext then put 1 into sw else put 2 into sw if item 1 of last word of tln contains thetext then put number of words in tln into ew else put (number of words in tln-1) into ew if RCN()=firstname then put "" into SS else put "" into SS put SS&pn&((CN()) &" "& word sw to ew of tln)&", "&the last word of fld "chapter name"&"" after namelist doGauge end repeat foundmenu LM false go cd firstname end if if it=6 then cbusy put GetFilesInDir(getSFPath(),"TEXT",return) into sfp put " "&tStr("LibMsg",3) into FIC if (IsOldFind(ct,sfp)) then exit mousedown getall "whole" end if LR false if there is a fld "lasttext" then put thetext into fld "lasttext" vis "window gauge",(checked(tStr("LibMsg",43)) and RCN()1) US get empty if the foundchunkempty then do "get"&&the foundchunk if itthetext then find whole thetext put foundchunk() into fc shf fc select fc end mousedownetext then put number of words in tln into ew else put (number of words in tln-1) into ew if RCN()=firstname then put "" into SS else put "" into SS put SS&pn&((CN()) &" "& word sw to ew of tln)&", "&the last word of fld "chapter name"&"" after namelist doGauge end repeat foundmenu LM false go cd firstname end if if it=6 then cbusy put GetFilesInDir(getSFPath(),"TEXT",return) into sfp put " "&tStr("LibMsg",3) into FIC if (IsOldFind(ct,sfp)) then exit mousedown getall "whole" end if LR false if there is a fld "lasttext" then put thetext into fld "lasttext" vis "window gauge",(checked(tStr("LibMsg",43)) and RCN()1) US get empty if the foundchunkempty then do "get"&&the foundchunk if itthetext then find whole thetext put foundchunk() into fc shf fc select fc end mousedown@CARD : \FV mVnVV:V;VVV I see wide terror lit before Wild steeds, fierce herds of bison here, And, blown before the flying flame, The flying-footed deer! Long trains (with shaken bells, that moved Along red twilights sinking slow) Whose wheels grew weary on their way, Far westward, long ago; Lone wagons bivouackd in the blaze, That, long ago, streamd wildly past; Faces from that bright solitude In the hot gleam aghast! A glare of faces like a dream, No history after or before, Inside the horizon with the flames, The flamesnobody more! [John James Piatts\FV mVnVV:V;VVV I see wide terror lit before Wild steeds, fierce herds of bison here, And, blown before the flying flame, The flying-footed deer! Long trains (with shaken bells, that moved Along red twilights sinking slow) Whose wheels grew weary on their way, Far westward, long ago; Lone wagons bivouackd in the blaze, That, long ago, streamd wildly past; Faces from that bright solitude In the hot gleam aghast! A glare of faces like a dream, No history after or before, Inside the horizon with the flames, The flamesnobody more! 3892406m-sxTCARD  7CVKVAnd forest lace-work, as she moved along, Grew moist and shining. Who would eer have guessed, The queenly Night would deign to stoop and love A little flower! And yet, with all her stealth, I saw her press her damp and cooling lip Upon the feverish bosom of a Rose; At which a watchful bird poured sudden forth A love-sick song, of sweet and saddest strain. Upon the ivied rocks, and rugged crags On which the ocean billows break, she hung Her sombre mantle; and the gray old sea That had been high in tumult all the day, Became so mesmerized beneath her wiles, He seemed a mere reflection of herself. The billows sank into a dimpled sleep; Only the little tide-waves glided up To kiss the blackness of the airy robe That floated oer them. Long I stood and watched [Augusta Cooper Bristols7CVKVAnd forest lace-work, as she moved along, Grew moist and shining. Who would eer have guessed, The queenly Night would deign to stoop and love A little flower! And yet, with all her stealth, I saw her press her damp and cooling lip Upon the feverish bosom of a Rose; At which a watchful bird poured sudden forth A love-sick song, of sweet and saddest strain. Upon the ivied rocks, and rugged crags On which the ocean billows break, she hung Her sombre mantle; and the gray old sea That had been high in tumult all the day, Became so mesmerized beneath her wiles, He seemed a mere reflection of herself. The billows sank into a dimpled sleep; Only the little tide-waves glided up To kiss the blackness of the airy robe That floated oer them. Long I stood and watched 3992412m sm@CARD R X.LVOgVjVVVShall tell of the blood so freely shed To redeem the crime of the ages. Well mayst thou fight For Truth and Right, And teach a rebel foe thy might! Let a loyal heart, and undaunted will, Show the world we are a Nation still! Prophet, speak! Speak for the children of martyred sires, An offspring the most ungrateful! Warn them of Justice hurrying on, To punish a deed so hateful! O read with thy Prophetic eye, The omens of our troubled sky! What is the picture beyond the gloom? New life, new birth, or a Nations tomb?[Augusta Cooper Bristols3992415m smmShall tell of the blood so freely shed To redeem the crime of the ages. Well mayst thou fight For Truth and Right, And teach a rebel foe thy might! Let a loyal heart, and undaunted will, Show the world we are a Nation still! Prophet, speak! Speak for the children of martyred sires, An offspring the most ungrateful! Warn them of Justice hurrying on, To punish a deed so hateful! O read with thy Prophetic eye, The omens of our troubled sky! What is the picture beyond the gloom? New life, new birth, or a Nations tomb?3992415m smmCARDx`@.f s991[Washington Allston.V V V nVpVThy soul from sublunary folly First raisd to worlds above. What though be mine the treasures fair Of purple grape and yellow pear, And fruits of various hue, And harvests rich of golden grain, That dance in waves along the plain To merry song of reaping swain, Beneath the welkin blue; With these I may not urge my suit, Of Summers patient toil the fruit, For mortal purpose given: Nor may it fit my sober mood To sing of sweetly murmuring flood, Or dies of many-colourd wood, That mock the bow of heaven. But, know, twas mine the secret power That wakd thee at the midnight hour, 8V V V nVpVThy soul from sublunary folly First raisd to worlds above. What though be mine the treasures fair Of purple grape and yellow pear, And fruits of various hue, And harvests rich of golden grain, That dance in waves along the plain To merry song of reaping swain, Beneath the welkin blue; With these I may not urge my suit, Of Summers patient toil the fruit, For mortal purpose given: Nor may it fit my sober mood To sing of sweetly murmuring flood, Or dies of many-colourd wood, That mock the bow of heaven. But, know, twas mine the secret power That wakd thee at the midnight hour, CARDy'@.f s992[Washington Allstonǀ:V9VVzV|VpVr In bleak Novembers reign: Twas I the spell around thee cast, When thou didst hear the hollow blast In murmurs tell of pleasures past, That neer would come again: And led thee, when the storm was oer, To hear the sullen ocean roar, By dreadful calm opprest; Which still, though not a breeze was there, Its mountain-billows heavd in air, As if a living thing it were, That strove in vain for rest. Twas I, when thou, subdued by woe, Didst watch the leaves descending slow, To each a moral gave; And as they movd in mournful train, With rustling sound, along the plain, Taught them to sing a seraphs strain Of peace within the grave. 8 VVzV|VpVr In bleak Novembers reign: Twas I the spell around thee cast, When thou didst hear the hollow blast In murmurs tell of pleasures past, That neer would come again: And led thee, when the storm was oer, To hear the sullen ocean roar, By dreadful calm opprest; Which still, though not a breeze was there, Its mountain-billows heavd in air, As if a living thing it were, That strove in vain for rest. Twas I, when thou, subdued by woe, Didst watch the leaves descending slow, To each a moral gave; And as they movd in mournful train, With rustling sound, along the plain, Taught them to sing a seraphs strain Of peace within the grave. CARDz @.f s993[Washington Allston.DVFV2V4VV And then upraisd thy streaming eye, I met thee in the western sky In pomp of evening cloud; That, while with varying form it rolld, Some wizards castle seemd of gold, And now a crimsond knight of old, Or king in purple proud. And last, as sunk the setting sun, And Evening with her shadows dun, The gorgeous pageant past, Twas then of life a mimic shew, Of human grandeur here below, Which thus beneath the fatal blow Of Death must fall at last. Oh, then with what aspiring gaze Didst thou thy tranced vision raise To yonder orbs on high, And think how wondrous, how sublime 8V4VV And then upraisd thy streaming eye, I met thee in the western sky In pomp of evening cloud; That, while with varying form it rolld, Some wizards castle seemd of gold, And now a crimsond knight of old, Or king in purple proud. And last, as sunk the setting sun, And Evening with her shadows dun, The gorgeous pageant past, Twas then of life a mimic shew, Of human grandeur here below, Which thus beneath the fatal blow Of Death must fall at last. Oh, then with what aspiring gaze Didst thou thy tranced vision raise To yonder orbs on high, And think how wondrous, how sublime 8CARD|@.f s995[Washington Allston.IVKV/V1VVOr feeling, as the storm increasd, The love of terror nerve thy breast, Didst venture to the coast; To see the mighty war-ship leap From wave to wave upon the deep, Like chamoise goat from steep to steep, Till low in valleys lost; Then, glancing to the angry sky, Behold the clouds with fury fly The lurid moon athwart; Like armies huge in battle, throng, And pour in vollying ranks along, While piping winds in martial song To rushing war exhort: Oh, then to me thy heart be given, To me, ordaind by Him in heaven Thy nobler powers to wake. And oh! if thou with poets soul, High brooding oer the frozen pole, 8V/V1VVOr feeling, as the storm increasd, The love of terror nerve thy breast, Didst venture to the coast; To see the mighty war-ship leap From wave to wave upon the deep, Like chamoise goat from steep to steep, Till low in valleys lost; Then, glancing to the angry sky, Behold the clouds with fury fly The lurid moon athwart; Like armies huge in battle, throng, And pour in vollying ranks along, While piping winds in martial song To rushing war exhort: Oh, then to me thy heart be given, To me, ordaind by Him in heaven Thy nobler powers to wake. And oh! if thou with poets soul, High brooding oer the frozen pole, CARDR@/y s998[Washington Allston:C9DVFV&V(VV=rD Or markd the suns declining ray In thousand varying colours play Oer ice-incrusted heath, In gleams of orange now, and green, And now in red and azure sheen, Like hues on dying dolphins seen, Most lovely when in death; Or seen at dawn of eastern light The frosty toil of Fays by night On pane of casement clear, Where bright the mimic glaciers shine, And Alps, with many a mountain pine, And armed knights from Palestine In winding march appear: Twas I on each enchanting scene The charm bestowd that banishd spleen Thy bosom pure and light. But still a nobler power I claim; 8|VV=rD Or markd the suns declining ray In thousand varying colours play Oer ice-incrusted heath, In gleams of orange now, and green, And now in red and azure sheen, Like hues on dying dolphins seen, Most lovely when in death; Or seen at dawn of eastern light The frosty toil of Fays by night On pane of casement clear, Where bright the mimic glaciers shine, And Alps, with many a mountain pine, And armed knights from Palestine In winding march appear: Twas I on each enchanting scene The charm bestowd that banishd spleen Thy bosom pure and light. But still a nobler power I claim; 8|CARD @/y s9100[Washington Allston6CVE9V+V-VVThat oer thy teeming brain did raise The spirits of departed days Through all the varying year; And images of things remote, And sounds that long had ceasd to float, With every hue, and every note, As living now they were: And taught thee from the motley mass Each harmonizing part to class, (Like Natures self employd;) And then, as workd thy wayward will, From these with rare combining skill, With new-created worlds to fill Of space the mighty void. Oh then to me thy heart incline; To me whose plastick powers combine The harvest of the mind; To me, whose magic coffers bear The spoils of all the toiling year, 8VVThat oer thy teeming brain did raise The spirits of departed days Through all the varying year; And images of things remote, And sounds that long had ceasd to float, With every hue, and every note, As living now they were: And taught thee from the motley mass Each harmonizing part to class, (Like Natures self employd;) And then, as workd thy wayward will, From these with rare combining skill, With new-created worlds to fill Of space the mighty void. Oh then to me thy heart incline; To me whose plastick powers combine The harvest of the mind; To me, whose magic coffers bear The spoils of all the toiling year, 8`CARD@/y *s9102[Washington AllstonF>TfUqqqqqqqOn a Falling Group in the Last Judgement of Michael Angelo, in the Cappella Sistina How vast, how dread, oerwhelming is the thought Of Space interminable! to the soul A circling weight that crushes into nought Her mighty faculties! a wondrous whole, Without or parts, beginning, or an end! How fearful then on desprate wings to send The fancy een amid the waste profound! Yet, born as if all daring to astound, Thy giant hand, oh Angelo, hath hurld Een human forms, with all their mortal weight, Down the dread voidfall endless as their fate! Already now they seem from world to world For ages thrown; yet doomd, another past, Another still to reach, nor eer to reach the last! 8qqqqqqqOn a Falling Group in the Last Judgement of Michael Angelo, in the Cappella Sistina How vast, how dread, oerwhelming is the thought Of Space interminable! to the soul A circling weight that crushes into nought Her mighty faculties! a wondrous whole, Without or parts, beginning, or an end! How fearful then on desprate wings to send The fancy een amid the waste profound! Yet, born as if all daring to astound, Thy giant hand, oh Angelo, hath hurld Een human forms, with athout or parts, beginning, or an end! How fearful then on desprate wings to send The fancy een amid the waste profound! Yet, born as if all daring to astound, Thy giant hand, oh Angelo, hath hurld Een human forms, with a`CARD@/y <s9104[Washington AllstonՀ>"3>PfQOn Seeing the Picture of olus by Peligrino Tibaldi, in the Institute at Bologna Full well, Tibaldi, did thy kindred mind The mighty spell of Bonarroti own. Like one who, reading magick words, receives The gift of intercourse with worlds unknown, Twas thine, decyphring Natures mystick leaves, To hold strange converse with the viewless wind; To see the Spirits, in embodied forms, Of gales and whirlwinds, hurricanes and storms. For, lo! obedient to thy bidding, teems Fierce into shape their stern relentless Lord: His form of motion ever-restless seems; Or, if to rest inclind his turbid soul, On Heclas top to stretch, and give the word To subject Winds that sweep the desert pole. 2Peligrino Tibaldichar 35 to 51 of bkgnd field id 1Card Peligrino Tibaldichar 208 to 225 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935519 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseBonarrotichar 144 to 152 of bkgnd field id 1CardBonarrotichar 286 to 294 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935519 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false8On Seeing the Picture of olus by Peligrino Tibaldi, in the Institute at Bologna Full well, Tibaldi, did thy kindred mind The mighty spell of Bonarroti own. Like one who, reading magick words, receives The gift of intercourse with worlds unknown, Twas thine, decyphring Natures mystick leaves, To hold strange converse with the viewless wind; To see the Spirits, in embodied forms, Of gales and whirlwinds, hurricanes and storms. For, lo! obedient to thy bidding, teems Fierce into shape their stern relentless Lord: His form of motion ever-restless seems; Or, if to rest inclind his turbid soul, On Heclas top to stretch, and give the word To subject Winds that sweep the desert pole. 8 CARDS@0 s9117[Washington Allstonˀ+Q,WQZ>kQmQVQQQVAQBGQHsQt{Q|V}QQQQV3QHow fearful, then, that the first evil ray, Still red with Abels blood, is on its way! On Michael Angelo T is not to honor thee by verse of mine I bear a record of thy wondrous power; Thou standst alone, and needest not to shine With borrowed lustre: for the light is thine Which no man giveth; and, though comets lower Portentous round thy sphere, thou still art bright; Though many a satellite about thee fall, Leaving their stations merged in trackless night, Yet take not they from that supernal light Which lives within thee, sole, and free of all. 8&6քs,,&6,,QVQQQVAQBGQHsQt{Q|V}QQQQV3QHow fearful, then, that the first evil ray, Still red with Abels blood, is on its way! On Michael Angelo T is not to honor thee by verse of mine I bear a record of thy wondrous power; Thou standst alone, and needest not to shine With borrowed lustre: for the light is thine Which no man giveth; and, though comets lower Portentous round thy sphere, thou still art bright; Though many a satellite about thee fall, Leaving their stations merged in trackless night, Yet take not they from that supernal light Which lives within thee, sole, and free of all. 8&6քs,,&6,,CARD@0 s9116[Washington AllstonV,Q-V.XQYVZ~QQ>QQQ0Q1]?^QQrQQ4Q5`QafQgQQQQ In wishing merely, where resolves but spend Themselves resolving,as his will did lend Not counsel een his body to defend. Or Kean or Hamlet,what I see is real! A Word: Man How vast a world is figured by a word! A little word, a very point of sound, Breathed by a breath, and in an instant heard; Yet leaving that may well the soul astound, To sense a shape, to thought without a bound. For who shall hope the mystery to scan Of that dark being symbolized in man? His outward form seems but a speck in space: But what far star shall check the eternal race Of one small thought that rays from out his mind? For evil, or for good, still, still must travel on His every thought, though worlds are left behind, Nor backward can the race be ever run. 8V,Q-V.XQYVZ~QQrQQQ0Q1]Q^QQrQQ4Q5`QafQgQQQQ In wishing merely, where resolves but spend Themselves resolving,as his will did lend Not counsel een his body to defend. Or Kean or Hamlet,what I see is real! A Word: Man How vast a world is figured by a word! A little word, a very point of sound, Breathed by a breath, and in an instant heard; Yet leaving that may well the soul astound, To sense a shape, to thought without a bound. For who shall hope the mystery to scan Of that dark being symbolized in man? His outward form seems but a speck in space: But what far star shall check the eternal race Of one small thought that rays from out his mind? For evil, or for good, still, still must travel on His every thought, though worlds are left behind, Nor backward can the race be ever run. 8 CARDf@0 s9123[John PierpontԀVOf waveless water, rest her radiant head. How mild the empire of that virgin queen! How dark the mountains shade! how still the scene! Hushd by her silver sceptre, zephyrs sleep On dewy leaves, that overhang the deep, Nor dare to whisper through the boughs, nor stir The valleys willow, nor the mountains fir, Nor make the pale and breathless aspen quiver, Nor brush, with ruffling wing, that glassy river. Hark!tis a convents bell:its midnight chime. For music measures even the march of Time: Oer bending trees, that fringe the distant shore, Gray turrets rise:the eye can catch no more. The boatman, listening to the tolling bell, Suspends his oar:a low and solemn swell, From the deep shade, that round the cloister lies, Rolls through the air, and on the water dies. What melting song wakes the cold ear of Night? A funeral dirge, that pale nuns, robd in white, Chant round a sisters dark and narrow bed, To charm the parting spirit of the dead. 9ess water, rest her radiant head. How mild the empire of that virgin queen! How dark the mountains shade! how still the scene! Hushd by her silver sceptre, zephyrs sleep On dewy leaves, that overhang the deep, Nor dare to whisper through the boughs, nor stir The valleys willow, nor the mountains fir, Nor make the pale and breathless aspen quiver, Nor brush, with ruffling wing, that glassy river. Hark!tis a convents bell:its midnight chime. For music measures even the march of Time: Oer bending trees, that fringe the distant shore, Gray turrets rise:the eye can catch no more. The boatman, listening to the tolling bell, Suspends his oar:a low and solemn swell, From the deep shade, that round the cloister lies, Rolls through the air, and on the water dies. What melting song wakes the cold ear of Night? A funeral dirge, that pale nuns, robd in white, Chant round a sisters dark and narrow bed, To charm the parting spirit of the dead. 9`CARDX@0 s9125[John Pierpont{*Q+2Q3^Q_eQfQQQQQ<Q=fQgQ)V7rDG9L>dVVThe scorching bolt, that from thine armory hurld, Burns its red path, and cleaves a shrinking world; All these are music to Religions ear; Music, thy hand awakes, for man to hear. Thy hand invested in their azure robes, Thy breath made buoyant yonder circling globes, That bound and blaze along the elastic wires, That viewless vibrate on celestial lyres, And in that high and radiant concave tremble, Beneath whose dome, adoring hosts assemble, To catch the notes, from those bright spheres that flow, Which mortals dream of, but which angels know. lines 752777 from A Word from a Petitioner A weapon that comes down as still As snow-flakes fall upon the sod; But executes a freemans will As lightning does the will of God; 9+2Q3^Q_eQfQQQQQ<Q=fQgQ)V7rDLrdVVThe scorching bolt, that from thine armory hurld, Burns its red path, and cleaves a shrinking world; All these are music to Religions ear; Music, thy hand awakes, for man to hear. Thy hand invested in their azure robes, Thy breath made buoyant yonder circling globes, That bound and blaze along the elastic wires, That viewless vibrate on celestial lyres, And in that high and radiant concave tremble, Beneath whose dome, adoring hosts assemble, To catch the notes, from those bright spheres that flow, Which mortals dream of, but which angels know. lines 752777 from A Word from a Petitioner A weapon that comes down as still As snow-flakes fall upon the sod; But executes a freemans will As lightning does the will of God; 9CARD@1 Ns9135[Richard Henry Dana(Q)0Q1YQZQQQQ-Q.4Q5`QagQhQQQQVEQFqQrxQza{rQQQQ HQIMQOr by her brooks they stand, and sip the stream; Or peering oer it,vanity well feignd In quaint approval seem to glow and nod At their reflected graces.Morn to meet, They in fantastic labours pass the night, Catching its dews, and rounding silvery drops To deck their bosoms.There, on tall, bald trees, From varnishd cells some peep, and the old boughs Make to rejoice and dance in the unseen winds. Over my head the winds and they make music; And grateful, in return for what they take, Bright hues and odours to the air they give. Thus mutual love brings mutual delight Brings beauty, life;for love is lifehate, death. Thou Prophet of so fair a revelation! Thou who abodst with us the winter long, Enduring cold or rain, and shaking oft, From thy dark mantle, falling sleet or snow Thou, who with purpose kind, when warmer days 11 d, when warmer d CARD@1 s9128[John PierpontӀ6sVtVSVTV,V-wVxFor, all the host around thee burning, Like faithless man, keep turning, turning. I may not follow where they go: Star of the North, I look to thee While on I press; for well I know Thy light and truth shall set me free; Thy light, that no poor slave deceiveth; Thy truth, that all my soul believeth. They of the East beheld the star That over Bethlehems manger glowed; With joy they hailed it from afar, And followed where it marked the road, Till, where its rays directly fell, They found the Hope of Israel. Wise were the men who followed thus The star that sets man free from sin! Star of the North! thou art to us, Whore slaves because we wear a skin 9SVTV,V-wVxFor, all the host around thee burning, Like faithless man, keep turning, turning. I may not follow where they go: Star of the North, I look to thee While on I press; for well I know Thy light and truth shall set me free; Thy light, that no poor slave deceiveth; Thy truth, that all my soul believeth. They of the East beheld the star That over Bethlehems manger glowed; With joy they hailed it from afar, And followed where it marked the road, Till, where its rays directly fell, They found the Hope of Israel. Wise were the men who followed thus The star that sets man free from sin! Star of the North! thou art to us, Whore slaves because we wear a skin 9`CARD@1 s9131[John Pierpont 2\bVcV;V<VIve felt her talons and her beak, And now the gentler Lion seek. The Lion, at the Virgins feet Crouches, and lays his mighty paw Into her lap!an emblem meet Of Englands Queen and English law: Queen, that hath made her Islands free! Law, that holds out its shield to me! Star of the North! upon that shield Thou shinest!O, for ever shine! The negro, from the cotton-field, Shall then beneath its orb recline, And feed the Lion couched before it, Nor heed the Eagle screaming oer it!cIve felt her talons and her beak,char 1 to 34 of bkgnd field id 1Card. char 30 to 31 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 936275 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseAnd now the gentler Lion seek.char 36 to 65 of bkgnd field id 1CardVirchar 32 to 34 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 936275 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseThe Lion, at the Virginschar 68 to 92 of bkgnd field id 1Cardginschar 35 to 39 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 936275 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseQueen, that hath made her Islands free!char 201 to 239 of bkgnd field id 1CardQueen . . . free!char 161 to 177 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 936275 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseIve felt her talons and her beak, And now the gentler Lion seek. The Lion, at the Virginschar 1 to 92 of bkgnd field id 1CardVirginschar 32 to 39 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 936275 of stack "really real"false9AC\bVcV;V<VIve felt her talons and her beak, And now the gentler Lion seek. The Lion, at the Virgins feet Crouches, and lays his mighty paw Into her lap!an emblem meet Of Englands Queen and English law: Queen, that hath made her Islands free! Law, that holds out its shield to me! Star of the North! upon that shieCARD 7c V.x`chapter titleon mousedown showcontents end mousedownPw) overheadon mousedown showcontents end mousedown$FORCEYTHE WILLSON (18371867)ހ>>2V3rVsVVBVCV The Estray Now tell me, my merry woodman, Why standest so aghast? My lord!t was a beautiful creature That hath but just gone past! A creaturewhat kind of a creature? Nay now, but I do not know! Humphwhat did it make you think of? The sunshine on the snow. I shall overtake my horse then: The woodman opened his eye: The gold fell all around him, And a rainbow spanned the sky. [Forceythe WilsonAs New Chapter Forceythe Wilson Forceythe Wilson Forceythe Wilson9246446" S,M FORCEYTHE WILLSON (April 10, 1837February 2, 1867) b. Byron Forceythe Willson in Little Genesee, New York. Son of Hiram Willson (teacher who served as local postmaster and operated lumber business). In 1846 moved with family on raft down Allegheny and Ohio rivers; lived in Covington, Kentucky, where his father founded common school system; family settled in New Albany, Indiana, where father died in 1859 leaving comfortable income to family. Studied at Antioch College and then at Harvard, until failing health forced him to withdraw without taking degree. Returned to Kentucky, where he wrote pro-Union editorials for the Louisville Journal; also published poems there, of which The Old Sergeant became well-known. In 1863 married Elizabeth Conwell Smith, also a poet. Settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts, 186466, to supervise his younger brothers education at Harvard. Literary acquaintances included Oliver Wendell Holmes, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and William Dean Howells. Developed interest in spiritualism. The Old Sergeant and Other Poems appeared in 1867. Died in Alfred, New York.L2CARDdh=: [ Index of Titles and First Liness94138Qrr$%r./r78rDErZ[rghrvrrrr"$r/0rBrrChildrens Hour, Th e Chinook Songs Christmas Circles Circumstance City in the Sea, The City Lyrics City of Orgies City of orgies, walks and joys, City of the Silent, The, from City Visions Clarel: A Poem and Pilgrimage in the Holy Land, from Clear the way there Jonathan! Cleopatra Clerks, The Cliff Klingenhagen Cliff Klingenhagen had me in to dine Close cleaving unto Silence, into sound Cloud, The Clouds of dust arise, rolling up from earth, Clover 49d766 3105 2199 633 2161 987 671 1621 1621 681 2650 1822 1559 1266 2890 2896 2896 2636 2552 3192 2566 dine Close cleadrens Hour, Th e Chinook Songs Christmas Circles Circumstance City in the Sea, The City Lyrics City of Orgies City of orgies, walks and joys, City of the Silent, The, from City Visions Clarel: A Poem and Pilgrimage in the Holy Land, from Clear the way there Jonathan! Cleopatra Clerks, The Cliff Klingenhagen Cliff Klingenhagen had me in to dine Close cleaving unto Silence, into sound Cloud, The Clouds of dust arise, rolling up from earth, Clover 49d766 3105 2219 633 2161 987 671 1621 1621 681 2650 1822 1559 1266 2890 2896 2896 2636 2552 3192 2566 dine Close clea CARD  V.x`chapter titleon mousedown showcontents end mousedownPw) overheadon mousedown showcontents end mousedown!STEPHEN FOSTER (18261864)>>ar!"a$r67a9r^_aar Old Folks at Home Way down upon de Swanee ribber, Far, far away, Deres wha my heart is turning ebber, Deres wha de old folks stay. All up and down de whole creation, Sadly I roam, Still longing for de old plantation, And for de old folks at home. All de world am sad and dreary, Ebry where I roam, Oh! darkeys how my heart grows weary, Far from de old folks at home. [Stephen Foster;s New Chapter Stephen Foster Stephen Foster Stephen Foster9211524 074Fost1.MOV0,48474R 0 14034 16524 19384 22395 25494 27951 31953 34512 37669 40294 44767 48474x"!"T STEPHEN FOSTER (July 4, 1826January 13, 1864) b. Stephen Collins Foster in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Ninth of ten children of Eliza Clayland Tomlinson and merchant William Barclay Foster. Educated Allegheny Academy (Allegheny, Pennsylvania), and Athens Academy (Tioga Point, Pennsylvania). Briefly attended Jefferson College (Canonsburg, Pennsylvania) in July 1841; education continued in Pittsburgh by tutors. Began to compose at an early age; published first song, Open Thy Lattice, Love in 1844. Family, objecting to musical career, sent him to Cincinnati in 1846 to work as bookkeeper for brother Dunning Foster. A number of his songs were published in Songs of the Sable Harmonists (1848) and Fosters Ethiopian Melodies (1849). In 1850, success of his songs (including Louisiana Belle, O Susannah, Uncle Ned, and Away Down South) led him to return home to Pittsburgh and devote himself exclusively to music. Later that year, married Jane Denny McDowell of Pittsburgh; daughter Marion born April 1851. Songs popularized by Christys Minstrels, Campbell Minstrels, and New Orleans Serenaders; in 1851 sold exclusive pre-publication performance rights to E. P. Christy, inaugurating profitable business arrangement for both parties. During 1850s, produced series of popular songs including De Camptown Races (1850), Ring De Banjo (1851), The Old Folks at Home (1851), Massas in de Cold Ground (1852), My Old Kentucky Home (1853), Old Dog Tray (1853), Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair (1854), and Come Where My Love Lies Dreaming (1855). Thereafter productivity and popularity fell off; final minstrel hit was Old Black Joe (1860). Foster moved to New York with family in 1860; marital troubles led, by 1862, to a separation, with Jane and Marion living in Lewistown, Pennsylvania. Foster composed prolifically, but without recapturing former success; drank heavily and was reduced to poverty. Lived his last days in a Bowery hotel; died in Bellevue Hospital from wounds received when he fell in his hotel room, lacerating neck and face.Foster, Stephen,performed by William Bolcom and Joan Morris &l< FREEFree Object Russian, Serbian, Danish, Hungarian, and other languages, as well as composing original poems in some of these languages; wrote songs in support of William Henry Harrison, published in The New Haven Whig Song Book (1840); The Dream of a Day, and Other Poems, final collection of poems and translations, appeared in 1843. Lived in seclusion for some years at state hospital in New Haven. From 1851 to 1854 surveyed lead mines in Illinois and Wisconsin for American Mining Company; shortly before his death, appointed state geologist of Wisconsin; traveled throughout Wisconsin, spending time with Winnebago and Ojibwa tribes. Died at Hazel Green, Wisconsin. Two-volume edition of his collected works published posthumously in 1859. rQV9Q:CARD@3 s9168[Richard Henry Wilde3 *Himself the Bruce of this the Western Nile: At travellers vanity how woodsmen smile! At thy true sources the red Indian drank, Ay, and the weary hunter quenched his thirst, Nor paused the Naiad of the fount to thank, Nor thought what giant stream might there be nurst, Cradled upon its green and mossy bank, Till from their bed the swelling sources burst, And to earths mightiest river gathering, flow To greet noons sun above,the Mexic gulf below! Thy borders forests and thy stream an ocean, Darkfathomlessa torrent in its course; Whirling and boiling, ceaseless in commotion, And its own banks corroding by its force; Image of those who live by deep emotion, Victims of love, hope, anger, fear, remorse, And all the fearful passions that consume Mans heart between the cradle and the tomb. Bruce of this the Western Nilechar 13 to 42 of bkgnd field id 1CardBruce . . . Nilechar 318 to 333 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 936814 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false12)s)of this the Western Nile: At travellers vanity how woodsmen smile! At thy true sources the red Indian drank, Ay, and the weary hunter quenched his thirst, Nor paused the Naiad of the fount to thank, Nor thought what giant stream might there be nurst, Cradled upon its green and mossy bank, Till from their bed the swelling sources burst, And to earths mightiest river gathering, flow To greet noons sun above,the Mexic gulf below! Thy borders forests and thy stream an ocean, Darkfathomlessa torrent in its course; Whirling and boiling, ceaseless in commotion, And its own banks corroding by its force; Image of those who live by deep emotion, Victims of love, hope, anger, fear, remorse, And all the fearful passions that consume Mans heart between the cradle and the tomb. 12)s)CARD@5 xs9189[Fitz-Greene HalleckE.+V,lVmVVdVeFor Greece and fame, for faith and heaven, By Europes craven chivalry. Youll ask if yet the Percy lives In the armed pomp of feudal state? The present representatives Of Hotspur and his gentle Kate, Are some half dozen serving men, In the drab coat of William Penn; A chambermaid, whose lip and eye, And cheek, and brown hair, bright and curling, Spoke Natures aristocracy; And one, half groom half Seneschal, Who bowed me through court, bower, and hall, From donjon keep to turret wall, For ten-and-sixpence sterling. 13lVmVVdVeFor Greece and fame, for faith and heaven, By Europes craven chivalry. Youll ask if yet the Percy lives In the armed pomp of feudal state? The present representatives Of Hotspur and his gentle Kate, Are some half dozen serving men, In the drab coat of William Penn; A chambermaid, whose lip and eye, And cheek, and brown hair, bright and curling, Spoke Natures aristocracy; And one, half groom half Seneschal, Who bowed me through court, bower, and hall, From donjon keep to turret wall, For ten-and-sixpence sterling. 13CARD@0 s9121[John Pierpontk"9VHrSUVWkAnd sweeter flowers on holier mountains blow. I love to breathe where Gilead sheds her balm; I love to walk on Jordans banks of palm; I love to wet my foot in Hermons dews; I love the promptings of Isaiahs muse: In Carmels holy grots, Ill court repose, And deck my mossy couch, with Sharons deathless rose. lines 5596 Now, he recalls the lamentable wail, That piercd the shades of Ramas palmy vale When Murder struck, thrond on an infants bier, A note, for Satans, and for Herods ear. Now, on a bank, oerhung with waving wood, Whose falling leaves flit oer Ohios flood, The pilgrim stands; and oer his memory rushes The mingled tide of tears, and blood, that gushes Along the valleys, where his childhood strayd, And round the temples, where his fathers prayd. How fondly then, from all but Hope exild, lamentable wailchar 364 to 378 of bkgnd field id 1Cardlamentablechar 292 to 301 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935992 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseThat piercd the shades of Ramas palmy valechar 381 to 424 of bkgnd field id 1Card . . . valechar 302 to 312 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935992 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falselamentable wail, That piercd the shades of Ramas palmy valechar 364 to 424 of bkgnd field id 1Cardlamentable . . . valechar 292 to 312 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 935992 of stack "really real"false9e wa< `XCMD0|And sweeter flowers on holier mountains blow. I love to breathe where Gilead sheds her balm; I love to walk on Jordans banks of palm; I love to wet my foot in Hermons dews; I love the promptings of Isaiahs muse: In Carmels holy grots, Ill court repose, And deck my mossy couch, with Sharons deathless rose. lines 5596 Now, he recalls the lamentable wail, That piercd the shades of Ramas palmy vale When Murder struck, thrond on an infants bier, A note, for Satans, and for Herods ear. Now, on a bank, oerhung with waving wood, Whose falling leaves flit oer Ohios flood, The pilgrim stands; and oer his memory rushes The mingled tide of tears, and bloo`CARD@5 s9199[Fitz-Greene Halleckk.V/VV=V>VqqqqqqqqV`VaVAs Rob Roys tartan for the Highland heather, Or forest green for Englands Robin Hood. Is strength a monarchs merit, like a whalers? Thou art as tall, as sinewy, and as strong As earths first kingsthe Argos gallant sailors, Heroes in history and gods in song. Is beauty?Thine has with thy youth departed; But the love-legends of thy manhoods years, And she who perished, young and broken-hearted, Arebut I rhyme for smiles and not for tears. Is eloquence?Her spell is thine that reaches The heart, and makes the wisest head its sport; And theres one rare, strange virtue in thy speeches, The secret of their mastery,they are short. The monarch mind, the mystery of commanding, The birth-hour gift, the art Napoleon, 13$.s$.V>VqqqqqqqqV`VaVAs Rob Roys tartan for the Highland heather, Or forest green for Englands Robin Hood. Is strength a monarchs merit, like a whalers? Thou art as tall, as sinewy, and as strong As earths first kingsthe Argos gallant sailors, Heroes in history and gods in song. Is beauty?Thine has with thy youth departed; But the love-legends of thy manhoods years, And she who perished, young and broken-hearted, Arebut I rhyme for smiles and not for tears. Is eloquence?Her spell is thine that reaches The heart, and makes the wisest head its sport; And theres one rare, strange virtue in thy speeches, The secret of their mastery,they are short. The monarch mind, the mystery of commanding, The birth-hour gift, the art Napoleon, 13$.s$.CARD@W s9706[Henry Wadsworth Longfellow'&KVLV&V'VI was a Viking old! My deeds, though manifold, No Skald in song has told, No Saga taught thee! Take heed, that in thy verse Thou dost the tale rehearse, Else dread a dead mans curse! For this I sought thee. Far in the Northern Land, By the wild Baltics strand, I, with my childish hand, Tamed the ger-falcon; And, with my skates fast-bound, Skimmed the half-frozen Sound, That the poor whimpering hound Trembled to walk on. Oft to his frozen lair Tracked I the grisly bear, While from my path the hare '&KVLV&V'VI was a Viking old! My deeds, though manifold, No Skald in song has told, No Saga taught thee! Take heed, that in thy verse Thou dost the tale rehearse, Else dread a dead mans curse! For this I sought thee. Far in the Northern Land, By the wild Baltics strand, I, with my childish hand, Tamed the ger-falcon; And, with my skates fast-bound, Skimmed the half-frozen Sound, That the poor whimpering hound Trembled to walk on. Oft to his frozen lair Tracked I the grisly bear, While from my path the hare 34Ds904CARDRy@.f s982[James Kirke Paulding[Vfr}To find if this same headless, limbless thing, A worthless godhead was, or worthless king. Book III, lines 499526 5ind if this same headless, limbless thing, A worthless godhead was, or worthless king. Book III, lines 499526 5CARD@1 Xs9136[Richard Henry Dana%)Q*6Q7cQdQQQQQQFQGuQvQQQV  9Q:gQhnQoQQQQQDQEVQShone on the earth, midst thaw and steam, camst forth From rocky nook, or wood, thy priestly cell, To speak of comfort unto lonely man Didst say to him,though seemingly alone Midst wastes and snows, and silent, lifeless trees, Or the more silent groundthat t was not death, But natures sleep and rest, her kind repair; That Thou, albeit unseen, didst bear with him The winters night, and, patient of the day, And cheerd by hope, (instinct divine in Thee,) Waitedst return of summer. More Thou saidst, Thou Priest of Nature, Priest of God, to man! Thou spokst of Faith, (than instinct no less sure,) Of Spirits near him, though he saw them not: Thou badst him ope his intellectual eye, And see his solitude all populous: Thou showdst him Paradise, and deathless flowers; And didst him pray to listen to the flow Of living waters. 116Q7`CARD+@1 s9138[Richard Henry Danas>/30435839B3CG3HK3LT3UBut thou art restless; and thy once keen eye Is dull and sightless now. New blooming boughs, Needlessly kind, have spread a tent for thee. Thy mate is calling to the white, piled clouds, And asks for thee. No answer give they back. As I look up to their bright angel faces, Intelligent and capable of voice They seem to me. Their silence to my soul Comes ominous. The same to thee, doomd bird, Silence or sound. For thee there is no sound, No silence.Near thee stands the shadow, Death; And now he slowly draws his sable veil Over thine eyes. Thy senses soft he lulls Into unconscious slumbers. The airy call Thoult hear no longer. Neath sun-lighted clouds, With beating wing, or steady poise aslant, Thoult sail no more. Around thy trembling claws Droop thy wings parting feathers. Spasms of death Are on thee. s>/30435839B3CG3HK3LT3UBut thou art restless; and thy once keen eye Is dull and sightless now. New blooming boughs, Needlessly kind, have spread a tent for thee. Thy mate is calling to the white, piled clouds, And asks for thee. No answer give they back. As I look up to their bright angel faces, Intelligent and capable of voice They seem to me. Their silence to my soul Comes ominous. The same to thee, doomd bird, Silence or sound. For thee there is no sound, No silence.Near thee stands the shadow, Death; And now he slowly draws his sable veil Over thine eyes. Thy senses soft he lulls Into unconscious slumbers. The airy call Thoult hear no longer. Neath sun-lighted clouds, With beating wing, or steady poise aslant, Thoult sail no more. Around thy trembling claws Droop thy wings parting feathers. Spasms of death Are on thee. 11@CARD@2I s9146[Richard Henry DanaV> V rCaEr{a}rarV    Daybreak The Pilgrim they laid in a large upper chamber, whose window opened towards the sun rising: the name of the chamber was Peace; where he slept till break of day, and then he awoke and sang. THE PILGRIMS PROGRESS. I. Now, brighter than the host that all night long, In fiery armour, up the heavens high Stood watch, thou comst to wait the mornings song, Thou comst to tell me day again is nigh. Star of the dawning, cheerful is thine eye; And yet in the broad day it must grow dim. Thou seemst to look on me, as asking why My mourning eyes with silent tears do swim; Thou bidst me turn to God, and seek my rest in Him. Ȁ6r V rCaEr{a}rarVDaybreak The Pilgrim they laid in a large upper chamber, whose window opened towards the sun rising: the name of the chamber was Peace; where he slept till break of day, and then he awoke and sang. THE PILGRIMS PROGRESS. I. Now, brighter than the host that all night long, In fiery armour, up the heavens high Stood watch, thou comst to wait the mornings song, Thou comst to tell me day again is nigh. Star of the dawning, cheerful is thine eye; And yet in the broad day it must grow dim. Thou seemst to look on me, as asking why My mourning eyes with silent tears do swim; Thou bidst me turn to God, and seek my rest in Him. 11 my rest in Him. CARD4@2I s9147[Richard Henry DanaZ  q qqqq 'q(+q,1q27q8 II. Canst thou grow sad, thou sayst, as earth grows bright? And sigh, when little birds begin discourse In quick, low voices, eer the streaming light Pours on their nests, as sprung from days fresh source? With creatures innocent thou must perforce A sharer be, if that thine heart be pure. And holy hour like this, save sharp remorse, Of ills and pains of life must be the cure, And breathe in kindred calm, and teach thee to endure. III. I feel its calm. But theres a sombrous hue Along that eastern cloud of deep, dull red; Nor glitters yet the cold and heavy dew; And all the woods and hill-tops stand outspread With dusky lights, which warmth nor comfort shed. Stillsave the bird that scarcely lifts its song The vast world seems the tomb of all the dead The silent city emptied of its throng, And ended, all alike, grief, mirth, love, hate, and wrong. N q qqqq 'q(+q,1q27q8II. Canst thou grow sad, thou sayst, as earth grows bright? And sigh, when little birds begin discourse In quick, low voices, eer the streaming light Pours on their nests, as sprung from days fresh source? With creatures innocent thou must perforce A sharer be, if that thine heart be pure. And holy hour like this, save sharp remorse, Of ills and pains of life must be the cure, And breathe in kindred calm, and teach thee to endure. III. I feel its calm. But theres a sombrous hue Along that eastern cloud of deep, dull red; Nor glitters yet the cold and heavy dew; And all the woods and hill-tops stand outspread With dusky lights, which warmth nor comfort shed. Stillsave the bird that scarcely lifts its song The vast world seems the tomb of all the dead The silent city emptied of its throng, And ended, all alike, grief, mirth, love, hate, and wrong. 11CARDj@2I s9148[Richard Henry DanaK  IV. But wrong, and hate, and love, and grief, and mirth Will quicken soon; and hard, hot toil and strife, With headlong purpose, shake this sleeping earth With discord strange, and all that man calls life. With thousand scatterd beauties natures rife; And airs, and woods, and streams breathe harmonies: Man weds not these, but taketh art to wife; Nor binds his heart with soft and kindly ties: He, feverish, blinded, lives, and, feverish, sated, dies. V. And t is because man useth so amiss Her dearest blessings, Nature seemeth sad; Else why should she in such fresh hour as this Not lift the veil, in revelation glad, From her fair face?It is that man is mad! Then chide me not, clear star, that I repine, When nature grieves; nor deem this heart is bad. Thou lookst towards earth; but yet the heavens are thine; ?IV. But wrong, and hate, and love, and grief, and mirth Will quicken soon; and hard, hot toil and strife, With headlong purpose, shake this sleeping earth With discord strange, and all that man calls life. With thousand scatterd beauties natures rife; And airs, and woods, and streams breathe harmonies: Man weds not these, but taketh art to wife; Nor binds his heart with soft and kindly ties: He, feverish, blinded, lives, and, feverish, sated, dies. V. And t is because man useth so amiss Her dearest blessings, Nature seemeth sad; Else why should she in such fresh hour as this Not lift the veil, in revelation glad, From her fair face?It is that man is mad! Then chide me not, clear star, that I repine, When nature grieves; nor deem this heart is bad. Thou lookst towards earth; but yet the heavens are thine; 11hineCARD@2I "s9149[Richard Henry Dana4V6= ? While I to earth am bound:When will the heavens be mine? VI. If man would but his finer nature learn, And not in life fantastic lose the sense Of simpler things; could natures features stern Teach him be thoughtful; then, with soul intense, I should not yearn for God to take me hence, But bear my lot, albeit in spirit bowd, Remembering humbly why it is, and whence: But when I see cold man, of reason proud, My solitude is sadIm lonely in the crowd. VII. But not for this alone, the silent tear Steals to mine eyes, while looking on the morn, Nor for this solemn hour:fresh life is near, But all my joys!they died when newly born. Thousands will wake to joy; while I, forlorn, And like the stricken deer, with sickly eye 4V6While I to earth am bound:When will the heavens be mine? VI. If man would but his finer nature learn, And not in life fantastic lose the sense Of simpler things; could natures features stern Teach him be thoughtful; then, with soul intense, I should not yearn for God to take me hence, But bear my lot, albeit in spirit bowd, Remembering humbly why it is, and whence: But when I see cold man, of reason proud, My solitude is sadIm lonely in the crowd. VII. But not for this alone, the silent tear Steals to mine eyes, while looking on the morn, Nor for this solemn hour:fresh life is near, But all my joys!they died when newly born. Thousands will wake to joy; while I, forlorn, And like the stricken deer, with sickly eye 11  CARD@2I Rs9150[Richard Henry Dana& 3*V,3 5Shall see them pass. Breathe calmmy spirits torn; Ye holy thoughts,lift up my soul on high! Ye hopes of things unseen, the far-off world bring nigh. VIII. And when I grieve, O, rather let it be That Iwhom nature taught to sit with her On her proud mountains, by her rolling sea Who when the winds are up, with mighty stir Of woods and watersfeel the quickning spur To my strong spirit;who, as mine own child, Do love the flower, and in the ragged bur A beauty seethat I this mother mild Should leave,and go with care, and passions fierce and wild! IX. How suddenly that straight and glittering shaft, Shot thwart the earth!In crown of living fire Up comes the Day!As if they conscious quaft The sunny flood, hill, forest, city, spire 3*V,Shall see them pass. Breathe calmmy spirits torn; Ye holy thoughts,lift up my soul on high! Ye hopes of things unseen, the far-off world bring nigh. VIII. And when I grieve, O, rather let it be That Iwhom nature taught to sit with her On her proud mountains, by her rolling sea Who when the winds are up, with mighty stir Of woods and watersfeel the quickning spur To my strong spirit;who, as mine own child, Do love the flower, and in the ragged bur A beauty seethat I this mother mild Should leave,and go with care, and passions fierce and wild! IX. How suddenly that straight and glittering shaft, Shot thwart the earth!In crown of living fire Up comes the Day!As if they conscious quaft The sunny flood, hill, forest, city, spire 11CARD@2I `s9151[Richard Henry Dana.&  > VLaugh in the wakening light.Go, vain desire! The dusky lights have gone; go thou thy way! And pining discontent, like them, expire! Be calld my chamber, PEACE, when ends the day; And let me with the dawn, like PILGRIM, sing and pray! The Husbands and Wifes Grave Husband and wife! No converse now ye hold, As once ye did in your young day of love, On its alarms, its anxious hours, delays, Its silent meditations, its glad hopes, Its fears, impatience, quiet sympathies; Nor do ye speak of joy assured, and bliss Full, certain, and possessd. Domestic cares Call you not now together. Earnest talk On what your children may be, moves you not. Ye lie in silence, and an awful silence; T is not like that in which ye rested once Most happysilence eloquent, when heart 11plight.Go, vain desire! The dusky lights have gone; go thou thy way! And pining discontent, like them, expire! Be calld my chamber, PEACE, when ends the day; And let me with the dawn, like PILGRIM, sing and pray! The Husbands and Wifes Grave Husband and wife! No converse now ye hold, As once ye did in your young day of love, On its alarms, its anxious hours, delays, Its silent meditations, its glad hopes, Its fears, impatience, quiet sympathies; Nor do ye speak of joy assured, and bliss Full, certain, and possessd. Domestic cares Call you not now together. Earnest talk On what your children may be, moves you not. Ye lie in silence, and an awful silence; T is not like that in which ye rested once Most happysilence eloquent, when heart 11pCARD!@2I js9155[Richard Henry Dana/V0All time, all bounds, the limitless expanse, As one vast mystic instrument, are touchd By an unseen, living Hand, and conscious chords Quiver with joy in this great jubilee. The dying hear it; and as sounds of earth Grow dull and distant, wake their passing souls To mingle in this heavenly harmony. Why is it that I linger round this tomb? What holds it? Dust that cumberd those I mourn. They shook it off, and laid aside earths robes, And put on those of light. Theyre gone to dwell In lovetheir Gods and angels. Mutual love That bound them here, no longer needs a speech For full communion; nor sensations strong, Within the breast, their prison, strive in vain To be set free, and meet their kind in joy. Changed to celestials, thoughts that rise in each, By natures new, impart themselves though silent. Each quickning sense, each throb of holy love, Affections sanctified, and the full glow /V0All time, all bounds, the limitless expanse, As one vast mystic instrument, are touchd By an unseen, living Hand, and conscious chords Quiver with joy in this great jubilee. The dying hear it; and as sounds of earth Grow dull and distant, wake their passing souls To mingle in this heavenly harmony. Why is it that I linger round this tomb? What holds it? Dust that cumberd those I mourn. They shook it off, and laid aside earths robes, And put on those of light. Theyre gone to dwell In lovetheir Gods and angels. Mutual love That bound them here, no longer needs a speech For full communion; nor sensations strong, Within the breast, their prison, strive in vain To be set free, and meet their kind in joy. Changed to celestials, thoughts that rise in each, By natures new, impart themselves though silent. Each quickning sense, each throb of holy love, Affections sanctified, and the full glow 11$ts$CARDș@3 s9166[Richard Henry WildeـGVRrjmOblivion, memory, and fancy blend As on the partial pages of a friend. Canto III, stanzas 5051 Mount Auburn! loveliest city of the dead, No cemetery on earth with thee may vie In native beauty. Wheresoeer we tread, Wood, water, rocks, turf, flowers, salute the eye: Afar the oceans bosom is outspread, And naught distracts our meditations high And holy reveries. Earth and air and wave Are tranquil all, as mans best home, the Grave! What obelisk arises on yon hill, That overlooks a stately town and bay? It is a scene to gaze on! Look thy fill! Yet temples, islands, shipping, what are they? All charms of art and nature, taste and skill, Fail to withdraw us from that column gray: Mount Auburn! loveliest city of the deadchar 110 to 149 of bkgnd field id 1CardMount Auburn! . . . deadchar 196 to 219 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 936607 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false12Wi6`s6Pon, memory, and fancy blend As on the partial pages of a friend. Canto III, stanzas 5051 Mount Auburn! loveliest city of the dead, No cemetery on earth with thee may vie In native beauty. Wheresoeer we tread, Wood, water, rocks, turf, flowers, salute the eye: Afar the oceans bosom is outspread, And naught distracts our meditations high And holy reveries. Earth and air and wave Are tranquil all, as mans best home, the Grave! What obelisk arises on yon hill, That overlooks a stately town and bay? It is a scene to gaze on! Look thy fill! Yet temples, islands, shipping, what are they? All charms of art and nature, taste and skill, Fail to withdraw us from that column gray: 12Wi6`s6P CARD7@3 s9157[Richard Henry Dana^ VVV&V( VVVV No close, Thou kindly unto my dark mind Hast sent a sacred light, and that away From this green hillock, whither I had come In sorrow, Thou art leading me in joy. The Chanting Cherubs I. Whence came ye, Cherubs? from the moon? Or from a shining star? Ye, sure, are sent, a blessed boon, From kinder worlds afar; For while I look, my heart is all delight: Earth has no creatures half so pure and bright. II. From moon, nor star, we hither flew; The moon doth wane away; The starsthey pale at morning dew: Were children of the day; The Chanting Cherubschar 166 to 185 of bkgnd field id 1Card The Chanting Cherubschar 434 to 454 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 936275 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falserNVVV&V(VVVV No close, Thou kindly unto my dark mind Hast sent a sacred light, and that away From this green hillock, whither I had come In sorrow, Thou art leading me in joy. The Chanting Cherubs I. Whence came ye, Cherubs? from the moon? Or from a shining star? Ye, sure, are sent, a blessed boon, From kinder worlds afar; For while I look, my heart is all delight: Earth has no creatures half so pure and bright. II. From moon, nor star, we hither flew; The moon doth wane away; The starsthey pale at morning dew: Were children of the day; 11 day; CARDV@g6 zs9943[John Greenleaf Whittier>VZV[Parcel and part of all, I keep the festival, Fore-reach the good to be, And share the victory. I feel the earth move sunward, I join the great march onward, And take, by faith, while living, My freehold of thanksgiving. Burning Drift-Wood Before my drift-wood fire I sit, And see, with every waif I burn, Old dreams and fancies coloring it, And follys unlaid ghosts return. rVZV[Parcel and part of all, I keep the festival, Fore-reach the good to be, And share the victory. I feel the earth move sunward, I join the great march onward, And take, by faith, while living, My freehold of thanksgiving. Burning Drift-Wood Before my drift-wood fire I sit, And see, with every waif I burn, Old dreams and fancies coloring it, And follys unlaid ghosts return. 30CARDa@3 ^s9163[Richard Henry Wilde+6O RTV_ruQQQQThough unexhausted the delightful theme, From its seductive loveliness I flee; Leaving unsung full many a crystal stream, Of most deceptive depth and purity, Saint Juans orange-groves,Domingas smiles, Smyrna,Lake George, and all his fairy isles. Thy thousand silver lakes and shooting stars, Thy boundless woods and ever-blooming vales, Thy old invasions and religious wars, Thine Indian legends and romantic tales, Thine insurrections and domestic jars, Thy nameless flowers and voluptuous gales, All that will win some deathless poets rhyme, I leave,bequeathing thee and them to TIME! Canto I, stanzas 5256 Change blots out change,their very memory dies, Yet dim traditions of extinguished years Over oblivions gloomy gulf arise, 12V_ruQQQQThough unexhausted the delightful theme, From its seductive loveliness I flee; Leaving unsung full many a crystal stream, Of most deceptive depth and purity, Saint Juans orange-groves,Domingas smiles, Smyrna,Lake George, and all his fairy isles. Thy thousand silver lakes and shooting stars, Thy boundless woods and ever-blooming vales, Thy old invasions and religious wars, Thine Indian legends and romantic tales, Thine insurrections and domestic jars, Thy nameless flowers and voluptuous gales, All that will win some deathless poets rhyme, I leave,bequeathing thee and them to TIME! Canto I, stanzas 5256 Change blots out change,their very memory dies, Yet dim traditions of extinguished years Over oblivions gloomy gulf arise, 12CARD"@3 s9164[Richard Henry Wilde0Q1ZQ[QQ QQ Q ,Q-QQRzQ{QQQQQA skys first rainbow on the floods last tears: Glimpses of old creations greet our eyes, Lost Pleiads symphonies salute our ears, With some Hesperian or Atlantic rhyme, Shedding faint twilight on the depths of TIME! This world now new was once perhaps the old, Oldest of all not utterly forgot, For giant Mammoths a luxuriant fold, Monsters that were of earth, and now are not, Sauri, that both on land and ocean rolled, Leviathan, Hydrargos, Behemot, Titanic tortoises, Cyclopean trees, All that Geology obscurely sees. Enough!too muchof this!t is but a dream That might provoke the pity of the wise, And cynics sneer. Return we to our theme, Our countrys plains, lakes, rivers, woods, and skies; Her mountain-cataract and ocean-stream, And Natures solitude, so dear to eyes 12pnQQ Q ,Q-QQRzQ{QQQQQA skys first rainbow on the floods last tears: Glimpses of old creations greet our eyes, Lost Pleiads symphonies salute our ears, With some Hesperian or Atlantic rhyme, Shedding faint twilight on the depths of TIME! This world now new was once perhaps the old, Oldest of all not utterly forgot, For giant Mammoths a luxuriant fold, Monsters that were of earth, and now are not, Sauri, that both on land and ocean rolled, Leviathan, Hydrargos, Behemot, Titanic tortoises, Cyclopean trees, All that Geology obscurely sees. Enough!too muchof this!t is but a dream That might provoke the pity of the wise, And cynics sneer. Return we to our theme, Our countrys plains, lakes, rivers, woods, and skies; Her mountain-cataract and ocean-stream, And Natures solitude, so dear to eyes 12pnCARD2@4: `s9172[Richard Henry Wilde.The Demosthenian laurel briefly wore: To what Convention doth he thunder now? What realms of chaos do thy steps explore? What empires ruinedor to ruinshare Thine eloquence and his,if eloquence be there? The earth we trample answers, Dust to dust! With all before the flood, and since the fall, Evil and good, ye sleep,just and unjust, One mothers kindred breast receives us all: For all beyond, who shall avouch mans trust? And who refute? What bigot dare to call For judgment on his fellow-mortals head? What fool rush in where angels dare not tread? Marvels, Ohio, on thy soil abound, Fragments it puzzles Science to explain, Of mammoth, mastodon, and Indian mound, Temple, tomb, fortress?still discussed in vain! Who may the history of those bones expound? Where do the annals of that age remain? 12efly wore: To what Convention doth he thunder now? What realms of chaos do thy steps explore? What empires ruinedor to ruinshare Thine eloquence and his,if eloquence be there? The earth we trample answers, Dust to dust! With all before the flood, and since the fall, Evil and good, ye sleep,just and unjust, One mothers kindred breast receives us all: For all beyond, who shall avouch mans trust? And who refute? What bigot dare to call For judgment on his fellow-mortals head? What fool rush in where angels dare not tread? Marvels, Ohio, on thy soil abound, Fragments it puzzles Science to explain, Of mammoth, mastodon, and Indian mound, Temple, tomb, fortress?still discussed in vain! Who may the history of those bones expound? Where do the annals of that age remain? 12CARD@4: (s9174[Richard Henry Wilde+rq q qqq&q',q-? FPrRSV^ru17rWhence came the workmen? Who destroyed them? Why? The Echo of OBLIVION answers,I! Canto IV, stanzas 8187 Across the Prairies silent waste I stray, A fertile, verdant, woodless, boundless plain; Shadeless it lies beneath the glare of day, But gentle breezes sweep the grassy main, Over whose surface, as they rest or play, The waving billows sink or rise again; While some far distant lonely hut or tree Looms like a solitary sail at sea! What is yon rude and overhanging steep That frowns on Illinois unmurmuring tide, Fortress, or cliff, or Pharos of the deep? Stern Natures monument of savage pride, The Siouxs tower of hunger!Pisas keep, Amid whose horrors Ugolino died, Pharoschar 562 to 567 of bkgnd field id 1CardPharoschar 542 to 547 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 937157 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseSiouxs tower of hungerchar 627 to 649 of bkgnd field id 1CardSiouxs tower of hungerchar 662 to 684 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 937157 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseUgolino died,char 684 to 696 of bkgnd field id 1CardUgolinochar 16 to 23 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 937445 of stack "really real"false12nnqq&q',q-PrRSV^ru17rWhence came the workmen? Who destroyed them? Why? The Echo of OBLIVION answers,I! Canto IV, stanzas 8187 Across the Prairies silent waste I stray, A fertile, verdant, woodless, boundless plain; Shadeless it lies beneath the glare of day, But gentle breezes sweep the grassy main, Over whose surface, as they rest or play, The waving billows sink or rise again; While some far distant lonely hut or tree Looms like a solitary sail at sea! What is yon rude and overhanging steep That frowns on Illinois unmurmuring tide, Fortress, or cliff, or Pharos of the deep? Stern Natures monument of savage pride, The Siouxs tower of hunger!Pisas keep, Amid whose horrors Ugolino died, 12n `CARDu@4: s9178[Richard Henry Wilde0&No foe they pardon, and no friend betray; Admiring nothing,men without a tear, Strangers to falsehood, pity, mirth, and fear. Here Chastellux and Chateaubriand found Matter to point a moral or a tale; This was Atalas consecrated ground, Ample the canvasif the colors fail. Yet should a trump of more exalted sound The Christian genius and the Martyr hail: To the fallen monarchs of the vainly free, Faithful among the faithless, only he! Behold the sinking mountain! year by year, Lower and lower still, the boatman thinks, Its rudely castellated cliffs appear, And he is sure that in the stream it sinks. Gazing in wonder, not unmixed with fear To see how fast its rocky basis shrinks, He murmurs to himself in lower tone, What does the Devil do with all this stone? ~Chastelluxchar 135 to 144 of bkgnd field id 1CardChastelluxchar 474 to 483 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 937717 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseAtalaschar 214 to 220 of bkgnd field id 1CardAtalaschar 679 to 685 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 937717 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseFaithful among the faithless,char 405 to 435 of bkgnd field id 1Card Faithful...faithlesschar 9 to 35 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 937803 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falsethe sinking mountainchar 454 to 473 of bkgnd field id 1Cardthe sinking mountainchar 166 to 185 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 937803 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false12No foe they pardon, and no friend betray; Admiring nothing,men without a tear, Strangers to falsehood, pity, mirth, and fear. Here Chastellux and Chateaubriand found Matter to point a moral or a tale; This was Atalas consecrated ground, Ample the canvasif the colors fail. Yet should a trump of more exalted sound The Christian genius and the Martyr hail: To the fallen monarchs of the vainly free, Faithful among the faithless, only he! Behold the sinking mountain! year by year, Lower and lower still, the boatman thinks, Its rudely castellated cliffs appear, And he is sure that in the stream it sinks. Gazing in wonder, not unmixed with fear To see how fast its rocky basis shrinks, He murmurs to himself in lower tone, What does the Devil do with all this stone? 12 CARDގ@5 s9187[Fitz-Greene HalleckNrVsVWVXV V /And beasts and borderers throng the way; Oxen, and bleating lambs in lots, Northumbrian boors, and plaided Scots; Men in the coal and cattle line, From Teviots bard and hero land, From royal Berwicks beach of sand, From Wooller, Morpeth, Hexham, and Newcastle-upon-Tyne. These are not the romantic times So beautiful in Spencers rhymes, So dazzling to the dreaming boy: Ours are the days of fact, not fable; Of Knights, but not of the Round Table; Of Bailie Jarvie, not Rob Roy: Tis what our President, Munro, Has called the era of good feeling: The Highlander, the bitterest foe To modern laws, has felt their blow, Consented to be taxed, and vote, And put on pantaloons and coat, royal Berwickchar 188 to 200 of bkgnd field id 1Cardroyal Berwickchar 275 to 287 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 938667 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseBailie Jarvie, not Rob Roychar 460 to 485 of bkgnd field id 1CardBailie Jarvie . . . Rob Roychar 633 to 659 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 938667 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseMunrochar 515 to 519 of bkgnd field id 1CardMunrochar 851 to 855 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 938667 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falsethe era of good feeling:char 534 to 559 of bkgnd field id 1Card the era...feelingchar 9 to 32 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 938831 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false13$wts$wdXV V /And beasts and borderers throng the way; Oxen, and bleating lambs in lots, Northumbrian boors, and plaided Scots; Men in the coal and cattle line, From Teviots bard and hero land, From royal Berwicks beach of sand, From Wooller, Morpeth, Hexham, and Newcastle-upon-Tyne. These are not the romantic times So beautiful in Spencers rhymes, So dazzling to the dreaming boy: Ours are the days of fact, not fable; Of Knights, but not of the Round Table; Of Bailie Jarvie, not Rob Roy: Tis what our President, Munro, Has called the era of good feeling: The Highlander, the bitterest foe To modern laws, has felt their blow, Consented to be taxed, and vote, And put on pantaloons and coat, 13$wts$wd CARDڗ@4: s9183[Fitz-Greene Halleck7 34V5WX{|V}V()KLVMgiVV23V4Z[e| Alnwick Castle Home of the Percys high-born race, Home of their beautiful and brave, Alike their birth and burial place, Their cradle, and their grave! Still sternly oer the Castle gate Their houses Lion stands in state, As in his proud departed hours; And warriors frown in stone on high, And feudal banners flout the sky Above his princely towers. A gentle hill its side inclines, Lovely in Englands fadeless green, To meet the quiet stream which winds Through this romantic scene As silently and sweetly still, As when, at evening, on that hill, While summers wind blew soft and low, Seated by gallant Hotspurs side, 4Alnwick Castlechar 1 to 14 of bkgnd field id 1CardAlnwick Castlechar 9 to 22 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 938222 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falsegallant Hotspurs side,char 614 to 636 of bkgnd field id 1Cardgallant Hotspurchar 95 to 109 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 938222 of stack "really real"false134V5WX{|V}V()KLVMgiVV23V4Z[e|Alnwick Castle Home of the Percys high-born race, Home of their beautiful and brave, Alike their birth and burial place, Their cradle, and their grave! Still sternly oer the Castle gate Their houses Lion stands in state, As in his proud departed hours; And warriors frown in stone on high, And feudal banners flout the sky Above his princely towers. A gentle hill its side inclines, Lovely in Englands fadeless green, To meet the quiet stream which winds Through this romantic scene As silently and sweetly still, As when, at evening, on that hill, While summers wind blew soft and low, Seated by gallant Hotspurs side, 13CARDL@5 s9186[Fitz-Greene Halleck ^'V(fVgVV 1dsVtV{V(V)First, in her twilight slumbers, heard The Normans curfew bell. I wandered through the lofty halls Trod by the Percys of old fame, And traced upon the chapel walls Each high, heroic name, From him who once his standard set Where now, oer mosque and minaret, Glitter the Sultans crescent moons; To him who, when a younger son, Fought for King George at Lexington, A Major of Dragoons. * * * * That last half stanzait has dashed From my warm lip the sparkling cup; The light that oer my eye-beam flashed, The power that bore my spirit up Above this bank-note worldis gone; And Alnwicks but a market town, And this, alas! its market day, him who once his standard setchar 199 to 227 of bkgnd field id 1Cardhim . . . standard setchar 771 to 792 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 938222 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falsehim who, when a younger son,char 306 to 333 of bkgnd field id 1Cardhimchar 13 to 15 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 938667 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseFought for King Georgechar 335 to 356 of bkgnd field id 1Card . . . King Georgechar 16 to 33 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 938667 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falsehim who, when a younger son, Fought for King Georgechar 306 to 356 of bkgnd field id 1Cardhim . . . King Georgechar 13 to 33 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 938667 of stack "really real"false133Re(fVgVV 1MNdsVtV{V(V)First, in her twilight slumbers, heard The Normans curfew bell. I wandered through the lofty halls Trod by the Percys of old fame, And traced upon the chapel walls Each high, heroic name, From him who once his standard set Where now, oer mosque and minaret, Glitter the Sultans crescent moons; To him who, when a younger son, Fought for King George at Lexington, A Major of Dragoons. * * * * That last half stanzait has dashed From my warm lip the sparkling cup; The ligp; The lig`CARDWa@K s9529[Ralph Waldo Emerson What boots thy zeal, O glowing friend, That would indignant rend The northland from the south? Wherefore? to what good end? Boston Bay and Bunker Hill Would serve things still; Things are of the snake. The horseman serves the horse, The neatherd serves the neat, The merchant serves the purse, The eater serves his meat; Tis the day of the chattel, Web to weave, and corn to grind, Things are in the saddle, And ride mankind. There are two laws discrete, Not reconciled, 29g friend, That would indignant rend The northland from the south? Wherefore? to what good end? Boston Bay and Bunker Hill Would serve things still; Things are of the snake. The horseman serves the horse, The neatherd serves the neat, The merchant serves the purse, The eater serves his meat; Tis the day of the chattel, Web to weave, and corn to grind, Things are in the saddle, And ride mankind. There are two laws discrete, Not reconciled, 29CARD u@8 s9232[William Cullen BryantIn their last sleepthe dead reign there alone. So shalt thou restand what if thou shalt fall Unheeded by the livingand no friend Take note of thy departure? All that breathe Will share thy destiny. The gay will laugh When thou art gone, the solemn brood of care Plod on, and each one as before will chase His favorite phantom; yet all these shall leave Their mirth and their employments, and shall come, And make their bed with thee. As the long train Of ages glide away, the sons of men, The youth in lifes green spring, and he who goes In the full strength of years, matron, and maid, And the sweet babe, and the gray-headed man, Shall one by one be gathered to thy side, By those, who in their turn shall follow them. So live, that when thy summons comes to join The innumerable caravan, that moves To that mysterious realm, where each shall take His chamber in the silent halls of death, Thou go not, like the quarry-slave at night, 18he dead reign there alone. So shalt thou restand what if thou shalt fall Unheeded by the livingand no friend Take note of thy departure? All that breathe Will share thy destiny. The gay will laugh When thou art gone, the solemn brood of care Plod on, and each one as before will chase His favorite phantom; yet all these shall leave Their mirth and their employments, and shall come, And make their bed with thee. As the long train Of ages glide away, the sons of men, The youth in lifes green spring, and he who goes In the full strength of years, matron, and maid, And the sweet babe, and the gray-headed man, Shall one by one be gathered to thy side, By those, who in their turn shall follow them. So live, that when thy summons comes to join The innumerable caravan, that moves To that mysterious realm, where each shall take His chamber in the silent halls of death, Thou go not, like the quarry-slave at night, 18CARDg@Cc s9409[Joseph Rodman Drake V Thy waves are old companions, I shall see A well-remembered form in each old tree, And hear a voice long loved in thy wild minstrelsy. 20 are old companions, I shall see A well-remembered form in each old tree, And hear a voice long loved in thy wild minstrelsy. 20`CARD@@ Xs9358[Maria Gowen Brooksb 4V5V  V sVt V0V1W [dLXVIII. With open mouths, as proud to show the bit, They raise their heads, and arch their necks(with eye As bright as if with meteor fire twere lit); And dart their barbed tongues, twixt fangs of ivory. LXIX. These, when the quick-advancing Sprites they saw Furl their swift wings, and tread with angel grace The smooth fair pavement, checkd their speed in awe, And glided far aside as if to give them space. LXX. Tahathyam, lighted with a pleasing pride, And in like guise, to meet the strangers bent His courteous steps; the while on either side Fierce Aishalat and Pshamayim went. LXXI. Bright Ramaur followed on, in order meet; Then Nahalcoul and Zotzaraven, best Ramaur followed on, in order meet;char 613 to 647 of bkgnd field id 1CardRamaurchar 84 to 90 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 939873 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseThen Nahalcoul and Zotzaraven, bestchar 650 to 684 of bkgnd field id 1Card . .char 91 to 94 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 939873 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseRamaur followed on, in order meet; Then Nahalcoul and Zotzaraven, bestchar 613 to 684 of bkgnd field id 1CardRamaurchar 84 to 90 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 939873 of stack "really real"false19l and Zotzaraven, be, be theV0V1dVLXVIII. With open mouths, as proud to show the bit, They raise their heads, and arch their necks(with eye As bright as if with meteor fire twere lit); And dart their barbed tongues, twixt fangs of ivory. LXIX. These, when the quick-advancing Sprites they saw Furl their swift wings, and tread with angel grace The smooth fair pavement, checkd their speed in awe, And glided far aside as if to give them space. LXX. Tahathyam, lighted with a pleasing pride, And in like guise, to meet the strangers bent His courteous steps; the while on either side Fierce Aishalat and Pshamayim went. LXXI. Bright Ramaur followed on, in order meet; TheCARDy@5 Ns9196[Fitz-Greene HalleckR>  r\V V@VAVVLVMVRed Jacket A Chief of the Indian Tribes, the Tuscaroras, on Looking at His Portrait by Weir Cooper, whose name is with his countrys woven, First in her files, her PIONEER of mind A wanderer now in other climes, has proven His love for the young land he left behind; And throned her in the senate hall of nations, Robed like the deluge rainbow, heaven-wrought, Magnificent as his own minds creations, And beautiful as its green world of thought: And faithful to the Act of Congress, quoted As law authority,it passed nem. con. He writes that we are, as ourselves have voted, The most enlightened people ever known. That all our week is happy as a Sunday In Paris, full of song and dance and laugh; 13 r\VV@VAVVLVMVRed Jacket A Chief of the Indian Tribes, the Tuscaroras, on Looking at His Portrait by Weir Cooper, whose name is with his countrys woven, First in her files, her PIONEER of mind A wanderer now in other climes, has proven His love for the young land he left behind; And throned her in the senate hall of nations, Robed like the deluge rainbow, heaven-wrought, Magnificent as his own minds creations, And beautiful as its green world of thought: And faithful to the Act of Congress, quoted As law authority,it passed nem. con. He writes that we are, as ourselves have voted, The most enlightened people ever known. That all our week is happy as a Sunday In Paris, full of song and dance and laugh; 13CARD@5 4s9197[Fitz-Greene HalleckF,V-VV/V0VV<V=VAnd that, from Orleans to the Bay of Fundy, Theres not a bailiff, or an epitaph. And furthermorein fifty years, or sooner, We shall export our poetry and wine; And our brave fleet, eight frigates and a schooner, Will sweep the seas from Zembla to the Line. If he were with me, King of Tuscarora! Gazing, as I, upon thy portrait now, In all its medalled, fringed, and beaded glory, Its eyes dark beauty, and its thoughtful brow Its brow, half martial, and half diplomatic, Its eye, upsoaring like an eagles wings; Well might he boast that we, the Democratic, Outrival Europe, even in our Kings! For thou wast monarch born. Traditions pages Tell not the planting of thy parent tree, 13V/V0VV<V=VAnd that, from Orleans to the Bay of Fundy, Theres not a bailiff, or an epitaph. And furthermorein fifty years, or sooner, We shall export our poetry and wine; And our brave fleet, eight frigates and a schooner, Will sweep the seas from Zembla to the Line. If he were with me, King of Tuscarora! Gazing, as I, upon thy portrait now, In all its medalled, fringed, and beaded glory, Its eyes dark beauty, and its thoughtful brow Its brow, half martial, and half diplomatic, Its eye, upsoaring like an eagles wings; Well might he boast that we, the Democratic, Outrival Europe, even in our Kings! For thou wast monarch born. Traditions pages Tell not the planting of thy parent tree, 13`CARDg@6 s9214[ John NealqVFor man is there sublimehe is a god! Great Natures master-piece! like him who trod The banks of paradise, and stood alone, The wonder of the skieserect upon his throne. Not like the airy god of moulded light, Just stepping from his chariot on the sight; Poising his beauties on a rolling cloud, With arm unstretched and bow-string twanging loud: And arrows singing as they pierce the air, With tinkling sandals and with golden hair; As if he paused upon his bounding way, And loosened his fierce arrowsbut in play: But like that angry god, in blazing light Bursting from space! and standing in his might: Revealed in his omnipotent array Apollo of the skies! and Deity of Day! In godlike wrath! piercing his myriad-foe With quenchless shafts, that lighten as they go: Not like that god, when up in air he springs, With brightening mantle, and with sunny wings, 16hs sublimehe is a god! Great Natures master-piece! like him who trod The banks of paradise, and stood alone, The wonder of the skieserect upon his throne. Not like the airy god of moulded light, Just stepping from his chariot on the sight; Poising his beauties on a rolling cloud, With arm unstretched and bow-string twanging loud: And arrows singing as they pierce the air, With tinkling sandals and with golden hair; As if he paused upon his bounding way, And loosened his fierce arrowsbut in play: But like that angry god, in blazing light Bursting from space! and standing in his might: Revealed in his omnipotent array Apollo of the skies! and Deity of Day! In godlike wrath! piercing his myriad-foe With quenchless shafts, that lighten as they go: Not like that god, when up in air he springs, With brightening mantle, and with sunny wings, 16hsCARD@6 s9215[ John NealyVzWhen heavenly musick murmurs from his strings A buoyant visionan embodied dream Of dainty Poesyand boyishly supreme. Not the thin spirit waked by young Desire, Gazing oer heaven, till her thoughts take fire: Panting and breathless in her hearts wild trance Bright, shapeless formsthe godlings of Romance. Not that Apollonot resembling him, Of silver brow, and womans nerveless limb: But man!all man!the monarch of the wild! Not the faint spiritthat corrupting smild On soft voluptuous Greecebut Natures child, Arrested in the chase! with piercing eye Fixd in its airy lightning on the sky, Where some red Bird is languid, eddying, drooping, Pierced by his arrows in her swiftest stooping. Thus springing to the skies!a boy will stand With arms uplifted, and unconscious hand Tracing its arrow in its loftiest flight And watch it kindling as it cleaves the light, 16#0$s# sick murmurs from his strings A buoyant visionan embodied dream Of dainty Poesyand boyishly supreme. Not the thin spirit waked by young Desire, Gazing oer heaven, till her thoughts take fire: Panting and breathless in her hearts wild trance Bright, shapeless formsthe godlings of Romance. Not that Apollonot resembling him, Of silver brow, and womans nerveless limb: But man!all man!the monarch of the wild! Not the faint spiritthat corrupting smild On soft voluptuous Greecebut Natures child, Arrested in the chase! with piercing eye Fixd in its airy lightning on the sky, Where some red Bird is languid, eddying, drooping, Pierced by his arrows in her swiftest stooping. Thus springing to the skies!a boy will stand With arms uplifted, and unconscious hand Tracing its arrow in its loftiest flight And watch it kindling as it cleaves the light, 16#0$s# CARD@7! s9218[ John Neal"V1q6JVXrnIs but a coloured fragrancefloatingbright; Where the sharp noteand whistling song is heard, Of many a golden beak, and sunny sparkling bird: There the tame honeysuckle will arise; The gaudy hot-house plant will spread its dyes, In flaunting boldness to the sunny skies: And sickly buds, as soon as blown, will shed Their fainting leaves oer their untimely bed; Unnatural violets in the blaze appear With hearts unwet by youthful Floras tear: And the loose poppy with its sleepy death, And flashy leaf: the warm and torpid breath Of lazy garlands, over crawling vines; The tawdry wreath that Fashion intertwines To deck her languid brow: the streamy gold, And purple flushing of the tulips fold; And velvet buds, of crimson, and of blue, Unchangeable and lifeless, as the hue Of Fashions gaudy wreaths, that neer were wet with dew. Canto II, lines 75180 16#s#nIs but a coloured fragrancefloatingbright; Where the sharp noteand whistling song is heard, Of many a golden beak, and sunny sparkling bird: There the tame honeysuckle will arise; The gaudy hot-house plant will spread its dyes, In flaunting boldness to the sunny skies: And sickly buds, as soon as blown, will shed Their fainting leaves oer their untimely bed; Unnatural violets in the blaze appear With hearts unwet by youthful Floras tear: And the loose poppy with its sleepy death, And flashy leaf: the warm and torpid breath Of lazy garlands, over crawling vines; The tawdry wreath that Fashion intertwines To deck her languid brow: the streamy gold, And purple flushing of the tulips fold; And velvet buds, of crimson, and of blue, Unchangeable and lifeless, as the hue Of Fashions gaudy wreaths, that neer were wet with dew. Canto II, lines 75180 16#s#CARD&@6 hs9201[Fitz-Greene Halleck5F,V-VVPVQVVaVbVThou art, in sober truth, the veriest devil That eer clinched fingers in a captives hair! That in thy breast there springs a poison fountain, Deadlier than that where bathes the Upas tree; And in thy wrath, a nursing cat-o-mountain Is calm as her babes sleep, compared with thee! And underneath that face, like summer oceans, Its lip as moveless, and its cheek as clear, Slumbers a whirlwind of the hearts emotions, Love, hatred, pride, hope, sorrow,all save fear. Lovefor thy land, as if she were thy daughter, Her pipe in peace, her tomahawk in wars; Hatredof missionaries and cold water; Pridein thy rifle-trophies and thy scars; Hopethat thy wrongs, may be by the Great Spirit, Remembered and revenged, when thou art gone; 13PVQVVaVbVThou art, in sober truth, the veriest devil That eer clinched fingers in a captives hair! That in thy breast there springs a poison fountain, Deadlier than that where bathes the Upas tree; And in thy wrath, a nursing cat-o-mountain Is calm as her babes sleep, compared with thee! And underneath that face, like summer oceans, Its lip as moveless, and its cheek as clear, Slumbers a whirlwind of the hearts emotions, Love, hatred, pride, hope, sorrow,all save fear. Lovefor thy land, as if she were thy daughter, Her pipe in peace, her tomahawk in wars; Hatredof missionaries and cold water; Pridein thy rifle-trophies and thy scars; Hopethat thy wrongs, may be by the Great Spirit, Remembered and revenged, when thou art gone; 13 CARD_@6 s9202[Fitz-Greene HalleckЀ^*V+_9cd>oq s VVCVD VDVESorrowthat none are left thee to inherit Thy name, thy fame, thy passions, and thy throne! from Connecticut I. They burnt their last witch in CONNECTICUT About a century and a half ago; They made a school-house of her forfeit hut, And gave a pitying sweet-briar leave to grow Above her thankless ashes; and they put A certified description of the show Between two weeping willows, craped with black, On the last page of that years almanac. II. Some warning and well-meant remarks were made Upon the subject by the weekly printers; The people murmured at the taxes laid To pay for jurymen and pitch-pine splinters, 13 013halle.MOV0,21044N 0 1792 3398 5528 7459 9348 10541 12497 13900 15856 17093 18866 20837read by Harold Bloomprs, VESorrowthat none are left thee to inherit Thy name, thy fame, thy passions, and thy throne! from Connecticut I. They burnt their last witch in CONNECTICUT About a century and a half ago; They made a school-house of her forfeit hut, And gave a pitying sweet-briar leave to grow Above her thankless ashes; and they put A certified description of the show Between two weeping willows, craped with black, On the last page of that years almanac. II. Some warning and well-meant remarks were made Upon the sumeant remarks were made Upon the su`CARDi@V@As if the ocean, in his gentlest swell, Stood still, with all his rounded billows fixed, And motionless for ever.Motionless? Nothey are all unchained again. The clouds Sweep over with their shadows, and, beneath, The surface rolls and fluctuates to the eye; Dark hollows seem to glide along and chase The sunny ridges. Breezes of the South! Who toss the golden and the flame-like flowers, And pass the prairie-hawk that, poised on high, Flaps his broad wings, yet moves notye have played Among the palms of Mexico and vines Of Texas, and have crisped the limpid brooks That from the fountains of Sonora glide Into the calm Pacifichave ye fanned A nobler or a lovelier scene than this? Man hath no part in all this glorious work: The hand that built the firmament hath heaved And smoothed these verdant swells, and sown their slopes With herbage, planted them with island groves, ~qqqqqqqqqqqqqq>V@As if the ocean, in his gentlest swell, Stood still, with all his rounded billows fixed, And motionless for ever.Motionless? Nothey are all unchained again. The clouds Sweep over with their shadows, and, beneath, The surface rolls and fluctuates to the eye; Dark hollows seem to glide along and chase The sunny ridges. Breezes of the South! Who toss the golden and the flame-like flowers, And pass the prairie-hawk that, poised on high, Flaps his broad wings, yet moves notye have played Among the palms of Mexico and vines Of Texas, and have crisped the limpid brooks That from the fountains of Sonora glide Into the calm Pacifichave ye fanned A nobler or a lovelier scene than this? Man hath no part in all this glorious work: The hand that built the firmament hath heaved And smoothed these verdant swells, and sown their slopes With herbage, planted them with island groves, 18CARDI@8 s9234[William Cullen BryantV7V8VVV|V~VVPVQVV Mong the deep-cloven fells that for ages had listened To the rush of the pebble-paved river between, Where the king-fisher screamed and gray precipice glistened, All breathless with awe have I gazed on the scene; Till I felt the dark power, oer my reveries stealing, From his throne in the depth of that stern solitude, And he breathed through my lips, in that tempest of feeling, Strains warm with his spirit, though artless and rude. Bright visions! I mixed with the world and ye faded; No longer your pure rural worshipper now; In the haunts your continual presence pervaded, Ye shrink from the signet of care on my brow. In the old mossy groves on the breast of the mountain, In deep lonely glens where the waters complain, By the shade of the rock, by the gush of the fountain, I seek your loved footsteps, but seek them in vain. 18#PsH#V|V~VVPVQVV Mong the deep-cloven fells that for ages had listened To the rush of the pebble-paved river between, Where the king-fisher screamed and gray precipice glistened, All breathless with awe have I gazed on the scene; Till I felt the dark power, oer my reveries stealing, From his throne in the depth of that stern solitude, And he breathed through my lips, in that tempest of feeling, Strains warm with his spirit, though artless and rude. Bright visions! I mixed with the world and ye faded; No longer your pure rural worshipper now; In the haunts your continual presence pervaded, Ye shrink from the signet of care on my brow. In the old mossy groves on the breast of the mountain, In deep lonely glens where the waters complain, By the shade of the rock, by the gush of the fountain, I seek your loved footsteps, but seek them in vain. #PsH#CARDn@= s9309[William Cullen BryantVAnd, nearer to the Rocky Mountains, sought A wider hunting-ground. The beaver builds No longer by these streams, but far away, On waters whose blue surface neer gave back The white mans faceamong Missouris springs, And pools whose issues swell the Oregan, He rears his little Venice. In these plains The bison feeds no more. Twice twenty leagues Beyond remotest smoke of hunters camp, Roams the majestic brute, in herds that shake The earth with thundering stepsyet here I meet His ancient footprints stamped beside the pool. Still this great solitude is quick with life. Myriads of insects, gaudy as the flowers They flutter over, gentle quadrupeds, And birds, that scarce have learned the fear of man, Are here, and sliding reptiles of the ground, Startlingly beautiful. The graceful deer Bounds to the wood at my approach. The bee, A more adventurous colonist than man, With whom he came across the eastern deep, VAnd, nearer to the Rocky Mountains, sought A wider hunting-ground. The beaver builds No longer by these streams, but far away, On waters whose blue surface neer gave back The white mans faceamong Missouris springs, And pools whose issues swell the Oregan, He rears his little Venice. In these plains The bison feeds no more. Twice twenty leagues Beyond remotest smoke of hunters camp, Roams the majestic brute, in herds that shake The earth with thundering stepsyet here I meet His ancient footprints stamped beside the pool. Still this great solitude is quick with life. Myriads of insects, gaudy as the flowers They flutter over, gentle quadrupeds, And birds, that scarce have learned the fear of man, Are here, and sliding reptiles of the ground, Startlingly beautiful. The graceful deer Bounds to the wood at my approach. The bee, A more adventurous colonist than man, With whom he came across the eastern deep, 18 s CARD@7! ps9216[ John NealHVOf worlds unseen but by the Indian sight; His robe and hair upon the wind at length, A creature of the hills!all grace and strength: All muscle and all flamehis eager eye Fixed on one spot as if he could descry His bleeding victim nestling in the sky. Not that Apollo!not the heavenly one, Voluptuous spirit of a setting sun, But thisthe offspring of young Solitude, Child of the holy spot, where none intrude But genii of the torrentcliff, and wood Nursling of cloud and stormthe deserts fiery brood. Great Natures man!and not a thing all light: Etherial vision of distempered sight; But mingled clouds and sunshineflame and light. With arrow not like his of sportthat go In light of musick from a silver bow: But barbed with flintwith featherreeking red, The heart-blood that some famished wolf hath shed! 16orlds unseen but by the Indian sight; His robe and hair upon the wind at length, A creature of the hills!all grace and strength: All muscle and all flamehis eager eye Fixed on one spot as if he could descry His bleeding victim nestling in the sky. Not that Apollo!not the heavenly one, Voluptuous spirit of a setting sun, But thisthe offspring of young Solitude, Child of the holy spot, where none intrude But genii of the torrentcliff, and wood Nursling of cloud and stormthe deserts fiery brood. Great Natures man!and not a thing all light: Etherial vision of distempered sight; But mingled clouds and sunshineflame and light. With arrow not like his of sportthat go In light of musick from a silver bow: But barbed with flintwith featherreeking red, The heart-blood that some famished wolf hath shed! 16CARD@7! s9217[ John Neal V Ontario of the woods! may no broad sail Ever unfold upon thy mountain gale! Thy waters were thus spreadso fresh and blue But for thy white fowl and the light canoe. Should once the smooth dark lustre of thy breast With mightier burthens, ever be oppressed Farewell to thee! and all thy loveliness! Commerce will rear her arksand Natures dress Be scattered to the winds: thy shores will bloom, Like dying flowrets sprinkled oer a tomb; The feverish, fleeting lustre of the flowers Burst into life in Arts unnatural bowers; Not the greengracefulwild luxuriance Of Natures garlands, in their negligence: The clambering jassimine, and flushing rose That in the wilderness their hearts disclose: The dewy violet, and the bud of gold, Where drooping lilies on the wave unfold; Where nameless flowers hang fainting on the air, As if they breathed their lovely spirits there; Where heaven itself is bluer, and the light 16the woods! may no broad sail Ever unfold upon thy mountain gale! Thy waters were thus spreadso fresh and blue But for thy white fowl and the light canoe. Should once the smooth dark lustre of thy breast With mightier burthens, ever be oppressed Farewell to thee! and all thy loveliness! Commerce will rear her arksand Natures dress Be scattered to the winds: thy shores will bloom, Like dying flowrets sprinkled oer a tomb; The feverish, fleeting lustre of the flowers Burst into life in Arts unnatural bowers; Not the greengracefulwild luxuriance Of Natures garlands, in their negligence: The clambering jassimine, and flushing rose That in the wilderness their hearts disclose: The dewy violet, and the bud of gold, Where drooping lilies on the wave unfold; Where nameless flowers hang fainting on the air, As if they breathed their lovely spirits there; Where heaven itself is bluer, and the light 16`CARDe@7! s9219[ John NealxV9V: It is that hour when listening ones will weep And know not why: when we would gladly sleep The last still sleep; and feel no touch of fear, Till we are startled by a falling tear, That unexpected gathers in our eye, While we were panting for yon blessed sky: That hour of gratitudeof whispering prayer, When we can hear a worship in the air: When we are lifted from the earth, and feel Light fanning wings around us faintly wheel, And oer our lids and brow a blessing steal: And thenas if our sins were all forgiven And all our tears were wipedand we in heaven! It is that hour of quiet extacy, When every ruffling wind, that passes by The sleeping leaf, makes busiest minstrelsy: When all at once! amid the quivering shade, Millions of diamond sparklers, are betrayed! When dry leaves rustle, and the whistling song Of keen-tuned grass, comes piercingly along: 16 It is that hour when listening ones will weep And know not why: when we would gladly sleep The last still sleep; and feel no touch of fear, Till we are startled by a falling tear, That unexpected gathers in our eye, While we were panting for yon blessed sky: That hour of gratitudeof whispering prayer, When we can hear a worship in the air: When we are lifted from the earth, and feel Light fanning wings around us faintly wheel, And oer our lids and brow a blessing steal: And thenas if our sins were all forgiven And all our tears were wipedand we in heaven! It is that hour of quiet extacy, When every ruffling wind, that passes by The sleeping leaf, makes busiest minstrelsy: When all at once! amid the quivering shade, Millions of diamond sparklers, are betrayed! When dry leaves rustle, and the whistling song Of keen-tuned grass, comes piercingly along: 16CARD@7! ds9221[ John Neal<yVzFresher and fresher comes the air. The blue Of yonder high pavillion swims in dew. The boundless hum that sunset waked in glee: The dark woods vesper-hymn to Liberty Hath died away. A deep outspreading hush Is on the air. The heavy, watery rush Of far off lake-tides, and the weighty roll Of tumbling deeps, that fall upon the soul Like the strong lulling of the ocean wave In dying thunder oer the sailors grave: And now and then a blueish flare is spread Faint oer the western heavens, as if twere shed In dreadful omen to the coming dead. As ifamid the skies, some warriour form Revealed his armour thro a robe of storm! The shadows deepen. Now the leaden tramp Of stationed sentryfarand flatand damp Sounds like the measured death-step, when it comes With the deep minstrelsy of unstrung drums: 16zFresher and fresher comes the air. The blue Of yonder high pavillion swims in dew. The boundless hum that sunset waked in glee: The dark woods vesper-hymn to Liberty Hath died away. A deep outspreading hush Is on the air. The heavy, watery rush Of far off lake-tides, and the weighty roll Of tumbling deeps, that fall upon the soul Like the strong lulling of the ocean wave In dying thunder oer the sailors grave: And now and then a blueish flare is spread Faint oer the western heavens, as if twere shed In dreadful omen to the coming dead. As ifamid the skies, some warriour form Revealed his armour thro a robe of storm! The shadows deepen. Now the leaden tramp Of stationed sentryfarand flatand damp Sounds like the measured death-step, when it comes With the deep minstrelsy of unstrung drums: 16 CARD Z ˀrVvqyIn this, as All, prevail Assentand you are sane Demuryoure straightway dangerous And handled with a Chain The Windtapped like a tired Man And like a HostCome in I boldly answeredentered then My Residence within A Rapidfootless Guest To offer whom a Chair Were as impossible as hand A Sofa to the Air No Bone had He to bind Him His Speech was like the Push Of numerous Humming Birds at once From a superior Bush [Emily DickinsonsˀrVvqyIn this, as All, prevail Assentand you are sane Demuryoure straightway dangerous And handled with a Chain The Windtapped like a tired Man And like a HostCome in I boldly answeredentered then My Residence within A Rapidfootless Guest To offer whom a Chair Were as impossible as hand A Sofa to the Air No Bone had He to bind Him His Speech was like the Push Of numerous Humming Birds at once From a superior Bush 3392276om w Wated @CARD_< t[ Index of Titles and First Liness94133ˀRr  rvrrrrrr rr'Ben Bolt Bench of Boors, The Bend thy bow, Dian! shoot thy silver shaft Bending above the spicy woods which blaze, Berg, The Beside the sewing-table chained and bent, Betterthat Music! For Iwho heard it Between the dark and the daylight, Between the form of Life and Life Between the wet trees and the sorry steeple, Beware! The Israelite of old, who tore Beyond Vermonts green hills, against the skies, Bible Defence of Slavery Bigelow Papers, The, from Billy in the Darbies Bird and the Bell, The Bird Language Bismarck Bit of Marble, A Black fool, why winter here? These frozen skies, Black riders came from the sea 49c1345 1925 687 2213 1903 2714 2287 766 2354 2771 713 165 2109 1290 1952 1111 1167 2793 2762 46 2897 rr rr'Ben Bolt Bench of Boors, The Bend thy bow, Dian! shoot thy silver shaft Bending above the spicy woods which blaze, Berg, The Beside the sewing-table chained and bent, Betterthat Music! For Iwho heard it Between the dark and the daylight, Between the form of Life and Life Between the wet trees and the sorry steeple, Beware! The Israelite of old, who tore Beyond Vermonts green hills, against the skies, Bible Defence of Slavery Bigelow Papers, The, from Billy in the Darbies Bird and the Bell, The Bird Language Bismarck Bit of Marble, A Black fool, why winter here? These frozen skies,  CARDiD=: 8[ Index of Titles and First Liness94143^rIaKr[\regrrr8rGHrQvrrrr De talles tree in Paradise, Deacons Masterpiece, The: or the Wonderful One-Hoss-Shay Dead, The Dead Cities Dear brother, would you know the life Dear friends, left darkling in the long eclipse Dear uplands, Chesters favorable fields, Death Song (Ojibwa) Deaths pale cold orb has turned to an eclipse Deaths Guerdon December Deep in the wave is a coral grove, Deep River Deep river, Defence of Fort McHenry Departure, The Der noble Ritter Hugo Der teufels los in Bal Mabille, Deres No Hidin Place Down Dere Deres no hidin place down dere, 49e3202 1050 1050 1183 2845 646 1075 2566 3030 1078 2755 1158 410 3217 3217 87 2869 2066 2077 3218 3218|&HCARDe, The: or the Wonderful One-Hoss-Shay Dead, The Dead Cities Dear brother, would you know the life Dear friends, left darkling in the long eclipse Dear uplands, Chesters favorable fields, Death Song (Ojibwa) Deaths pale cold orb has turned to an eclipse Deaths Guerdon December Deep in the wave is a coral grove, Deep River Deep river, Defence of Fort McHenry Departure, The Der noble Ritter Hugo Der teufels los in Bal Mabille, Deres No Hidin Place Down Dere Deres no hidin place down dere, 49e3202 1050 1050 1183 2845 646 1075 2566 3030 1078 2755 1158 410 3217 3217 87 2869 2066 2077 3218 3218|&HCARDCARDQ@ y 6s94258[ Audio Index(V*BDE IK NP SoVqV   V  !HVJbde km pr xV   VMy life closed twice before its close read by Garrison Keillor HENRY CLAY WORK Marching Through Georgia performed by William Bolcom and Joan Morris Come Home, Father! performed by William Bolcom and Joan Morris ADAH ISAACS MENKEN Judith read by Ann Lauterbach MARK TWAIN Ode to Stephen Dowling Bots, Decd. read by Garrison Keillor WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS November read by N. Scott Momaday ABRAM JOSEPH RYAN Lines read by Allan Gurganus 1K2378 2378 2395 2395 2398 2398 2416 2416 2421 2421 2463 2463 2492 2492rillin 1K2378 2378 2395 2395 2398 2398 2416 2416 2421 2421 2463 2463 2492 2492@CARD@|]  HV.x`chapter titleon mousedown showcontents end mousedownPw) overheadon mousedown showcontents end mousedownVs New Chapter William Ellery Channing William Ellery Channing William Ellery Channing91257[William Ellery ChanningP>?Q4Q5V6YQZQVQQVQQV3Q5UQVVW{Q|QVV The Harbor No more I seek, the prize is found, I furl my sails, my voyage is oer; The treacherous waves no longer sound But sing thy praise along the shore. I steal from all I hoped of old, To throw more beauty round thy way; The dross I part, and melt the gold, And stamp it with thy every-day. I did not dream to welcome thee; Like all I have thou camest unknown, An island in a misty sea, With stars, and flowers, and harvests strown. +WILLIAM ELLERY CHANNING (18181901)2 K m     ) 4 < I Q W _ WILLIAM ELLERY CHANNING (November 29, 1818December 23, 1901) b. Boston, Massachusetts. Son of Barbara Perkins and Dr. Walter Channing (distinguished surgeon and Harvard professor); nephew of the Unitarian clergyman of the same name. Following his mothers death in 1823, raised in household of great-aunt Mrs. Bennett Forbes (born Margaret Perkins) in Milton, Massachusetts. Early education at Round Hill School (Northampton), the Boston Latin School, and Hubbards Academy in Brookline. Entered Harvard College in 1834, but left after only a few months to devote himself to poetry. Began publishing poems, essays, and sketches in 1835 in the Boston Mercantile Journal and New England Magazine. Continued studies on his own; family distressed that he had not secured a vocation. In 1839 purchased a farm in McHenry County, Illinois, and relocated there, returning home for occasional visits. Emerson reviewed his verses favorably in The Dial in 1840; the two men met in December while Channing was visiting from Illinois. In 1841, sold Illinois farm and moved to Cincinnati where he worked as tutor and journalist, and read desultorily for law; met Ellen Fuller (sister of Margaret Fuller), whom he married in September 1841 against the wishes of his family; the couple had two daughters and three sons. Returned to Massachusetts in 1842, living for a short time in Cambridge before settling with Ellen in Concord. During 184445, worked in New York on editorial staff of Horace Greeleys New-York Tribune; traveled briefly to Italy from March to July of 1846; published book based on 16-day stay in Rome, Conversations in Rome between an Artist, a Catholic, and a Critic (1847). Marriage troubled by Channings neglect of family responsibilities; Ellen left him in 1853, returned in 1855, and died in 1856. Children reared by relatives as Channing lived alone in Concord, virtually cut off from family. Edited New Bedford Mercury, 185658. Continued friendship with Emerson; other friends included Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, Bronson Alcott, James Russell Lowell, and especially Henry David Thoreau, whom he accompanied on trips to Cape Cod, Maine, and Canada, and on frequent excursions around Concord. (Wrote first biography of Thoreau, Thoreau, The Poet-Naturalist, 1873; edited a number of Thoreaus works in collaboration with Thoreaus sister Sophia.) Last years spent in the home of his friend Franklin B. Sanborn. Published verse collections Poems (1843), Poems, Second Series (1847), and The Woodman (1849), and book-length poems Near Home (1858), The Wanderer (1871), Eliot (1885), and John Brown and the Heroes of Harpers Ferry (1886).Channing, William E.2_opNMASTCARD@7! `s9227[Carlos WilcoxWith each new impulse chimes a feeble note. The russet grasshopper, at times, is heard, Snapping his many wings, as half he flies, Half hovers in the air. Where strikes the sun With sultriest beams, upon the sandy plain, Or stony mount, or in the close deep vale, The harmless locust of this western clime, At intervals, amid the leaves unseen, Is heard to sing with one unbroken sound, As with a long-drawn breath, beginning low, And rising to the midst with shriller swell, Then in low cadence dying all away. Beside the stream collected in a flock, The noiseless butterflies, though on the ground, Continue still to wave their open fans Powderd with gold; while on the jutting twigs The spindling insects that frequent the banks, Rest, with their thin transparent wings outspread As when they fly. Oft times, though seldom seen, The cuckoo, that in summer haunts our groves, Is heard to moan, as if at every breath With each new impulse chimes a feeble note. The russet grasshopper, at times, is heard, Snapping his many wings, as half he flies, Half hovers in the air. Where strikes the sun With sultriest beams, upon the sandy plain, Or stony mount, or in the close deep vale, The harmless locust of this western clime, At intervals, amid the leaves unseen, Is heard to sing with one unbroken sound, As with a long-drawn breath, beginning low, And rising to the midst with shriller swell, Then in low cadence dying all away. Beside the stream collected in a flock, The noiseless butterflies, though on the ground, Continue still to wave their open fans Powderd with gold; while on the jutting twigs The spindling insects that frequent the banks, Rest, with their thin transparent wings outspread As when they fly. Oft times, though seldom seen, The cuckoo, that in summer haunts our groves, Is heard to moan, as if at every breath 17 CARD  V.x}chapter titleon mousedown showcontents end mousedownPw) overheadon mousedown showcontents end mousedown0FRANCES ELLEN WATKINS HARPER (18251911)B.>7V8oVpVV The Slave Mother Heard you that shriek? It rose So wildly on the air, It seemd as if a burdend heart Was breaking in despair. Saw you those hands so sadly clasped The bowed and feeble head The shuddering of that fragile form That look of grief and dread? [Frances Ellen Watkins Harperes New Chapter Frances Ellen Watkins Harper Frances Ellen Watkins Harper Frances Ellen Watkins Harper9210723 ZCDt>ND`  0 ^ o FRANCES ELLEN WATKINS HARPER (September 24, 1825February 22, 1911) b. Baltimore, Maryland. Parents were free blacks; given name Frances Ellen Watkins; she was orphaned at early age. Attended school run by uncle, the Rev. William Watkins (a frequent contributor to The Liberator). Found work in a bookshop in Baltimore. Published collection of poetry, Forest Leaves (1845), of which no copies are known to be extant. In 1850 took position teaching sewing at Union Seminary, near Columbus, Ohio, a school for free blacks founded by the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Two years later left for Little York, Pennsylvania, where she obtained another teaching position. Met black abolitionist William Grant Still, who became close friend; in 1854 moved to Philadelphia and became active in anti-slavery movement, working under Stills direction for Underground Railroad. Poems on Miscellaneous Subjects (1854), published with a preface by William Lloyd Garrison, enjoyed wide circulation and went through several editions. Lectured widely, 185460, initially for Maine Antislavery Society, and then throughout New England, in Canada, and in western states. Her poems, stories, lectures, and speeches published regularly in abolitionist press. Married widower Fenton Harper (who had three children) in 1860 and settled in Columbus, Ohio; they had a daughter, Mary. After husbands death in 1864, resumed career as lecturer and organizer; toured South frequently in late 1860s and early 1870s. Published two volumes of narrative poetry, Moses: A Story of the Nile (1869; expanded 1889; later incorporated in Idylls of the Bible, 1901) and Sketches of Southern Life (1872), as well as the verse collection Poems (1871). In 1871 settled permanently in Philadelphia. Founder and assistant superintendent of a YMCA Sabbath School from 1872. Active in many political and social organizations in later years, including American Association of Education of Colored Youth (of which she became director in 1894), Womens Christian Temperance Union, American Woman Suffrage Association, and American Equal Rights Association; associates included Frederick Douglass, Ida Wells Barnett, Harriet Tubman, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Novel Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted published in 1892; later poetry collected in Atlanta Offering (1895). Addressed World Congress of Representative Women in 1893 at Worlds Columbian Exposition in Chicago. In 1896 helped found National Association of Colored Women, of which she became vice-president the following year. ELLEN WATKINS HARPER (18251911)FREEFree Object their thin transparent wings outspread As when they fly. Oft times, though seldom seen, The cuckoo, that in summer haunts our groves, Is heard to moan, as if at every breath 17 CARD  V.x}chapter titleon mousedown showcontents end mousedownPw) overheadon mousedown showcontents end mousedown0FRANCES ELLEN WATKINS HARPER (18251911)B.>7V8oVpVV The Slave Mother Heard you that shriek? It rose So wildly on the air, It seemd as if a burdend heart Was breaking in despair. Saw you those hands so sadly clasped The bowed and feeble head The shuddering of that fragile form That look of grief and dread? [Frances Ellen Watkins Harperes New Chapter Frances Ellen Watkins Harper Frances Ellen Watkins Harper Frances Ellen Watkins Harper9210723 ZCDt>ND`  0 ^ o FRANCES ELLEN WATKINS HARPER (September 24, 1825February 22, 1911) b. Baltimore, Maryland. Parents were free blacks; given name Frances Ellen Watkins; she was orphaned at early age. Attended school run by uncle, the Rev. William Watkins (a frequent contributor to The Liberator). Found work in a bookshop in Baltimore. Published collection of poetry, Forest Leaves (1845), of which no copies are known to be extant. In 1850 took position teaching sewing at Union Seminary, near Columbus, Ohio, a school for free blacks founded by the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Two years later left for Little York, Pennsylvania, where she obtained another teaching position. Met black abolitionist William Grant Still, who became close friend; in 1854 moved to Philadelphia and became active in anti-slavery movement, working under Stills direction for Underground Railroad. Poems on Miscellaneous Subjects (1854), published with a preface by William Lloyd Garrison, enjoyed wide circulation and went through several editions. Lectured widely, 185460, initially for Maine Antislavery Society, and then throughout New England, in Canada, and in western states. Her poems, stories, lectures, and speeches published regularly in abolitionist press. Married widower Fenton Harper (who had three children) in 1860 and settled in Columbus, Ohio; they had a daughter, Mary. After husbands death in 1864, resumed career as lecturer and organizer; toured South frequently in late 1860s and early 1870s. Published two volumes of narrative poetry, Moses: A Story of the Nile (1869; expanded 1889; later incorporated in Idylls of the Bible, 1901) and Sketches of Southern Life (1872), as well as the verse collection Poems (1871). In 1871 settled permanently in Philadelphia. Founder and assistant superintendent of a YMCA Sabbath School from 1872. Active in many political and social organizations in later years, including American Association of Education of Colored Youth (of which she became director in 1894), Womens Christian Temperance Union, American Woman Suffrage Association, and American Equal Rights Association; associates included Frederick Douglass, Ida Wells Barnett, Harriet Tubman, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Novel Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted published in 1892; later poetry collected in Atlanta Offering (1895). Addressed World Congress of Representative Women in 1893 at Worlds Columbian Exposition in Chicago. In 1896 helped found National Association of Colored Women, of which she became vice-president the following year. ELLEN WATKINS HARPER (18251911) FREEFree Object bitter hour come like a blight Over thy spirit, and sad images Of the stern agony, and shroud, and pall, And breathless darkness, and the narrow house, Make thee to shudder, and grow sick at heart; Go forth, under the open sky, and list 18@CARD"?@9| s9249[William Cullen Bryantd >Oh Fairest of the Rural Maids Oh fairest of the rural maids! Thy birth was in the forest shades; Green boughs, and glimpses of the sky, Were all that met thy infant eye. Thy sports, thy wanderings, when a child, Were ever in the sylvan wild; And all the beauty of the place Is in thy heart and on thy face. The twilight of the trees and rocks Is in the light shade of thy locks; Thy step is as the wind, that weaves Its playful way among the leaves. Thy eyes are springs, in whose serene And silent waters heaven is seen; Their lashes are the herbs that look On their young figures in the brook. d rOh Fairest of the Rural Maids Oh fairest of the rural maids! Thy birth was in the forest shades; Green boughs, and glimpses of the sky, Were all that met thy infant eye. Thy sports, thy wanderings, when a child, Were ever in the sylvan wild; And all the beauty of the place Is in thy heart and on thy face. The twilight of the trees and rocks Is in the light shade of thy locks; Thy step is as the wind, that weaves Its playful way among the leaves. Thy eyes are springs, in whose serene And silent waters heaven is seen; Their lashes are the herbs that look On their young figures in the brook. 18CARDw@= |s9317[William Cullen BryantV Is there no other change for thee, that lurks Among the future ages? Will not man Seek out strange arts to wither and deform The pleasant landscape which thou makest green? Or shall the veins that feed thy constant stream Be choked in middle earth, and flow no more For ever, that the water-plants along Thy channel perish, and the bird in vain Alight to drink? Haply shall these green hills Sink, with the lapse of years, into the gulf Of ocean waters, and thy source be lost Amidst the bitter brine? Or shall they rise, Upheaved in broken cliffs and airy peaks, Haunts of the eagle and the snake, and thou Gush midway from the bare and barren steep? V Is there no other change for thee, that lurks Among the future ages? Will not man Seek out strange arts to wither and deform The pleasant landscape which thou makest green? Or shall the veins that feed thy constant stream Be choked in middle earth, and flow no more For ever, that the water-plants along Thy channel perish, and the bird in vain Alight to drink? Haply shall these green hills Sink, with the lapse of years, into the gulf Of ocean waters, and thy source be lost Amidst the bitter brine? Or shall they rise, Upheaved in broken cliffs and airy peaks, Haunts of the eagle and the snake, and thou Gush midway from the bare and barren steep? 18@CARD,& WThe river-riches of the sphere, All that the dark sea-bottoms bear, The wide earths green convexity, The inexhaustible blue sky, Hold not a prize, so proud, so high, That it could grace her, gay or grand, By garden-gale and rose-breath fanned; Or as to-night I saw her stand, Lovely in the meadow-land, With a clover in her hand. [Frederick Goddard Tuckermans9198313ttkmene, All that the dark sea-bottoms bear, The wide earths green convexity, The inexhaustible blue sky, Hold not a prize, so proud, so high, That it could grace her, gay or grand, By garden-gale and rose-breath fanned; Or as to-night I saw her stand, Lovely in the meadow-land, With a clover in her hand. 13ttkmen CARD@8 s9243[William Cullen BryantK>VA Winter Piece The time has been that these wild solitudes, Yet beautiful as wildwere trod by me Oftener than now; and when the ills of life Had chafed my spiritwhen the unsteady pulse Beat with strange flutteringsI would wander forth And seek the woods. The sunshine on my path Was to me as a friend. The swelling hills, The quiet dells retiring far between, With gentle invitation to explore Their windings, were a calm society That talked with me and soothed me. Then the chant Of birds, and chime of brooks, and soft caress Of the fresh sylvan air, made me forget The thoughts that broke my peace, and I began To gather simples by the fountains brink, And lose myself in day-dreams. While I stood In natures loneliness, I was with one With whom I early grew familiar, one Who never had a frown for me, whose voice KrVA Winter Piece The time has been that these wild solitudes, Yet beautiful as wildwere trod by me Oftener than now; and when the ills of life Had chafed my spiritwhen the unsteady pulse Beat with strange flutteringsI would wander forth And seek the woods. The sunshine on my path Was to me as a friend. The swelling hills, The quiet dells retiring far between, With gentle invitation to explore Their windings, were a calm society That talked with me and soothed me. Then the chant Of birds, and chime of brooks, and soft caress Of the fresh sylvan air, made me forget The thoughts that broke my peace, and I began To gather simples by the fountains brink, And lose myself in day-dreams. While I stood In natures loneliness, I was with one With whom I early grew familiar, one Who never had a frown for me, whose voice 18"(֠s" CARD@G s9462[Edward Coote PinkneyL6>>And fast went by those moments bright, Like meteors shooting through the night; But faster fleeted the wild dream, That clothed them with their transient beam. Yet love can years to days condense, And long appeared that life intense; It was,to give a better measure Than time,a century of pleasure. Serenade Look out upon the stars, my love, And shame them with thine eyes, On which, than on the lights above, There hang more destinies. Nights beauty is the harmony Of blending shades and light; Then, Lady, up,look out, and be A sister to the night! L6r>And fast went by those moments bright, Like meteors shooting through the night; But faster fleeted the wild dream, That clothed them with their transient beam. Yet love can years to days condense, And long appeared that life intense; It was,to give a better measure Than time,a century of pleasure. Serenade Look out upon the stars, my love, And shame them with thine eyes, On which, than on the lights above, There hang more destinies. Nights beauty is the harmony Of blending shades and light; Then, Lady, up,look out, and be A sister to the night! 26h@ss XCARD@8 Js9236[William Cullen Bryant*Q+V-FQHVJeQfQQVQVQ"Q#MQNVPnQpVrQQQQVQVQV4Q5bQOr where the rocking billows rise and sink On the chafed ocean side? There is a Power whose care Teaches thy way along that pathless coast, The desert and illimitable air, Lone wandering, but not lost. All day thy wings have fanned, At that far height, the cold thin atmosphere, Yet stoop not, weary, to the welcome land, Though the dark night is near. And soon that toil shall end, Soon shalt thou find a summer home, and rest, And scream among thy fellows; reeds shall bend, Soon, oer thy sheltered nest. Thourt gone, the abyss of heaven Hath swallowd up thy form; yet, on my heart 18V-FQHVJeQfQQVQVQ"Q#MQNVPnQpVrQQQQVQVQV4Q5bQOr where the rocking billows rise and sink On the chafed ocean side? There is a Power whose care Teaches thy way along that pathless coast, The desert and illimitable air, Lone wandering, but not lost. All day thy wings have fanned, At that far height, the cold thin atmosphere, Yet stoop not, weary, to the welcome land, Though the dark night is near. And soon that toil shall end, Soon shalt thou find a summer home, and rest, And scream among thy fellows; reeds shall bend, Soon, oer thy sheltered nest. Thourt gone, the abyss of heaven Hath swallowd up thy form; yet, on my heart 18on my heart 18CARD8@8 Hs9240[William Cullen BryantZV[And they, whose meadows it murmurs through, Have named the stream from its own fair hue. Yet pure its watersits shallows are bright With colored pebbles and sparkles of light, And clear the depths where its eddies play, And dimples deepen and whirl away, And the plane-trees speckled arms oershoot The swifter current that mines its root, Through whose shifting leaves, as you walk the hill, The quivering glimmer of sun and rill, With a sudden flash on the eye is thrown, Like the ray that streams from the diamond stone. Oh, loveliest there the spring days come, With blossoms, and birds, and wild-bees hum; The flowers of summer are fairest there, And freshest the breath of the summer air; And sweetest the golden autumn day In silence and sunshine glides away. 18And they, whose meadows it murmurs through, Have named the stream from its own fair hue. Yet pure its watersits shallows are bright With colored pebbles and sparkles of light, And clear the depths where its eddies play, And dimples deepen and whirl away, And the plane-trees speckled arms oershoot The swifter current that mines its root, Through whose shifting leaves, as you walk the hill, The quivering glimmer of sun and rill, With a sudden flash on the eye is thrown, Like the ray that streams from the diamond stone. Oh, loveliest there the spring days come, With blossoms, and birds, and wild-bees hum; The flowers of summer are fairest there, And freshest the breath of the summer air; And sweetest the golden autumn day In silence and sunshine glides away. 18CARD@8 s9241[William Cullen Bryant(VV Yet fair as thou art, thou shunst to glide, Beautiful stream! by the village side; But windest away from haunts of men, To quiet valley and shaded glen; And forest, and meadow, and slope of hill, Around thee, are lonely, lovely, and still. Lonelysave when, by thy rippling tides, From thicket to thicket the angler glides; Or the simpler comes with basket and book, For herbs of power on thy banks to look; Or haply, some idle dreamer, like me, To wander, and muse, and gaze on thee. Stillsave the chirp of birds that feed On the river cherry and seedy reed, And thy own mild music gushing out With mellow murmur and fairy shout, From dawn, to the blush of another day, Like traveller singing along his way. That fairy music I never hear, Nor gaze on those waters so green and clear, (VV Yet fair as thou art, thou shunst to glide, Beautiful stream! by the village side; But windest away from haunts of men, To quiet valley and shaded glen; And forest, and meadow, and slope of hill, Around thee, are lonely, lovely, and still. Lonelysave when, by thy rippling tides, From thicket to thicket the angler glides; Or the simpler comes with basket and book, For herbs of power on thy banks to look; Or haply, some idle dreamer, like me, To wander, and muse, and gaze on thee. Stillsave the chirp of birds that feed On the river cherry and seedy reed, And thy own mild music gushing out With mellow murmur and fairy shout, From dawn, to the blush of another day, Like traveller singing along his way. That fairy music I never hear, Nor gaze on those waters so green and clear, 18CARD@8 s9244[William Cullen BryantNever rebuked me for the hours I stole From cares I loved not, but of which the world Deems highest, to converse with her. When shrieked The bleak November winds, and smote the woods, And the brown fields were herbless, and the shades, That met above the merry rivulet, Were spoiled, I sought, I loved them still,they seemed Like old companions in adversity. Still there was beauty in my walks; the brook, Bordered with sparkling frost-work, was as gay As with its fringe of summer flowers. Afar, The village with its spires, the path of streams, And dim receding valleys, hid before By interposing trees, lay visible Through the bare grove, and my familiar haunts Seemed new to me. Nor was I slow to come Among them, when the clouds, from their still skirts, Had shaken down on earth the feathery snow, And all was white. The pure keen air abroad, Albeit it breathed no scent of herb, nor heard Love call of bird nor merry hum of bee, Never rebuked me for the hours I stole From cares I loved not, but of which the world Deems highest, to converse with her. When shrieked The bleak November winds, and smote the woods, And the brown fields were herbless, and the shades, That met above the merry rivulet, Were spoiled, I sought, I loved them still,they seemed Like old companions in adversity. Still there was beauty in my walks; the brook, Bordered with sparkling frost-work, was as gay As with its fringe of summer flowers. Afar, The village with its spires, the path of streams, And dim receding valleys, hid before By interposing trees, lay visible Through the bare grove, and my familiar haunts Seemed new to me. Nor was I slow to come Among them, when the clouds, from their still skirts, Had shaken down on earth the feathery snow, And all was white. The pure keen air abroad, Albeit it breathed no scent of herb, nor heard Love call of bird nor merry hum of bee, 18CARD;@9| ts9246[William Cullen BryantWhile the slant sun of February pours Into the bowers a flood of light. Approach! The encrusted surface shall upbear thy steps, And the broad arching portals of the grove Welcome thy entering. Look! the massy trunks Are cased in the pure chrystal, each light spray, Nodding and tinkling in the breath of heaven, Is studded with its trembling water-drops, That stream with rainbow radiance as they move. But round the parent stem the long low boughs Bend, in a glittering ring, and arbors hide The grassy floor. Oh! you might deem the spot, The spacious cavern of the virgin mine, Deep in the womb of earthwhere the gems grow, And diamonds put forth radiant rods and bud With amethyst and topazand the place Lit up, most royally, with the pure beam That dwells in them. Or haply the vast hall Of fairy palace, that outlasts the night, And fades not in the glory of the sun; Where chrystal columns send forth slender shafts While the slant sun of February pours Into the bowers a flood of light. Approach! The encrusted surface shall upbear thy steps, And the broad arching portals of the grove Welcome thy entering. Look! the massy trunks Are cased in the pure chrystal, each light spray, Nodding and tinkling in the breath of heaven, Is studded with its trembling water-drops, That stream with rainbow radiance as they move. But round the parent stem the long low boughs Bend, in a glittering ring, and arbors hide The grassy floor. Oh! you might deem the spot, The spacious cavern of the virgin mine, Deep in the womb of earthwhere the gems grow, And diamonds put forth radiant rods and bud With amethyst and topazand the place Lit up, most royally, with the pure beam That dwells in them. Or haply the vast hall Of fairy palace, that outlasts the night, And fades not in the glory of the sun; Where chrystal columns send forth slender shafts 18CARD @9| s9247[William Cullen Bryant€VAnd crossing arches; and fantastic aisles Wind from the sight in brightness, and are lost Among the crowded pillars. Raise thine eye, Thou seest no cavern roof, no palace vault; There the blue sky and the white drifting cloud Look in. Again the wildered fancy dreams Of spouting fountains, frozen as they rose, And fixed, with all their branching jets, in air, And all their sluices sealed. All, all is light; Light without shade. But all shall pass away With the next sun. From numberless vast trunks, Loosened, the crashing ice shall make a sound Like the far roar of rivers, and the eve Shall close oer the brown woods as it was wont. And it is pleasant, when the noisy streams Are just set free, and milder suns melt off The plashy snow, save only the firm drift In the deep glen or the close shade of pines, Tis pleasant to behold the wreaths of smoke Roll up among the maples of the hill, Where the shrill sound of youthful voices wakes €VAnd crossing arches; and fantastic aisles Wind from the sight in brightness, and are lost Among the crowded pillars. Raise thine eye, Thou seest no cavern roof, no palace vault; There the blue sky and the white drifting cloud Look in. Again the wildered fancy dreams Of spouting fountains, frozen as they rose, And fixed, with all their branching jets, in air, And all their sluices sealed. All, all is light; Light without shade. But all shall pass away With the next sun. From numberless vast trunks, Loosened, the crashing ice shall make a sound Like the far roar of rivers, and the eve Shall close oer the brown woods as it was wont. And it is pleasant, when the noisy streams Are just set free, and milder suns melt off The plashy snow, save only the firm drift In the deep glen or the close shade of pines, Tis pleasant to behold the wreaths of smoke Roll up among the maples of the hill, Where the shrill sound of youthful voices wakes 18CARD#@9| s9250[William Cullen BryantV> VVV+V,UVVVVV The forest depths, by foot unprest, Are not more sinless than thy breast; The holy peace, that fills the air Of those calm solitudes, is there. The Ages I. When to the common rest that crowns our days, Called in the noon of life, the good man goes, Or full of years, and ripe in wisdom, lays His silver temples in their last repose; When, oer the buds of youth the death-wind blows, And blights the fairest; when our bitterest tears Stream, as the eyes of those that love us close, We think on what they were, with many fears Lest Goodness die with them, and leave the coming years. NrVVV+V,UVVVVV The forest depths, by foot unprest, Are not more sinless than thy breast; The holy peace, that fills the air Of those calm solitudes, is there. The Ages I. When to the common rest that crowns our days, Called in the noon of life, the good man goes, Or full of years, and ripe in wisdom, lays His silver temples in their last repose; When, oer the buds of youth the death-wind blows, And blights the fairest; when our bitterest tears Stream, as the eyes of those that love us close, We think on what they were, with many fears Lest Goodness die with them, and leave the coming years. 18`CARD$q@9| $s9251[William Cullen Bryant V6V7hViVVV&V'\V] VV(V)LVMyVzVVVII. And therefore, to our hearts, the days gone by, When lived the honored sage whose death we wept, And the soft virtues beamed from many an eye, And beat in many a heart that long has slept, Like spots of earth where angel-feet have stept Are holy; and high-dreaming bards have told Of times when worth was crowned, and faith was kept, Ere friendship grew a snare, or love waxed cold Those pure and happy timesthe golden days of old. III. Peace to the just mans memory,let it grow Greener with years, and blossom through the flight Of ages; let the mimic canvas show His calm benevolent features; let the light Stream on his deeds of love, that shunned the sight Of all but heaven, and, in the book of fame, The glorious record of his virtues write, And hold it up to men, and bid them claim A palm like his, and catch from him the hallowed flame. V6V7hViVVV&V'\V]VV(V)LVMyVzVVVII. And therefore, to our hearts, the days gone by, When lived the honored sage whose death we wept, And the soft virtues beamed from many an eye, And beat in many a heart that long has slept, Like spots of earth where angel-feet have stept Are holy; and high-dreaming bards have told Of times when worth was crowned, and faith was kept, Ere friendship grew a snare, or love waxed cold Those pure and happy timesthe golden days of old. III. Peace to the just mans memory,let it grow Greener with years, and blossom through the flight Of ages; let the mimic canvas show His calm benevolent features; let the light Stream on his deeds of love, that shunned the sight Of all but heaven, and, in the book of fame, The glorious record of his virtues write, And hold it up to men, and bid them claim A palm like his, and catch from him the hallowed flame. 18ed f`CARD'@9| s9253[William Cullen Bryant V6V7bVcVVVVGVH VV V=V>hViVVVVI. Look on this beautiful world, and read the truth In her fair page; see, every season brings New change, to her, of everlasting youth; Still the green soil, with joyous living things, Swarms, the wide air is full of joyous wings, And myriads, still, are happy in the sleep Of oceans azure gulfs, and where he flings The restless surge. Eternal Love doth keep In his complacent arms, the earth, the air, the deep. VII. Will then the merciful One, who stamped our race With his own image, and who gave them sway Oer earth, and the glad dwellers on her face, Now that our flourishing nations far away Are spread, whereer the moist earth drinks the day, Forget the ancient care that taught and nursed His latest offspring? will he quench the ray Infused by his own forming smile at first, And leave a work so fair all blighted and accursed?  V6V7bVcVVVVGVHVV V=V>hViVVVVI. Look on this beautiful world, and read the truth In her fair page; see, every season brings New change, to her, of everlasting youth; Still the green soil, with joyous living things, Swarms, the wide air is full of joyous wings, And myriads, still, are happy in the sleep Of oceans azure gulfs, and where he flings The restless surge. Eternal Love doth keep In his complacent arms, the earth, the air, the deep. VII. Will then the merciful One, who stamped our race With his own image, and who gave them sway Oer earth, and the glad dwellers on her face, Now that our flourishing nations far away Are spread, whereer the moist earth drinks the day, Forget the ancient care that taught and nursed His latest offspring? will he quench the ray Infused by his own forming smile at first, And leave a work so fair all blighted and accursed? 18CARD*@9| Ps9255[William Cullen Bryant4V6A BDVEqVrVVV"V#OVP}V~ VVBVCpVqVVThe truth of heaven, and kneeled to gods that heard them not. X. Then waited not the murderer for the night, But smote his brother down in the bright day, And he who felt the wrong, and had the might, His own avenger, girt himself to slay; Beside the path the unburied carcass lay; The shepherd, by the fountains of the glen, Fled, while the robber swept his flock away, And slew his babes. The sick, untended then, Languished in the damp shade, and died afar from men. XI. But misery brought in lovein passions strife Man gave his heart to mercy pleading long, And sought out gentle deeds to gladden life; The weak, against the sons of spoil and wrong, Banded, and watched their hamlets, and grew strong. States rose, and, in the shadow of their might, ~4V6DVEqVrVVV"V#OVP}V~VVBVCpVqVVThe truth of heaven, and kneeled to gods that heard them not. X. Then waited not the murderer for the night, But smote his brother down in the bright day, And he who felt the wrong, and had the might, His own avenger, girt himself to slay; Beside the path the unburied carcass lay; The shepherd, by the fountains of the glen, Fled, while the robber swept his flock away, And slew his babes. The sick, untended then, Languished in the damp shade, and died afar from men. XI. But misery brought in lovein passions strife Man gave his heart to mercy pleading long, And sought out gentle deeds to gladden life; The weak, against the sons of spoil and wrong, Banded, and watched their hamlets, and grew strong. States rose, and, in the shadow of their might, 18CARD-_@9| s9257[William Cullen BryantV*V+ZV[VV "$V%SVTVVV V 1V2iVj VV  Heaped like a host in battle overthrown; Vast ruins, where the mountains ribs of stone Were hewn into a city; streets that spread In the dark earth, where never breath has blown Of heavens sweet air, nor foot of man dares tread The long and perilous waysthe Cities of the Dead; XIV. And tombs of monarchs to the clouds up-piled They perishedbut the eternal tombs remain And the black precipice, abrupt and wild, Pierced by long toil and hollowed to a fane; Huge piers and frowning forms of gods sustain The everlasting arches, dark and wide, Like the night heaven when clouds are black with rain. But idly skill was tasked, and strength was plied, All was the work of slaves to swell a despots pride. XV. And virtue cannot dwell with slaves, nor reign Oer those who cower to take a tyrants yoke; zV*V+ZV[VV$V%SVTVVV V 1V2iVjVV  Heaped like a host in battle overthrown; Vast ruins, where the mountains ribs of stone Were hewn into a city; streets that spread In the dark earth, where never breath has blown Of heavens sweet air, nor foot of man dares tread The long and perilous waysthe Cities of the Dead; XIV. And tombs of monarchs to the clouds up-piled They perishedbut the eternal tombs remain And the black precipice, abrupt and wild, Pierced by long toil and hollowed to a fane; Huge piers and frowning forms of gods sustain The everlasting arches, dark and wide, Like the night heaven when clouds are black with rain. But idly skill was tasked, and strength was plied, All was the work of slaves to swell a despots pride. XV. And virtue cannot dwell with slaves, nor reign Oer those who cower to take a tyrants yoke; 18CARD/^@9| <s9259[William Cullen BryantV+V,TVUVVVVeVgr wyVzVVV'V(SVTVVV Thy glory, and redeemed thy blotted name; The story of thy better deeds, engraved On fames unmouldering pillar, puts to shame Our chiller virtue; the high art to tame The whirlwind of thy passions was thine own; And the pure ray, that from thy bosom came, Far over many a land and age has shone, And mingles with the light that beams from Gods own throne. XVIII. And Romethy sterner, younger sister, she Who awed the world with her imperial frown Rome drew the spirit of her race from thee, The rival of thy shame and thy renown. Yet her degenerate children sold the crown Of earths wide kingdoms to a line of slaves; Guilt reigned, and wo with guilt, and plagues came down, Till the North broke its flood-gates, and the waves ~V+V,TVUVVVVeVgyVzVVV'V(SVTVVV Thy glory, and redeemed thy blotted name; The story of thy better deeds, engraved On fames unmouldering pillar, puts to shame Our chiller virtue; the high art to tame The whirlwind of thy passions was thine own; And the pure ray, that from thy bosom came, Far over many a land and age has shone, And mingles with the light that beams from Gods own throne. XVIII. And Romethy sterner, younger sister, she Who awed the world with her imperial frown Rome drew the spirit of her race from thee, The rival of thy shame and thy renown. Yet her degenerate children sold the crown Of earths wide kingdoms to a line of slaves; Guilt reigned, and wo with guilt, and plagues came down, Till the North broke its flood-gates, and the waves 18CARD3@:k s9262[William Cullen BryantV-V.]V^VV  "V#VVWVVVVDVErVsVV The wretch with felon stains upon his soul; And crimes were set to sale, and hard his dole Who could not bribe a passage to the skies; And vice beneath the mitres kind control, Sinned gaily on, and grew to giant size, Shielded by priestly power; and watched by priestly eyes. XXIII. At last the earthquake camethe shock, that hurled To dust, in many fragments dashed and strown, The throne, whose roots were in another world, And whose far-stretching shadow awed our own. From many a proud monastic pile, oerthrown, Fear-struck, the hooded inmates rushed and fled; The web, that for a thousand years had grown Oer prostrate Europe, in that day of dread Crumbled and fell, as fire dissolves the flaxen thread. XXIV. The spirit of that day is still awake, And spreads himself, and shall not sleep again; zV-V.]V^VV"V#VVWVVVVDVErVsVV The wretch with felon stains upon his soul; And crimes were set to sale, and hard his dole Who could not bribe a passage to the skies; And vice beneath the mitres kind control, Sinned gaily on, and grew to giant size, Shielded by priestly power; and watched by priestly eyes. XXIII. At last the earthquake camethe shock, that hurled To dust, in many fragments dashed and strown, The throne, whose roots were in another world, And whose far-stretching shadow awed our own. From many a proud monastic pile, oerthrown, Fear-struck, the hooded inmates rushed and fled; The web, that for a thousand years had grown Oer prostrate Europe, in that day of dread Crumbled and fell, as fire dissolves the flaxen thread. XXIV. The spirit of that day is still awake, And spreads himself, and shall not sleep again; 18CARD5 @:k s9263[William Cullen BryantÀV1V2_V`VVVN QSVT~VVVVEVFpVqV V But through the idle mesh of power shall break, Like billows oer the Asian monarchs chain; Till men are filled with him, and feel how vain, Instead of the pure heart and innocent hands, Are all the proud and pompous modes to gain The smile of heaven;till a new age expands Its white and holy wings above the peaceful lands. XXV. For look again on the past years;behold, Flown, like the night-mares hideous shapes, away Full many a horrible worship, that, of old, Held, oer the shuddering realms, unquestioned sway: See crimes that feared not once the eye of day, Rooted from men, without a name or place: See nations blotted out from earth, to pay The forfeit of deep guilt;with glad embrace The fair disburdened lands welcome a nobler race. XXVI. Thus errors monstrous shapes from earth are driven; zV1V2_V`VVVSVT~VVVVEVFpVqVV But through the idle mesh of power shall break, Like billows oer the Asian monarchs chain; Till men are filled with him, and feel how vain, Instead of the pure heart and innocent hands, Are all the proud and pompous modes to gain The smile of heaven;till a new age expands Its white and holy wings above the peaceful lands. XXV. For look again on the past years;behold, Flown, like the night-mares hideous shapes, away Full many a horrible worship, that, of old, Held, oer the shuddering realms, unquestioned sway: See crimes that feared not once the eye of day, Rooted from men, without a name or place: See nations blotted out from earth, to pay The forfeit of deep guilt;with glad embrace The fair disburdened lands welcome a nobler race. XXVI. Thus errors monstrous shapes from earth are driven; 18@CARD8@:k s9265[William Cullen Bryant〒 V 9V:`VaVVVVFVG VV V 8V9eVfVVVXXVIII. And where his willing waves yon bright blue bay Sends up, to kiss his decorated brim, And cradles, in his soft embrace, the gay Young group of grassy islands born of him, And, crowding nigh, or in the distance dim, Lifts the white throng of sails, that bear or bring The commerce of the world;with tawny limb, And belt and beads in sunlight glistening, The savage urged his skiff like wild bird on the wing. XXIX. Then, all this youthful paradise around, And all the broad and boundless mainland, lay Cooled by the interminable wood, that frowned Oer mount and vale, where never summer ray Glanced, till the strong tornado broke his way Through the gray giants of the sylvan wild; Yet many a sheltered glade, with blossoms gay, Beneath the showery sky and sunshine mild, Within the shaggy arms of that dark forest smiled. 18aVVVVFVGVV V 8V9eVfVVVXXVIII. And where his willing waves yon bright blue bay Sends up, to kiss his decorated brim, And cradles, in his soft embrace, the gay Young group of grassy islands born of him, And, crowding nigh, or in the distance dim, Lifts the white throng of sails, that bear or bring The commerce of the world;with tawny limb, And belt and beads in sunlight glistening, The savage urged his skiff like wild bird on the wing. XXIX. Then, all this youthful paradise around, And all the broad and boundless mainland, lay Cooled by the interminable wood, that frowned Oer mount and vale, where never summer ray Glanced, till the strong tornado broke his way Through the gray giants of the sylvan wild; Yet many a sheltered glade, with blossoms gay, Beneath the showery sky and sunshine mild, Within the shaggy arms of that dark forest smiled. 18`CARD;@:k s9267[William Cullen Bryant V0V1_V`VVV$V%PVQ VVV KVLwVxVVVXXXII. Look now abroadanother race has filled These populous borderswide the wood recedes, And towns shoot up, and fertile realms are tilled; The land is full of harvests and green meads; Streams numberless, that many a fountain feeds, Shine, disembowered, and give to sun and breeze Their virgin waters; the full region leads New colonies forth, that toward the western seas Spread, like a rapid flame among the autumnal trees. XXXIII. Here the free spirit of mankind, at length, Throws its last fetters off; and who shall place A limit to the giants unchained strength, Or curb his swiftness in the forward race? Far, like the comets way through infinite space, Stretches the long untravelled path of light Into the depths of ages: we may trace, Distant, the brightening glory of its flight, Till the receding rays are lost to human sight. 倆V0V1_V`VVV$V%PVQVVV KVLwVxVVVXXXII. Look now abroadanother race has filled These populous borderswide the wood recedes, And towns shoot up, and fertile realms are tilled; The land is full of harvests and green meads; Streams numberless, that many a fountain feeds, Shine, disembowered, and give to sun and breeze Their virgin waters; the full region leads New colonies forth, that toward the western seas Spread, like a rapid flame among the autumnal trees. XXXIII. Here the free spirit of mankind, at length, Throws its last fetters off; and who shall place A limit to the giants unchained strength, Or curb his swiftness in the forward race? Far, like the comets way through infinite space, Stretches the long untravelled path of light Into the depths of ages: we may trace, Distant, the brightening glory of its flight, Till the receding rays are lost to human sight. 18`CARD=@:k  s9268[William Cullen Bryant V1V2fVgVVV#V$SVT VVVBVCmVnVVVXXXIV. Europe is given a prey to sterner fates, And writhes in shackles; strong the arms that chain To earth her struggling multitude of states; She too is strong, and might not chafe in vain Against them, but shake off the vampyre train That batten on her blood, and break their net. Yes, she shall look on brighter days, and gain The meed of worthier deeds; the moment set To rescue and raise up, draws nearbut is not yet. XXXV. But thou, my country, thou shalt never fall, But with thy childrenthy maternal care, Thy lavish love, thy blessings showered on all These are thy fettersseas and stormy air Are the wide barrier of thy borders, where Among thy gallant sons that guard thee well, Thou laughst at enemies: who shall then declare The date of thy deep-founded strength, or tell How happy, in thy lap, the sons of men shall dwell? 〆V1V2fVgVVV#V$SVTVVVBVCmVnVVVXXXIV. Europe is given a prey to sterner fates, And writhes in shackles; strong the arms that chain To earth her struggling multitude of states; She too is strong, and might not chafe in vain Against them, but shake off the vampyre train That batten on her blood, and break their net. Yes, she shall look on brighter days, and gain The meed of worthier deeds; the moment set To rescue and raise up, draws nearbut is not yet. XXXV. But thou, my country, thou shalt never fall, But with thy childrenthy maternal care, Thy lavish love, thy blessings showered on all These are thy fettersseas and stormy air Are the wide barrier of thy borders, where Among thy gallant sons that guard thee well, Thou laughst at enemies: who shall then declare The date of thy deep-founded strength, or tell How happy, in thy lap, the sons of men shall dwell? 18 CARD?@:k s9270[William Cullen Bryantπ V!Duly I sought thy banks, and tried My first rude numbers by thy side. Words cannot tell how bright and gay The scenes of life before me lay. Then glorious hopes, that now to speak Would bring the blood into my cheek, Passed oer me; and I wrote on high A name I deemed should never die. Years change thee not. Upon yon hill The tall old maples, verdant still, Yet tell, grandeur of decay, How swift the years have passed away, Since first, a child, and half afraid, I wandered in the forest shade. Thou, ever joyous rivulet, Dost dimple, leap, and prattle yet; And sporting with the sands that pave The windings of thy silver wave, And dancing to thy own wild chime, Thou laughest at the lapse of time. π V!Duly I sought thy banks, and tried My first rude numbers by thy side. Words cannot tell how bright and gay The scenes of life before me lay. Then glorious hopes, that now to speak Would bring the blood into my cheek, Passed oer me; and I wrote on high A name I deemed should never die. Years change thee not. Upon yon hill The tall old maples, verdant still, Yet tell, grandeur of decay, How swift the years have passed away, Since first, a child, and half afraid, I wandered in the forest shade. Thou, ever joyous rivulet, Dost dimple, leap, and prattle yet; And sporting with the sands that pave The windings of thy silver wave, And dancing to thy own wild chime, Thou laughest at the lapse of time. 18CARDB@:k s9272[William Cullen BryantǀVIve tried the worldit wears no more The coloring of romance it wore. Yet well has nature kept the truth She promised to my earliest youth; The radiant beauty, shed abroad On all the glorious works of God, Shows freshly, to my sobered eye, Each charm it wore in days gone by. A few brief years shall pass away, And I, all trembling, weak, and gray, Bowed to the earth, which waits to fold My ashes in the embracing mould, (If haply the dark will of fate Indulge my life so long a date) May come for the last time to look Upon my childhoods favorite brook. Then dimly on my eye shall gleam The sparkle of thy dancing stream; And faintly on my ear shall fall Thy prattling currents merry call; ǀVIve tried the worldit wears no more The coloring of romance it wore. Yet well has nature kept the truth She promised to my earliest youth; The radiant beauty, shed abroad On all the glorious works of God, Shows freshly, to my sobered eye, Each charm it wore in days gone by. A few brief years shall pass away, And I, all trembling, weak, and gray, Bowed to the earth, which waits to fold My ashes in the embracing mould, (If haply the dark will of fate Indulge my life so long a date) May come for the last time to look Upon my childhoods favorite brook. Then dimly on my eye shall gleam The sparkle of thy dancing stream; And faintly on my ear shall fall Thy prattling currents merry call; 18@CARDC6@:k s9273[William Cullen BryanthMVN>Yet shalt thou flow as glad and bright As when thou metst my infant sight. And I shall sleepand on thy side, As ages after ages glide, Children their early sports shall try, And pass to hoary age and die. But thou, unchanged from year to year, Gaily shalt play and glitter here; Amid young flowers and tender grass Thy endless infancy shalt pass; And, singing down thy narrow glen, Shalt mock the fading race of men. Summer Wind It is a sultry day; the sun has drank The dew that lay upon the morning grass, There is no rustling in the lofty elm That canopies my dwelling, and its shade hMVNrYet shalt thou flow as glad and bright As when thou metst my infant sight. And I shall sleepand on thy side, As ages after ages glide, Children their early sports shall try, And pass to hoary age and die. But thou, unchanged from year to year, Gaily shalt play and glitter here; Amid young flowers and tender grass Thy endless infancy shalt pass; And, singing down thy narrow glen, Shalt mock the fading race of men. Summer Wind It is a sultry day; the sun has drank The dew that lay upon the morning grass, There is no rustling in the lofty elm That canopies my dwelling, and its shade 18CARDM@;, s9282[William Cullen BryantVVVVhViVV.V/VV VThe farmer swung the scythe or turned the hay, And twixt the heavy swaths his children were at play. It was a scene of peaceand, like a spell, Did that serene and golden sunlight fall Upon the motionless wood that clothed the fell, And precipice upspringing like a wall, And glassy river and white waterfall, And happy living things that trod the bright And beauteous scene; while far beyond them all, On many a lovely valley, out of sight, Was poured from the blue heavens the same soft golden light. I looked, and thought the quiet of the scene An emblem of the peace that yet shall be, When, oer earths continents and isles between, The noise of war shall cease from sea to sea, And married nations dwell in harmony; When millions, crouching in the dust to one, No more shall beg their lives on bended knee, 18VhViVV.V/VV VThe farmer swung the scythe or turned the hay, And twixt the heavy swaths his children were at play. It was a scene of peaceand, like a spell, Did that serene and golden sunlight fall Upon the motionless wood that clothed the fell, And precipice upspringing like a wall, And glassy river and white waterfall, And happy living things that trod the bright And beauteous scene; while far beyond them all, On many a lovely valley, out of sight, Was poured from the blue heavens the same soft golden light. I looked, and thought the quiet of the scene An emblem of the peace that yet shall be, When, oer earths continents and isles between, The noise of war shall cease from sea to sea, And married nations dwell in harmony; When millions, crouching in the dust to one, No more shall beg their lives on bended knee, 18CARDP@;, s9284[William Cullen BryantBV}V~VV1V2VVGVH The mountains that infold In their wide sweep, the colored landscape round, Seem groups of giant kings, in purple and gold, That guard the enchanted ground. I roam the woods that crown The upland, where the mingled splendors glow, Where the gay company of trees look down On the green fields below. My steps are not alone In these bright walks; the sweet southwest, at play, Flies, rustling, where the painted leaves are strown Along the winding way. And far in heaven, the while, The sun, that sends that gale to wander here, Pours out on the fair earth his quiet smile, The sweetest of the year. 18}V~VV1V2VVGVH The mountains that infold In their wide sweep, the colored landscape round, Seem groups of giant kings, in purple and gold, That guard the enchanted ground. I roam the woods that crown The upland, where the mingled splendors glow, Where the gay company of trees look down On the green fields below. My steps are not alone In these bright walks; the sweet southwest, at play, Flies, rustling, where the painted leaves are strown Along the winding way. And far in heaven, the while, The sun, that sends that gale to wander here, Pours out on the fair earth his quiet smile, The sweetest of the year. 18CARDRB@;, s9286[William Cullen BryantBVnVoVVVV>V Oh, Autumn! why so soon Depart the hues that make thy forests glad; Thy gentle wind and thy fair sunny noon, And leave thee wild and sad! Ah! twere a lot too blest Forever in thy colored shades to stray; Amidst the kisses of the soft southwest To rove and dream for aye; And leave the vain low strife That makes men madthe tug for wealth and power, The passions and the cares that wither life, And waste its little hour. November Yet one smile more, departing distant sun! One mellow smile through the soft vapory air, Ere, oer the frozen earth, the loud winds run, 18nVoVVVVrV Oh, Autumn! why so soon Depart the hues that make thy forests glad; Thy gentle wind and thy fair sunny noon, And leave thee wild and sad! Ah! twere a lot too blest Forever in thy colored shades to stray; Amidst the kisses of the soft southwest To rove and dream for aye; And leave the vain low strife That makes men madthe tug for wealth and power, The passions and the cares that wither life, And waste its little hour. November Yet one smile more, departing distant sun! One mellow smile through the soft vapory air, Ere, oer the frozen earth, the loud winds run, 18CARD\@To where life shrinks from the fierce Alpine air. Gaze on them, till the tears shall dim thy sight, But keep that earlier, wilder image bright. To the Fringed Gentian Thou blossom bright with autumn dew, And colored with the heavens own blue, That openest, when the quiet light Succeeds the keen and frosty night. Thou comest not when violets lean Oer wandering brooks and springs unseen, Or columbines, in purple drest, Nod oer the ground birds hidden nest. Thou waitest late, and comst alone, When woods are bare and birds are flown, And frosts and shortening days portend The aged year is near its end. qq  qqqq%q&,q-2V37q8:q;@qAEqFIqJOqPUqVYqZ]q^eVfrTo where life shrinks from the fierce Alpine air. Gaze on them, till the tears shall dim thy sight, But keep that earlier, wilder image bright. To the Fringed Gentian Thou blossom bright with autumn dew, And colored with the heavens own blue, That openest, when the quiet light Succeeds the keen and frosty night. Thou comest not when violets lean Oer wandering brooks and springs unseen, Or columbines, in purple drest, Nod oer the ground birds hidden nest. Thou waitest late, and comst alone, When woods are bare and birds are flown, And frosts and shortening days portend The aged year is near its end. 18 CARDj@= s9306[William Cullen Bryant6V7 And hedged them round with forests. Fitting floor For this magnificent temple of the sky With flowers whose glory and whose multitude Rival the constellations! The great heavens Seem to stoop down upon the scene in love, A nearer vault, and of a tenderer blue, Than that which bends above the eastern hills. As oer the verdant waste I guide my steed, Among the high rank grass that sweeps his sides, The hollow beating of his footstep seems A sacrilegious sound. I think of those Upon whose rest he tramples. Are they here The dead of other days?and did the dust Of these fair solitudes once stir with life And burn with passion? Let the mighty mounds That overlook the rivers, or that rise In the dim forest crowded with old oaks, Answer. A race, that long has passed away, Built them;a disciplined and populous race Heaped, with long toil, the earth, while yet the Greek Was hewing the Pentelicus to forms EA race, that long has passed awaychar 747 to 779 of bkgnd field id 1CardA race...awaychar 295 to 311 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 939367 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falsePentelicuschar 896 to 905 of bkgnd field id 1CardPentelicuschar 514 to 523 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 939367 of stack "POETRY, annotated"false6V7 And hedged them round with forests. Fitting floor For this magnificent temple of the sky With flowers whose glory and whose multitude Rival the constellations! The great heavens Seem to stoop down upon the scene in love, A nearer vault, and of a tenderer blue, Than that which bends above the eastern hills. As oer the verdant waste I guide my steed, Among the high rank grass that sweeps his sides, The hollow beating of his footstep seems A sacrilegious sound. I think of those Upon whose rest he tramples. Are they here The dead of other days?and did the dust Of these fair solitudes once stir with life And burn with passion? Let the mighty mounds That overlook the rivers, or that rise In the dim forest crowded with old oaks, Answer. A race, that long has passed away, Built them;a disciplined and populous race Heaped, with long toil, the earth, while yet the Greek Was hewing the Pentelicus to forms 18CARD @? 2s9342[Maria Gowen BrooksV/V0V VLVMVV4V6B G{V|I leave her, for my needful cares, at leisure To muse upon and feel her lonely state; At my returning, though restraind her pleasure, There needs no Spirits eye to see she does not hate. XXXI. Oft have I lookd in mortal hearts, to know How love, by slow advances, knows to twine Each fibre with his wreaths; then overthrow At once each stern resolve. The maidens mine! Yet have I never pressd her ermine hand, Nor touchd the living coral of her lip; Though listening to its tones, so sweet, so bland. Ive thought,oh, impious thought!who formd might sip! XXXII. Most impious thought! Soul, I would rein thee in Een as the quick-eyed Parthian quells his steeds; F/V0VVLVMVV4V6{V|I leave her, for my needful cares, at leisure To muse upon and feel her lonely state; At my returning, though restraind her pleasure, There needs no Spirits eye to see she does not hate. XXXI. Oft have I lookd in mortal hearts, to know How love, by slow advances, knows to twine Each fibre with his wreaths; then overthrow At once each stern resolve. The maidens mine! Yet have I never pressd her ermine hand, Nor touchd the living coral of her lip; Though listening to its tones, so sweet, so bland. Ive thought,oh, impious thought!who formd might sip! XXXII. Most impious thought! Soul, I would rein thee in Een as the quick-eyed Parthian quells his steeds; 19@CARDp@= s9311[William Cullen Bryant[VVNo stain of thy dark birthplace; gushing up From the red mould and slimy roots of earth, Thou flashest in the sun. The mountain air, In winter, is not clearer, nor the dew That shines on mountain blossom. Thus doth God Bring, from the dark and foul, the pure and bright. This tangled thicket on the bank above Thy basin, how thy waters keep it green! For thou dost feed the roots of the wild vine That trails all over it, and to the twigs Ties fast her clusters. There the spice-bush lifts Her leafy lances; the viburnum there, Paler of foliage, to the sun holds up Her circlet of green berries. In and out The chipping sparrow, in her coat of brown, Steals silently, lest I should mark her nest. Not such thou wert of yore, ere yet the axe Had smitten the old woods. Then hoary trunks Of oak, and plane, and hickory, oer thee held [VVNo stain of thy dark birthplace; gushing up From the red mould and slimy roots of earth, Thou flashest in the sun. The mountain air, In winter, is not clearer, nor the dew That shines on mountain blossom. Thus doth God Bring, from the dark and foul, the pure and bright. This tangled thicket on the bank above Thy basin, how thy waters keep it green! For thou dost feed the roots of the wild vine That trails all over it, and to the twigs Ties fast her clusters. There the spice-bush lifts Her leafy lances; the viburnum there, Paler of foliage, to the sun holds up Her circlet of green berries. In and out The chipping sparrow, in her coat of brown, Steals silently, lest I should mark her nest. Not such thou wert of yore, ere yet the axe Had smitten the old woods. Then hoary trunks Of oak, and plane, and hickory, oer thee held 18 Јs CARDtw@= ls9315[William Cullen BryantfqqqUVVqqqqqqqqThen all around was heard the crash of trees, Trembling awhile and rushing to the ground, The low of ox, and shouts of men who fired The brushwood, or who tore the earth with ploughs. The grain sprang thick and tall, and hid in green The blackened hill-side; ranks of spiky maize Rose like a host embattled; the buckwheat Whitened broad acres, sweetening with its flowers The August wind. White cottages were seen With rose-trees at the windows; barns from which Came loud and shrill the crowing of the cock; Pastures where rolled and neighed the lordly horse, And white flocks browsed and bleated. A rich turf Of grasses brought from far oercrept thy bank, Spotted with the white clover. Blue-eyed girls Brought pails, and dipped them in thy crystal pool; And children, ruddy-cheeked and flaxen-haired, Gathered the glistening cowslip from thy edge. Since then, what steps have trod thy border! Here On thy green bank, the woodman of the swamp fqqqUVVqqqqqqqqThen all around was heard the crash of trees, Trembling awhile and rushing to the ground, The low of ox, and shouts of men who fired The brushwood, or who tore the earth with ploughs. The grain sprang thick and tall, and hid in green The blackened hill-side; ranks of spiky maize Rose like a host embattled; the buckwheat Whitened broad acres, sweetening with its flowers The August wind. White cottages were seen With rose-trees at the windows; barns from which Came loud and shrill the crowing of the cock; Pastures where rolled and neighed the lordly horse, And white flocks browsed and bleated. A rich turf Of grasses brought from far oercrept thy bank, Spotted with the white clover. Blue-eyed girls Brought pails, and dipped them in thy crystal pool; And children, ruddy-cheeked and flaxen-haired, Gathered the glistening cowslip from thy edge. Since then, what steps have trod thy border! Here On thy green bank, the woodman of the swamp 18 ȔԼs~~ ȄCARD|@>D s9322[William Cullen Bryant,SVTqqqqqqqqqq"q#%q&*q+/q04q58q9Faintly repeat, till morning, after thee, The story of thine endless goings forth. Yet there are those who lie beside thy bed For whom thou once didst rear the bowers that screen Thy margin, and didst water the green fields; And now there is no night so still that they Can hear thy lapse; their slumbers, were thy voice Louder than Oceans, it could never break. For them the early violet no more Opens upon thy bank, nor, for their eyes, Glitter the crimson pictures of the clouds, Upon thy bosom, when the sun goes down. Their memories are abroad, the memories Of those who last were gathered to the earth, Lingering within the homes in which they sat, Hovering above the paths in which they walked, Haunting them like a presence. Even now They visit many a dreamer in the forms They walked in, ere at last they wore the shroud. And eyes there are which will not close to dream, For weeping and for thinking of the grave, ,SVTqqqqqqqqqq"q#%q&*q+/q04q58q9Faintly repeat, till morning, after thee, The story of thine endless goings forth. Yet there are those who lie beside thy bed For whom thou once didst rear the bowers that screen Thy margin, and didst water the green fields; And now there is no night so still that they Can hear thy lapse; their slumbers, were thy voice Louder than Oceans, it could never break. For them the early violet no more Opens upon thy bank, nor, for their eyes, Glitter the crimson pictures of the clouds, Upon thy bosom, when the sun goes down. Their memories are abroad, the memories Of those who last were gathered to the earth, Lingering within the homes in which they sat, Hovering above the paths in which they walked, Haunting them like a presence. Even now They visit many a dreamer in the forms They walked in, ere at last they wore the shroud. And eyes there are which will not close to dream, For weeping and for thinking of the grave, 18 s,& CARDx@= s9318[William Cullen BryantC>VVThe Painted Cup The fresh savannas of the Sangamon Here rise in gentle swells, and the long grass Is mixed with rustling hazels. Scarlet tufts Are glowing in the green, like flakes of fire; The wanderers of the prairie know them well, And call that brilliant flower the Painted Cup. Now, if thou art a poet, tell me not That these bright chalices were tinted thus To hold the dew for fairies, when they meet On moonlight evenings in the hazel bowers, And dance till they are thirsty. Call not up, Amid this fresh and virgin solitude, The faded fancies of an elder world; But leave these scarlet cups to spotted moths Of June, and glistening flies, and humming-birds, To drink from, when on all these boundless lawns The morning sun looks hot. Or let the wind Oerturn in sport their ruddy brims, and pour CrVVThe Painted Cup The fresh savannas of the Sangamon Here rise in gentle swells, and the long grass Is mixed with rustling hazels. Scarlet tufts Are glowing in the green, like flakes of fire; The wanderers of the prairie know them well, And call that brilliant flower the Painted Cup. Now, if thou art a poet, tell me not That these bright chalices were tinted thus To hold the dew for fairies, when they meet On moonlight evenings in the hazel bowers, And dance till they are thirsty. Call not up, Amid this fresh and virgin solitude, The faded fancies of an elder world; But leave these scarlet cups to spotted moths Of June, and glistening flies, and humming-birds, To drink from, when on all these boundless lawns The morning sun looks hot. Or let the wind Oerturn in sport their ruddy brims, and pour 18 CARDy@= s9319[William Cullen BryantTV5q69q:@qADqELqMRqSVqWqqq$q%*q+.q/7q8?>[A sudden shower upon the strawberry plant, To swell the reddening fruit that even now Breathes a slight fragrance from the sunny slope. But thou art of a gayer fancy. Well Let then the gentle Manitou of flowers, Lingering amid the bloomy waste he loves, Though all his swarthy worshippers are gone Slender and small, his rounded cheek all brown And ruddy with the sunshine; let him come On summer mornings, when the blossoms wake, And part with little hands the spiky grass; And touching, with his cherry lips, the edge Of these bright beakers, drain the gathered dew. The Night Journey of a River Oh River, gentle River! gliding on In silence underneath this starless sky! Thine is a ministry that never rests TV5q69q:@qADqELqMRqSVqWqqq$q%*q+.q/7q8?r[A sudden shower upon the strawberry plant, To swell the reddening fruit that even now Breathes a slight fragrance from the sunny slope. But thou art of a gayer fancy. Well Let then the gentle Manitou of flowers, Lingering amid the bloomy waste he loves, Though all his swarthy worshippers are gone Slender and small, his rounded cheek all brown And ruddy with the sunshine; let him come On summer mornings, when the blossoms wake, And part with little hands the spiky grass; And touching, with his cherry lips, the edge Of these bright beakers, drain the gathered dew. The Night Journey of a River Oh River, gentle River! gliding on In silence underneath this starless sky! Thine is a ministry that never rests 18CARDW@>D s9324[William Cullen Bryant* V Of the dull watchman, pacing on the wharf, Falls the soft ripple of the waves that strike On the moored bark; but guiltier listeners Are nigh, the prowlers of the night, who steal From shadowy nook to shadowy nook, and start If other sounds than thine are in the air. Oh, glide away from those abodes, that bring Pollution to thy channel and make foul Thy once clear current; summon thy quick waves And dimpling eddies; linger not, but haste, With all thy waters, haste thee to the deep, There to be tossed by shifting winds and rocked By that mysterious force which lives within The seas immensity, and wields the weight Of its abysses, swaying to and fro The billowy mass, until the stain, at length, Shall wholly pass away, and thou regain The crystal brightness of thy mountain-springs. * V Of the dull watchman, pacing on the wharf, Falls the soft ripple of the waves that strike On the moored bark; but guiltier listeners Are nigh, the prowlers of the night, who steal From shadowy nook to shadowy nook, and start If other sounds than thine are in the air. Oh, glide away from those abodes, that bring Pollution to thy channel and make foul Thy once clear current; summon thy quick waves And dimpling eddies; linger not, but haste, With all thy waters, haste thee to the deep, There to be tossed by shifting winds and rocked By that mysterious force which lives within The seas immensity, and wields the weight Of its abysses, swaying to and fro The billowy mass, until the stain, at length, Shall wholly pass away, and thou regain The crystal brightness of thy mountain-springs. 18 dszz @CARD}@>D s9323[William Cullen BryantaV.q/2q38q9=q>BqCGqHKqLQqRTqU_q`gqhlqmpqqwqxzq{qqqqqqqqqThe new-made grave, and the pale one within. These memories and these sorrows all shall fade, And pass away, and fresher memories And newer sorrows come and dwell awhile Beside thy borders, and, in turn, depart. On glide thy waters, till at last they flow Beneath the windows of the populous town, And all night long give back the gleam of lamps, And glimmer with the trains of light that stream From halls where dancers whirl. A dimmer ray Touches thy surface from the silent room In which they tend the sick, or gather round The dying; and a slender, steady beam Comes from the little chamber, in the roof Where, with a feverous crimson on her cheek, The solitary damsel, dying, too, Plies the quick needle till the stars grow pale. There, close beside the haunts of revel, stand The blank, unlighted windows, where the poor, In hunger and in darkness, wake till morn. There, drowsily, on the half-conscious ear aV.q/2q38q9=q>BqCGqHKqLQqRTqU_q`gqhlqmpqqwqxzq{qqqqqqqqqThe new-made grave, and the pale one within. These memories and these sorrows all shall fade, And pass away, and fresher memories And newer sorrows come and dwell awhile Beside thy borders, and, in turn, depart. On glide thy waters, till at last they flow Beneath the windows of the populous town, And all night long give back the gleam of lamps, And glimmer with the trains of light that stream From halls where dancers whirl. A dimmer ray Touches thy surface from the silent room In which they tend the sick, or gather round The dying; and a slender, steady beam Comes from the little chamber, in the roof Where, with a feverous crimson on her cheek, The solitary damsel, dying, too, Plies the quick needle till the stars grow pale. There, close beside the haunts of revel, stand The blank, unlighted windows, where the poor, In hunger and in darkness, wake till morn. There, drowsily, on the half-conscious ear 18 `CARD@D s9424[A. Bronson Alcott*&'STVcdiltAnd turn the adamantine spindle round, On which the fate of gods and men is wound. MILTON. Romancer, far more coy than that coy sex! Perchance some stroke of magic thee befell, Ere thy baronial keep the Muse did vex, Nor grant deliverance from enchanted spell, But tease thee all the while and sore perplex, Till thou that wizard tale shouldst fairly tell, Better than poets in thy own clear prose. Painter of sin in its deep scarlet dyes, Thy doomsday pencil Justice doth expose, Hearing and judging at the dread assize; New Englands guilt blazoning before all eyes, No other chronicler than thee she chose. Magician deathless! dost thou vigil keep, Whilst neath our pines thou feignest deathlike sleep? And turn the adamantine spindle round,char 1 to 38 of bkgnd field id 1Card.char 642 to 644 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 941243 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseOn which the fate of gods and men is wound.char 40 to 83 of bkgnd field id 1CardMILchar 645 to 647 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 941243 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseMILTON.char 100 to 106 of bkgnd field id 1CardTON.char 648 to 651 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 941243 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseRomancerchar 109 to 116 of bkgnd field id 1CardRomancerchar 9 to 16 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 941398 of stack "POETRY, annotated"falseAnd turn the adamantine spindle round, On which the fate of gods and men is wound.char 1 to 83 of bkgnd field id 1Card...char 639 to 643 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 941243 of stack "really real"falseMILTONchar 100 to 105 of bkgnd field id 1CardMILTONchar 645 to 650 of bkgnd field id 1cd id 941243 of stack "really real"false24TRNpSTVcjltAnd turn the adamantine spindle round, On which the fate of gods and men is wound. MILTON. Romancer, far more coy than that coy sex! Perchance some stroke of magic thee befell, Ere thy baronial keep the Muse did vex, Nor grant deliverance from enchanted spell, But tease thee all the while and sore perplex, Till thou that wizard tale shouldst fairly tell, Better than poets in thy own clear prose. Painter of sin in its deep scarlet dyes, Thy doomsday pencil Justice doth expose, Hearing and judging at the dread assize;CARDV@F s9441[ Thomas ColeJV,V-/q05q6>q?AqBEqFJqKMqNSqTVqW]V^VqqqqqqqVqqqqqqq q  qqV HVInVoVV*V+RVSVVV So changed my thought from light to shade; At times exulting in the glow of hope, at times In darkness cast by what my soul had said; Till sunk in reverie her words seemed chimes From some far tower, that tell of nuptial joy, Or knell that fills the air as with a lingering sigh. Again I raised my downcast eyes to look Upon the scene so beautiful when lo! The stream no longer from the cavern took Its gentle way tween flowery banks & low But through a landscape varied, rich & vast Beneath a sky that dusky cloud had surely never passed. Wide was the river; with majestic flow And pomp & power it swept the curving banks Like some great conqueror whose march is slow Through tributary lands; while the abasd ranks, Shrinking give back on either hand oerawed As though their hearts confirmed the presence of a God. 42ظCARD\@>D |s9327[William Cullen Bryant!qqqqqqq'V(>q?AqBEqFLqMTqUWqXZq[bqcThe ever-burning stars. It is thy sight That is so dark, and not the heavens. Thine eyes, Were they but clear, would see a fiery host Above thee; Hercules, with flashing mace, The Lyre with silver chords, the Swan uppoised On gleaming wings, the Dolphin gliding on With glistening scales, and that poetic steed, With beamy mane, whose hoof struck out from earth The fount of Hippocrene, and many more, Fair clustered splendors, with whose rays the Night Shall close her march in glory, ere she yield, To the young Day, the great earth steeped in dew. So spake the monitor, and I perceived How vain were my repinings, and my thought Went backward to the vanished years and all The good and great who came and passed with them, And knew that ever would the years to come Bring with them, in their course, the good and great, Lights of the world, though, to my clouded sight, Their rays might seem but dim, or reach me not. !qqqqqqq'V(>q?AqBEqFLqMTqUWqXZq[bqcThe ever-burning stars. It is thy sight That is so dark, and not the heavens. Thine eyes, Were they but clear, would see a fiery host Above thee; Hercules, with flashing mace, The Lyre with silver chords, the Swan uppoised On gleaming wings, the Dolphin gliding on With glistening scales, and that poetic steed, With beamy mane, whose hoof struck out from earth The fount of Hippocrene, and many more, Fair clustered splendors, with whose rays the Night Shall close her march in glory, ere she yield, To the young Day, the great earth steeped in dew. So spake the monitor, and I perceived How vain were my repinings, and my thought Went backward to the vanished years and all The good and great who came and passed with them, And knew that ever would the years to come Bring with them, in their course, the good and great, Lights of the world, though, to my clouded sight, Their rays might seem but dim, or reach me not. 18CARD]@>D s9328[William Cullen BryantJ>)V*zV{VV_V`VVDVEDante Who, mid the grasses of the field That spring beneath our careless feet, First found the shining stems that yield The grains of life-sustaining wheat: Who first, upon the furrowed land, Strewed the bright grains to sprout, and grow, And ripen for the reapers hand We know not, and we cannot know. But well we know the hand that brought And scattered, far as sight can reach, The seeds of free and living thought On the broad field of modern speech. Mid the white hills that round us lie, We cherish that Great Sowers fame, And, as we pile the sheaves on high, With awe we utter Dantes name. Jr)V*zV{VV_V`VVDVEDante Who, mid the grasses of the field That spring beneath our careless feet, First found the shining stems that yield The grains of life-sustaining wheat: Who first, upon the furrowed land, Strewed the bright grains to sprout, and grow, And ripen for the reapers hand We know not, and we cannot know. But well we know the hand that brought And scattered, far as sight can reach, The seeds of free and living thought On the broad field of modern speech. Mid the white hills that round us lie, We cherish that Great Sowers fame, And, as we pile the sheaves on high, With awe we utter Dantes name. 18CARDM@>D s9332[Maria Gowen BrooksKVZV[_q`bqcfqgnqosqtxqyzq{qVVD GuVvV  4V5V And slowly gains the Tigris, where tis lost; By a forgotten prince, of old, twas made, And, in its course, f